A History of Beckenham

With edits up to March 2024

©Malvin Mitchell and Keith Baldwin

 
Timeline 1400 - 1600    
Back to Intro     Next Page (Timeline 1600-1800)

For this time frame we'll start with  Henry the fifth's reign.

1399 - King Henry IV until 1413

1399 - Foxgrove (by Philipot) is the last place of Account in this Parish, .....succeeded Bartholomew Lord Burwash, and he held it at his Decease, which was in the twenty ninth year of Edward the third (1356). and from him it descended to his Son Bartholomew Lord Burwash, who in the forty third year of the abovesaid Prince (1370), passed it away to Sir Walter de Paveley, and in his Family it remained untill the latter End of Richard the second, (1399) and then it was conveyed to Vaux of the County of North-Hampton,

But see the 1400 Close Rolls entry. What we discover is that many of these transfers are to do with family intermarriage and inheritance, often complicated by lack of male heirs and sometimes divisions of property between daughters. Also  Philipot  had some details  wrong or generalized ie 'latter end'  rather than an actual date.

1399 – This Fine (Final Agreement) Believed to be land belonging to Old Court Manor Greenwich which in Beckenham was a small plot next to Cocapanniers Wood near Langley which descended to John Morden and Morden College;  These diverse properties are unidentified so far but a separate thread of research could follow Ralph Nevill? The extent of the Beckenham and Lewisham land is also unknown but in Beckenham a site later belongs to Morden College as a bequest from John Morden who acquires Old Court Manor from Charles II. The Earl of Westmorland and the mention of John Norbury tempts us to connect with the area of Norbury. Hugh Middelton only has a lease for life. See1389 and 1414 

CP 25/1/111/254, number 7.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Two weeks from St Martin, 1 Henry [IV] [25 November 1399]. And afterwards one week from St Hilary in the same year [20 January 1400].

Parties:

John N[orbu?]ry, esquire, and Pernel, his wife, querents, and Ralph de Neuyll', knight, earl of Westmorland, deforciant.

Property:

7 messuages, 280 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow, 40 acres of wood and 28 shillings of rent in Estgrenewich'LeueshamKettebrokeElthamChesilhirst'Charleton'Bokenham and le Lee, which Hugh de Middelton' holds for life.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

The earl has acknowledged the tenements to be the right of John, and has granted for himself and his heirs that the tenements - which Hugh held for life of the inheritance of the earl in the aforesaid vills on the day the agreement was made, and which after the decease of Hugh ought to revert to the earl and his heirs - after the decease of Hugh shall remain to John and Pernel and the heirs of John, to hold of the chief lords for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

John and Pernel have given him 200 marks of silver.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

John Norbury, Pernel Norbury, Ralph de Neville, earl of Westmorland, Hugh de Middleton

Places:

East Greenwich, Lewisham, Kidbrooke, Eltham, Chislehurst, Charlton, Beckenham, Lee

1400 - Foxgrove: Close Rolls of Henry IV; Thomas Hakkethorp of Yorkshire to Elizabeth who was wife of Edward le Despenser. Quitclaim of the manor of Foxgrove and of all lands, rents, services, commons etc. in Bekenham and elsewhere in Kent, Surrey and Sussex. Dated 25 May 1 Henry IV. (BHO, Family Search).

This may be surrender of a lease as Elizabeth was daughter of Bartholomew Burgherst (1329-1369). See 1384 where Hakkethorp/Haithorp and others sue for possession of Foxgrove as they are husbands of daughters related to Henry de Cliffe. The family tree in the Plea Rolls shows how Henry de Cliffe d.1332 had a brother John who's son Henry had one son, Hugh, and three daughters. The son Hugh apparently died without issue and the three daughters' surviving husbands sued for shared ownership of Foxgrove. This is complicated as the manor appears to have been held by de Cliffe and Bartholomew Burghersh at the same time Margaret. This requires more clarification. Suffice it to say that these possessors appear to be absentee landlords having little to do apart from derive rents from the property.

A quitclaim relinquishes interest in a property. Kent Surrey and Sussex may include properties described elsewhere under Bartholomew de Burghersh which Burghersh ‘held of’ Bardolf. See 1384 as I believe Hakkethorp is a spelling variation of Haithorp and this is bound up with the inheritance of Foxgrove through the descendants of Bardolf.  Elizabeth in this memorandum dies in 1409; Burgherssh (Elizabeth) la Despenser. (fn. 1) -To be buried in the church of Our Lady of Teukesbury near her lord Edward, Sire (Edward) le Despenser, and her son Thomas, Sire le Despenser. Directions for funeral, chantries, &c. To Geffrey Scotte a tenement in Petrislane in London for life. Dated 4 July, A.D. 1409.

1400 – Beckenham Manor; Post Mortem Inquisition at Deptford. 10 Sept 1407. Ingram Bruyn, Knight. at the time of his death 12th August 1400, as well as several other properties in other counties He held the manor of Beckenham with the advowson to himself and the heirs male of his body, and failing them to William Marny, knight, and his heirs male. It is held of the king in chief by knight service, annual value 10 marks.
Date of death 12th August, and heir was his son Maurice Bruin aged over 14. See 1407 Inquisition Post Mortem.

(This section implies that John Martham, parson of Beckenham has some rights over Rowner manor and advowson in Hampshire) Rowner, the manor and the advowson, jointly with Elizabeth his (Ingram Bruyn's)wife, who still lives, by the grant of John Martham, parson of Beckenham in Kent, by his indenture dated 24 Feb. 1393, with remainder, in default of heirs male of Ingram to William Marny, son and heir of Robert de Marny, knight, and his heirs male. They are held of the king by a rent of 40s., annual value of the manor £10 and of the advowson when it occurs 10 marks.
Date of death and heir as above.

1403 - Memorandum of Acknowledgement; Beckenham but property unidentified: Stephen Brunne citizen and grocer of London, son and heir of Richard Brunne and of Cicely his wife daughter and heir of Reynold son and heir of John Julian, to Nicholas Carreu the elder esquire of Surrey, his heirs and assigns. Quitclaim with warranty of all lands, rents and services in Croydoun, Sanderstede, Micham, Begenham, Wodemersthorn, Bedyngton, Cressalton, Brystow, Hourne, Lyngefelde, Cullisdoun, Farley, Adyngton and elsewhere in Surrey sometime of the said John Julyan. Dated 6 December 5 Henry IV. (BHO)

This Richard Brunne may be a younger son of Sir William Bruyn and his brother would have been Sir Ingram Bruyn so if correct then Stephen would be the grandson of Sir William Bruyn. As the main Manor land remained intact these properties remain unidentified or it might be that as Sir Ingram Bruyn was the primary landowner he had leased it to Stephen who assigned the lease to Carreu (Carew). Carreu is a line of research. Nicholas Carew, Lord Privvy Seal (d.1390) for Henry IV can be found on Wikipedia and his heir also named Nicholas is probably the one in question here. The Carrews held sway over large areas of Kent/Surrey so would have had several tenants and sub-tenants. The mention of Farley and Adyngton (Farleigh and Addington) will arise later when John Cator buys land which passed through the Leigh family and Trecothicks. The Carreus also held Battersea which would come into the ownership of the St.Johns as would Beckenham Manor in the mid 17th century.
See the entry under 1422 when Carreu assigns his property including Bekynham to others. The Carreus would also be connected with Sympson’s in Bromley so refer to “Mercy Carreu” wife of Nicholas later on.

1405 – Beckenham Manor; Death of Elizabeth Bruyn widow of Ingram Bruyn, see Ingram’s death 1400 and 1407 Inquisitions Post Mortem for both Ingram and Elizabeth.

1406 – Thomas Bardolf was declared by Parliament to be a traitor 4 Dec. 1406 and his lands forfeited.[1]

https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/Reports/47FbAAAAQAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=thomas+bardolf+treason&pg=PA358&printsec=frontcover

 Bardolf escaped to France and upon his return was wounded at the Battle of Bramham Moor and died in 1408.

 His honours and lands were forfeited to the Crown by attainder. [3]

"The estates were divided between Thomas Beaufort, 1st Duke of Exeter (the king's half-brother), Sir George de Dunbar, Knight, and the Queen; but the latter's proportion, upon the petition of Sir William Clifford, knt. and his wife, Anne, and Sir William Phelip and his wife, Joan, to the king, was granted in reversion, after the Queen's decease, to those husband's of the attainted nobleman."[3]

 Anne & Joan were his daughters

 Nature of request: Schedule of manors held by Thomas Mortymer in dower for his wife Agnes, of the inheritance of Thomas Bardolf of Wormgay.

Places mentioned: Wormgay, Norfolk; Stowe (Stow Bardolph), Norfolk; Runcton, Norfolk; Fincham, Norfolk; Strumpsagh (Strumpshaw), Norfolk; Cantley, Norfolk; Castre (Caistor), Norfolk; Clopton, Suffolk; Watton at Stone, Hertfordshire; Crowbury, Hertfordshire; Bercomp (Barcombe), Sussex; Birling, Sussex; Wendover, Buckinghamshire; Ruskington, Lincolnshire; Digby, Lincolnshire; Addington, Surrey.

I think we can assume related parts of Beckenham to have been parts of Addington but we believe that Foxgrove continued to be held by Burghersh under his enfeoffment.

Source; https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Bardolf-37#_note-MCA


This summary dated 1439 but referring to actions in 1404 (6 Henry IV) shows  that Bardolf’s lands had been forfeited by his treason and given to Joan the queen of Henry IV. However, the impact upon the occupancy of Foxgrove Manor is probably small as Bartholomew Burghersh or others would continue their ‘sub-tenancy’ under enfeoffments.

1407 – Inquisition Post Mortem of  (date of death 12th August 1400;

INGRAM BRUYN, KNIGHT Writ, plura, 14 Sept. 1407. Inquisition. Brentwood. 22 Sept. He held the manor of South Ockendon with the advowson in fee tail to himself and his heirs male, with successive remainders in default of such heirs to William Marny, knight, and his heirs male, and Maurice Bruyn, knight, and his heirs male. It is held of the countess of Hereford by knight service, annual value £40. The countess is holding it until the full age of the heir in virtue of royal letters patent [CFR 1399–140

5, p.74].
He also held 2 a. in Stifford with the advowson, which were not mentioned in the former inquisition [CIPM XVIII, no.93]. Of whom and by what service they are held, and the annual value are unknown. William Marny, knight, has occupied them and taken the profits, title unknown.
He died on 12 Aug. 1400. Maurice Bruyn, esquire, his son and next heir, was aged 21 years and more on 14 Sept. last. C 137/59, no.52
see 1400 for the inquisition relating to Beckenham Manor descending to Maurice Bruyn at the age of 14.

Writ 20 Sept. 1407. Post Mortem Inquisition. Deptford. 21 Sept. ELIZABETH WIDOW OF INGRAM BRUYN, KNIGHT
She held in dower of the king in chief by knight service after the death of Ingram her husband (d.1400) a third part of the manor of Beckenham of the inheritance of Maurice Bruyn, his son and heir, annual value 40s.
She died on 14 Dec. 1405. Maurice was aged 21 years on 14 Sept. last. William Marny, knight, has held and taken the profits since her death, title unknown. (BHO)
William de Marny was a step-brother-inlaw of Elizabeth Bruyn. Her maiden name was de la Pole.
She also held for life the manor of Rowner with the advowson by the grant of John Marsham, parson of Beckenham, to Ingram Bruyn, Elizabeth herself and his heirs male, with remainder to Maurice Bruyn. It is held of the king by a rent of 40s., annual value £10, and the advowson when it occurs 10 marks.
This last sentence provides the name of the parson of Beckenham at this time.

It would appear that Maurice Bruyn was a minor until 1407 and William de Marny, his father's half brother, was acting as guardian from 1400 to this date. The de Marny’s would have retained the Manors if they had the chance.  Ingram Bruyn seems to have been kept out of his birthright by his stepfather Robert de Marny. Some evidence shows that Robert de Marny was an acquisitive person with quite ruthless methods. The practice of widows being married off quickly to other suitors was apparently often used to obtain property.

BHO and
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=G0OpPhdsTrgC&lpg=RA2-PA59&ots=fSM-3h-s1C&dq=Robert%20de%20marny&pg=RA2-PA59#v=onepage&q=Robert%20de%20marny&f=false

1407 - MAURICE BRUYN

343 Writ de etate probanda. ‡ 23 Sept. 1407 [Maupas].Joan countess of Hereford , who has custody of the lands, should be warned. [Dorse:] She was warned by Robert Waltham and Thomas Berdeney .ESSEX. Proof of age. Horndon on the Hill by South Ockendon. 24 Sept. [Rykedon].

Maurice son and heir of Ingram Bruyn was born at South Ockendon and baptised in the church there on 14 September 1385 , and was therefore aged 21 on 14 Sept. last [sic].The jurors say that they remember this for the reasons given:

John Quynton , aged 45 years and more: Maurice was placed to nurse to the wife of John Jann, carpenter , at Aveley by South Ockendon, and John built him a house at Aveley in that year.

Thomas Turvylle , 54: on the second day after the baptism Maurice was put to nurse at Aveley, and he was sent to the same place by Alice wife of Robert Marny, knight , aunt of Maurice, to see how Maurice was kept and nursed, and he received a gold ring for his trouble.

William Ardale , 49, knows the date by a charter of feoffment of John Smyth by which he bought a croft in Stifford by South Ockendon from John Smyth in that year and had seisin.

John Arundell , 50, was sent on that day by Alice Marny , the aunt, to Robert Marny , then lord of South Ockendon , in London to tell him of the birth, and he was given 20s. for his trouble.

Robert Bolyngton , 50: on that day Alice Wykes (?) granted him 10 a. in Rainham by charter and he had seisin.

John Duddelee , 50, was a servant of Robert Braibrook , then bishop of London , who sent a white palfrey as a gift by him, and Alice Marny gave him 6s.8d. for his trouble.

Edward Caumbre , 60, saw Robert Burton, parson of South Ockendon , the godfather, give Maurice a silver goblet with a gilt cover on the day of the baptism.

Richard Byrle , 49, was at South Ockendon and saw John Broun, goldsmith of London , give Maurice a silver gilt …

John Salman, senior , 60, carried a torch from the manor to the church for the baptism and held it by the font.

William Love , 49, was retained as carpenter on that day by Ingram Bruyn to build a new chamber in the manor of South Ockendon and received 10s. from him.

John Payn , 50, when Maurice was at the church saw Henry Somer driving a cart with a pipe of red wine past the churchyard to the manor and rejoicing and delighting in the birth of Maurice… in such excitement Henry Somer neglected the cart … so that the wine was totally lost.

John Sculle , 48, … was then chief butler of Robert Marny , then lord of South Ockendon , and Robert Est , his clerk of accounts, gave him 10s. for his good services to the godfathers and godmother.

C 137/64/83 mm. 1-2

 

1408 - Easter Term; John Pykenot sues John Clerk, Baker, for 'detinue' (wrongful detention of goods)

1413 - King Henry V until 1422

1414 - See 1389 and 1399 but possibly not connected although the phrase ‘elsewhere in Kent’ may include the lands of Old Court Manor; this appears to be either some exchange of property or reclamation. Fee Simple is a form of freehold title.

 Memorandum of acknowledgment of the foregoing charters and writings at Grenewyche 28 March this year before Simon Gaunstede clerk, by virtue of writs of dedimus potestatem which are upon the chancery file for this year. John Norbury esquire to Salomon Fresthorp, John Eton, Thomas Denton, Nicholas Banastre and Richard Tyrell, their heirs and assigns.

Charter with warranty of all his lands, rents and services in 'Estgrenewiche,' Leuesham, Sippenham and elsewhere in Kent, except the alien priory of Grenewiche and Leuesham and all manors, lands, rents, services, rectories, liberties etc. to that priory belonging, and the keeping of the same. Witnesses: John Mayhewe, Richard Rowe, John Lane, John Fox, John Dey, Robert Adkok, Thomas Fayrewyn. Dated Grenewiche, 25 March 2 Henry V.

 John Halton esquire of Kent, John atte See son and heir of John atte See of Leuesham, John Shelle of Nocolte, John Wolverton of Southwerk, John Fyge and Thomas Wedemere of Bromele co. Kent to John Norbury esquire, his heirs and assigns. Grant of all the lands, rents and services in Leuesham and Sippenham and in the parish of Leuesham which John Halton had jointly with John atte See the father (now deceased) by feoffment of Ralph Stodey, and gave by his charter to John Norbury and Parnell his wife (now deceased) and to the heirs and assigns of John Norbury, by virtue whereof John Norbury is now seised of the same in fee simple; confirmation of his estate therein, and quitclaim of the same, with warranty by John atte See the son. Witnesses: Richard Rowe, Robert Alfrede, Robert Gaunt, Thomas Rede, Edmund Gilbert. Dated 1 December 1 Henry V. Memorandum of acknowledgment by John Fyge and Thomas Wedemere, 14 July this year. (BHO)

 Memorandum of acknowledgment, 12 July. John Fyge and Thomas Wedemere of Bromele co. Kent to John Norbury esquire, his heirs and assigns. Quitclaim of all the lands, rents and services in Sippenham, Leuesham and elsewhere in the parish of Leuesham co. Kent which were of John atte See the father deceased. Witnesses: Richard Rowe, Robert Alfrede, Robert Graunt, Thomas Rede, Edmund Gilbert. Dated 1 December 1 Henry V.

 1415 – Battle of Agincourt

1422 - Memorandum of acknowledgment in chancery at Westminster, 13 February. Nicholas Carreu of Bedyngton co. Surrey esquire to Roger Heroun, John Brymmesgrove clerks, John Martyn, John Cornwaleys, Thomas Hayton, John Gaynesforde and Thomas Herynge, their heirs and assigns. Charter with warranty of the manors of Maythamme and Malmaynes co. Kent with the advowson of the chantry of Malmaynes, and all other his lands, rents, services, heriots, reliefs, suits of court, ways, paths, rights etc. in the towns or parishes of Rolvynden, Smalehythe, Newynden, Losynham, 'Stoke in le Hoo,' Alhalwyn, Ryersshe, Byrelynge, Mallynge, Offham and Bekynham. Witnesses: Edward Guldeforde, Thomas Anger, John Bytlysden, John Sprake, John Peny, John Halle, Thomas Norice. Dated Stoke, Sunday before Allhallows 9 Henry V. (BHO)

If this is held of Malmaynes it may be Langley or near it? Possibly Nicholas Carreu/Carew was father or grandfather of Ann Carew who married Nicholas Leigh of Addington. The Monks Orchard part what becomes Burrell land in the 18th Century belonged to the Addington estates.

1422 - King Henry VI until 1461 deposed in Wars of the Roses

 1423 – This 94 acres is unidentified as Mill Street and Walyngworth Marsh are lost names, but indicate a riverside situation, and the case heard before Dick Whittington?

TNA Ref C 131/227/7 Debtor: Richard Knoweght of Beckenham {Bencham} in [Bromley and Beckenham Hundred] Kent, husbandman.
Creditor: Roger Heron, clerk.
Amount: £300
Before whom: Richard Whittington, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster.
Writ to: Sheriff of Kent
Sent by: Chancery.

Endorsement: Richard Knoweght was not found in the bailiwick. The Sheriff has delivered to Roger Heron the goods and chattels, lands and tenements.
Inquisition and return: Date to be returned: 13.10.1423 The Sheriff replied to an earlier writ that Richard Knoweght was not found in the bailiwick but
he held in fee on 29 June and afterwards a messuage in the parish of Beckenham, an adjacent garden, a dove-cot, a garden at Mill Street next to the tenement
of Robert Smythiet, 26 acres of arable. 44 acres of uncultivated land and 24 acres of pasture in the marsh called Walyngworth Marsh, worth £11 8s. a year.
He has 6 horses, 10 cows, 200 sheep, and 6 pigs worth £32 6s. 8d. 1423 Apr 28


1424 - Court of Common Pleas;
Trinity 1424. Caulston also spelt Cawstone. The taking of the servant Syreed junior may indicate an indentured servant?
The Cawston name is present in Beckenham into the 17th Century on parish registers.

d

1353

Kent

Caulston, John, of Bekenham

Syreed, John, sen, of Croydon, husbandman

trespass: taking servant, Syreed junior



1427 - Court of Common Pleas; Hilary Term; Robert More, butcher, is brought up in two cases of debt
Surrey debt Meldon, Nicholas, executors of; (Gilberd, John; Burton, Hugh) More, Robert, of Bekenham, Kent, butcher
London debt Mollesley, John Couper, William, of Coventry, drover; More, Robert, of Bekenham, Kent, butcher; Burdon, John, of Coventry, butcher

1432 and 1439 - Kelsey; The records in other publications for anyone connected with Kelsey called Kelshulle are not referenced but these wills are the likely source of any
 information probably in Latin and not generally available in any transcript we are seeking further information from P.Luffenam’s publication.
Kelshull, William (alias Convers)Beckenham? 1439 |P Luffenam 26 | m; St.Nicholas Cold Abbey, London (St.Saviours, Bermondsey)
Kelshyll, John (thelder), Beckenham (Bekyinham) 1432 |P Luffenam 17 | m; St. Margarets, Bryggestret, London

1432 - Easter Term; Court of Common Pleas;

Kent
trespass: close Langwyth, John Cheseman, John, of Bekenham, husbandman
Kent trespass: assault Fordham, Thomas Cheseman, Thomas, of Bekynham, husbandman
The relationship of the Chesemans is not known but both brought before the court . Langwyth appears in other references. Fordham isn't necessarily a  Beckenham resident/landowner.


1433 - Easter Term; 
Essex Erithe, John, of Wolwich, Kent, gent Ricard, John; Rand, Robert, of Eltham; Langley, Ralph; Wolcy, William; Shotte, Henry; atte John, Nasshe, of Wykham; Cook, William; Wodeman, John, of Bokenham; Holestyr, William; atte Lake, Thomas; Merfyn, Robert, of Eltham, gent; Wodecok, John, of Eltham, yeoman; atte Ree, Richard, of Eltham, yeoman decies tantum (Statute 38 Edw. III, st. 1 c. 12)
Ralph Langley and John Wodeman mentioned here are in other references. the statute of decies tantum is an old one related to the taking of money or bribes by witnesses. 
Whether this relates to the oaths taken as mentioned by Philipot we cannot say thus far. See 1437 where Wolcy acquires land from Langwyth and his wife. John Langwyth is described as a London Tailor
in other references where he seeks to recover debts. Nasshe of Wykham is probably of the area now known as Nash adjacent to Coney Hall.


1433/4 - Langley;
Philipot had stated about Langley:
"though the (Langley) Family be withered away and gone, the last of which Name at this place was Ralph Langley, who with Roger
Twisden, Stephen Monins, Edward Monins, John Edingham
 or Engham, Richard Edingham, John Berton of Cotmanton in Shouldon,
John Berham, John Betenham
 of Shurland in Pluckley, and others, Gentlemen of prime Rank in this County, were summoned to appear
before Robert Poynings and John Perry, in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth,(1434) to disclaim the Title
of the House of York, and this Ralph died in the year 1451,"

1437 - Court of Common Pleas records. It is tempting to believe this may relate to what became Woolsey's Farm at Clay Hill. (subject to proof).
Wolcy is acquiring land from Langwyth and it is tempting to associate Langwyth with Langley/Langele as a family name.


CP 25/1/115/311, number 439.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One week from Holy Trinity, 15 Henry VI [2 June 1437].

Parties:

William Wolcy, querent, and John Langwyth' and Ellen, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 40 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow, 20 acres of wood and 11 pence of rent in Bekynham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

John and Ellen have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of William, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Ellen to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

William has given them 40 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

William Wolsey, John Langwith, Ellen Langwith

Places:

Beckenham

See 1466 will of John Langwyth who still has land in Beckenham perhaps illustrating that this foot of fine is for a lease or for only part of Langwyth’s land?

 

1437 - Property at Westerham but recorded here in case John and Lucy Longe turn up elsewhere?

CP 25/1/115/312, number 461.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One week from the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 15 Henry VI [9 February 1437]. And afterwards two weeks from Easter, 16 Henry VI [27 April 1438].

Parties:

William Twyford', querent, and John Longe of Bekenham and Lucy, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 18 acres of land, 3 acres of wood and a moiety of 1 acre of meadow in Westram.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

John and Lucy have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of William, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Lucy to him and his heirs for ever.

For this:

William has given them 20 marks of silver.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

William Twyford, John Long, Lucy Long

Places:

Beckenham, Westerham

1438 – see 1437 John Langwith and Wolcy. We associated Wolcy with Woolseys Farm but this Langwyth property has different acreages. Also Langwyth is now the querant whereas he was deforciant in the earlier Fine showing that he disposed of the earlier property and acquired this larger one?

Foot of Fine; Court of Common Pleas, property to be identified but Waleys is connected with Foxgrove. Foxgrove was on the Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham border with outlying parts as far as Hayes and West Wickham.

CP 25/1/115/313, number 479.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Two weeks from St Hilary, 17 Henry VI [27 January 1439].

Parties:

John Langwyth'Thomas Peny and Otes (Oto) Trethek', querents, and William Waleys of London', skinner, and Katherine, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 1 toft, 40 acres of land, 1 acre of meadow, 100 acres of wood and 20 shillings of rent in BekenhamHeseBromleyLeuesham and Wykham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

William and Katherine have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of John, as those which John, Thomas and Otes have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Katherine to John, Thomas and Otes and the heirs of John for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

John, Thomas and Otes have given them 100 marks of silver.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

John Langwith, Thomas Penny, Otes Trethick, William Wales, Katherine Wales (Waleys sometimes interpreted as Wallis)

Places:

London, Beckenham, Hayes, Bromley, Lewisham, East Wickham (or [most certainly] West Wickham)

1438 – Sympson’s Place and other properties; Memorandums of acknowledgment. (Quitclaim and Charter of Demise) Lands acquired by Nicholas Carreu first mentioned in 1403 and 1422. As the lands encompassed Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham, Chiselhurst and Hayes see 1487 where William Brograve of Kelsey acquires land from Stanlowe and his wife mentioned here. Carreu had land from Malmaynes estates. This may later constitute part or all of the Kelsey estate under Brograve but we have no way of accurately identifying the property. It is said to include Sympson’s Place prior to acquiring that name under Robert Sympson.

Thomas Panter, Stephen Proctour clerk, George Boys, John Rose and Robert Blundell to John Stanlow, Margaret his wife, John Brokley citizen and alderman of London, Thomas de Haydoke, John de Wode citizen and mercer of London, Thomas Quyne and John Deleawe, and to the heirs and assigns of the said John Stanlow and Margaret. Charter of demise of all the lands, rents and services, woods etc. in Bromlegh, Bekenham, Leuesham, Cheselhurst and Hese which the grantors had by demise and feoffment of Mercy who was wife of Nicholas Carreu, Thomas Lewkenore knight, William Selman, Henry Severe clerk, Thomas Heryng and John Bourneforde, and of a parcel of land at Sparowe in the parish of Orpyngton containing 16 acres called 'Sharpeslonde' with the wood growing thereupon. Witnesses: Reynold Cobham, Thomas Keriell knights, Richard Wodevile esquire, William Garnet, Robert Mirfyn, Nicholas Sibyle, John Fereby, Roger Appulton, Thomas Couper. Dated Bromlegh, 4 May 17 Henry VI. (BHO and Calendar of Close Rolls)

1438 - Thomas Leukenore knight to John Stanlowe, Margaret his wife, John Brokley citizen and alderman of London, Thomas de Haydoke, John de Wode citizen and mercer of London, Thomas Quyne and John Deleawe and to the heirs and assigns of John Stanlowe and Margaret. Quitclaim of all the lands, rents and services, woods etc. in Bromlegh, Bekenham, Leuesham, Cheselhurst and Hese which Mercy who was wife of Nicholas Carreu, William Selman, Henry Severe clerk, Thomas Heryng, John Bourneford and Thomas Leukenore, with John Hale and John Perueys both now deceased, had by demise and feoffment of John Fray, Henry Frowyk, Robert Otteley, Miles Skulle, John Abbot, Thomas Catworth, Everard Flete, John Grace, John atte Legh and Richard Billyngburgh, and of a parcel of land at Sparowe in the parish of Orpyngton called 'Sharpeslond' containing 16 acres with the wood growing thereupon. Witnesses: Reynold Cobham, Thomas Keriell knights, Richard Wodevile esquire, William Garnet, Robert Mirfyn, Nicholas Sybyle, John Fereby, Roger Appulton, Thomas Couper. Dated 3 June 17 Henry VI.

1438 - Mercy late the wife of Nicholas Carreu widow, Thomas Lewkenore knight, Henry Severe clerk, William Selman, Thomas Heryng and John Bornefforde to Thomas Pantere, Stephen Proctour clerk, George Boys, John Rose and Robert Bloundell of Bromlegh co. Kent, their heirs and assigns. Quitclaim of all the lands, rents, services, woods etc. in Bromley, Bekynham, Leuesham, Chisilhurst, Hese and Orpyngton co. Kent, which they had by charter of feoffment of the said Mercy and the others. Dated 15 October 17 Henry VI.[1438]

This last one assigning the land to Thomas Pantere etc. source; BHO and Calendar of Close Rolls

1438 – neighbouring properties; The mention of Greenwich and East Greenwich may connect this with Old Court Manor and the small property near Langley?

1442 – Manor of Sydenham (Sippenham) Monday next after the Feast of S. Faith, Virgin [6 Oct.].

Welles (fn. 1) (John), grocer, and Alderman of the City of London.— To be buried in the chapel of SS. John the Baptist and John the Evangelist which he built in the church of S. Antonin. Bequest for observance of his obit and those of Margery his late wife and others for the space of thirty years next after his decease, specific sums of the bequest being paid by the Wardens of the Mistery and Commonalty of Grocers of the City of London to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Swordbearer of the City, and to each of the three Wardens of the Grocers attending his obit. Among other bequests are the following:—For the new making and erection of a certain standard in Westchepe, (fn. 2) the boundary of his ward, fifty marks; twenty pounds sterling for the repair of aqueduct and conduit, and a similar sum for the repair of London Bridge. His feoffees of lands and tenements in Tourestrete are directed to make a good estate in the same to the Wardens of the Mistery and Commonalty of the Grocers of the City of London, for the relief of the poor of the mistery, living in a newly erected tenement near their hall in the parish of S. Mildred in the Poultry, so that the said wardens duly observe his obit. Certain lands and tenements in the parishes of S. Mary Magdalen near the Old Fish Market, S. Peter near Pouleswharf, S. Michael de Pateraosterchirche in the Riole, and S. Swithun in Candelwykstrete to be sold for pious and charitable uses, and his feoffees in trust of the same to make a good title to the purchaser. His manor of Sippenham in the parish of Leuesham, co. Kent, to be likewise sold, saving an annuity of forty shillings to William Osbarn. His leasehold mansion and shop in the parish of S. Antonin to be sold to some honest man of his mistery and the proceeds devoted to pious and charitable uses. Dated London, 7 June, A.D. 1442.
Roll 171 (2). (BHO)

We include this manor of Sydenham / Sippenham / Cydenham as it occurs in connection with some Beckenham landlords such  as the Styles and some parts may adjoin Kent House. Later John Cator also acquires some land in Sydenham.

1442 - Court of Common Pleas; Hilary Term/

Kent

debt

Yerd, John, esq

Goore, Walter, of Adesham, husbandman; Chamberleyn, Thomas, vicar of Rochester St Nicholas; atte Neder, Richard, of Bekenham, husbandman; Chaloner, Richard, of Tenterden, husbandman; Abbot, John, junior, of Bekenham, husbandman; Hancok, John, of Tenterden, husbandman; Cropwode, John, parson of Cheryton

1444 - Hilary Term case; Langwyth sues Causton, 


Kent
trespass: threat of violence Langwyth, John Causton, Thomas, of Bekenham; Ellen his wife

See 1437 property feet of fines and 1466 Langwith's will. Causton with spelling variations Cawston appears in other references for land, feet of fines, and wills.

1449 – Beckenham, small messuage transfer.

CP 25/1/116/322, number 713.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

The day after the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 27 Henry VI [3 February 1449].

Parties:

Philip Alisaunder, querent, and Peter Napper and Joan, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 2 acres of land and 1 acre of meadow in Bekenham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Peter and Joan have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Philip, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

Philip has given them 20 marks of silver.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

Philip Alexander, Peter Napper, Joan Napper

Places:

Beckenham

1450 – Jack (John) Cade’s Rebellion

A roll containing pardons for the followers of Jack Cade includes men from the Parish of Beckenham. This Latin transcription with shorthand and some errors has been translated into English

 

"Phus Aleysaunder, Rohtus Davie, Rohtus Rose, Thomas Fytyll, Witts Caweston, Ricus Pyknote, Johes Dawe, Johes Umfrey, Rohtus Langlev, Ricus Langley, Thomas Dawe, Johes Halston, Johes Kyng, Johes Beton, Witts Plege, Johes Ayleraer, Johes Whode, Radus Mason, et Johes John, seruantelangge, de parochia de Bekynham, " Robtus Payn, de Bekenliam, husbondman ;' et Andreas Wodecock, de Bromley, husbondman, constabularij hund' de Bromley et Bekenam. " Johes Yorke, alias Johes Kelyng, de parochia de Bekenam, senior, husb. ; Johes de Yorke, alias Johes Kelyng, de parochia de Bekenam, husbondman; Johes Middey, de parochia de Bekenam, husb.; et Witts Middey, de parochia de Bekenam, husb., et in hund de Bromeley et Bekenam, ac omnes, etc.

 

Translation; Philip Alexaunder, Robert Davie, Robert Rose, Thomas Fytyll(Fythel), William Caweston, Richard Pyknote, John Dawe, John Umfrey(Humfrey), Robert Langley, Richard Langley, Thomas Dawe, John Halston, John Kyng, John Beton, William Plege, John Aylmer, John Whode(Wood?), Ralph Mason, and John Johnservantlangge  of the parish of Bekynham, Robert Payn of Bekenham, husbondman and Andrew Wodecock of Bromley husbondman and constable of the Hundred of Bromley and Bekenham. John York alias John Kelyng of the Parish of Bekenam husbondman, John Midday of the parish of Bekenam husbondman and William Midday of the parish of Bekenam husbondman and in the Hundred of Bromley and Bekenham a comnes etc. (and all others in the Hundred....)

 

 

Richard Langley or Langle was probably the son of Ralph Langle of Beckenham who bequeathed by his will of 1453 proved at Rochester 3s and 4d to the new bells of Beckenham church. John King snr and John King (jnr) probably father and son as well.

Several of the family names appear in the first burial records from 1539 ie. King, Pledge, Cawston, Dawe, Davye.  The only Langley recorded in burials is Ursula Langley and one Margery Midday. Eylmer or Aylmer have either moved from the parish or are buried in another parish. Fytyll looks like Fythel from the Lay Subsidy. The name can be spelt Fithel as in fitheler which is a player of stringed instruments eg fiddler.  That’s not assuming that was his profession as some Fythels are recorded as leathersellers. In the Lay Subsidy Richard Fythel has some wealth but is low in the rankings at about 1percent of the total collected. (source; Hevey)

Husbondman or husbandman is the old word for a farmer below the rank of yeoman. A husbandman usually held his land by copyhold or leasehold tenure and may be regarded as the ‘average farmer in his locality’. The words ‘yeoman’ and ‘husbandman’ were gradually replaced in the later 18th and 19th centuries by ‘farmer’.

Some names can be traced in the Kent Roll of 1274 and the Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334. They would of course be ancestors of these in 1450

 (sources Robert Borrowman and Patent Rolls of Henry VI)

1451 – Langley; Hasted stated and quoted Philipot; “Ralph Langley of Langley died in the year 1451, and ordered Langley and other demeasns at Bekenham to be sold for the discharging his Debts, the purport and Effects of which Will were accordingly performed, and his Estate at Bekenham and Langley, passed away by Sale to John Violett, whose Successors enjoyed it until the Beginning of Henry. the eighth,(1509) and then it was conveyed to John Stiles Esq; who much inlarged the House with a supply of Buildings, and from him is it by Descent devolved to be the instant Possession of his Successor Sir Humphrey Stiles Knight and Baronet.(d1552)” 

Philipot had stated about Langley: "the name and place: before the going out of Edward the third,(1377) I find the Propriety invested by Sale in Langley, to which Family the Foundation of that House owes in part its Original, on which they ingraffed their own Name, which hath flourished under that Title ever since, though the Family be withered away and gone, the last of which Name at this place was Ralph Langley, who with Roger Twisden, Stephen Monins, Edward Monins, John Edingham or Engham, Richard Edingham, John Berton of Cotmanton in Shouldon, John Berham, John Betenham of Shurland in Pluckley, and others, Gentlemen of prime Rank in this County, were summoned to appear before Robert Poynings and John Perry, in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth,(1434) to disclaim the Title of the House of York, and this Ralph died in the year 1451, and ordered Langley and other demeasns at Bekenham to be sold for the discharging his Debts, the purport and Effects of which Will were accordingly performed, and his Estate at Bekenham and Langley, passed away by Sale to John Violett,"

The family name of Langley appears in the 1274 Kent Roll (Langel) and 1334 Lay Subsidy Roll which is before the 1377 date which Philipot states and whether the family had not acquired the "Langley" estate until 1377 remains a question. But the Lay Subsidy Rolls indicate substantial wealth held by a few members of the family. Robert Borrowman states that Ralph Langley’s will is dated 1453 in which he leaves a bequest to pay for the bells of the church.

1452 - Close Rolls Henry VI; Property to be identified but other mentions of Mottingman and  Eltham are in this timeline.

1453 - Elmers End area possibly as the Humphrey family held land there for several generations. But this Fine (Final accord) transfers property to Neder.

CP 25/1/293/72, number 376.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Surrey. Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Two weeks from Easter, 31 Henry VI [15 April 1453].

Parties:

Richard Neder, querent, and William Humfrey and Joan, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

A moiety of 4 acres of land in Croydon' in the county of Surrey and a moiety of 2 messuages, of 32 acres of land, of 6 acres of meadow and of 8 acres of wood in Bekenham in the county of Kent.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

William and Joan have acknowledged the moieties to be the right of Richard, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to him and his heirs for ever.

For this:

Richard has given them 20 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

Richard Needer, William Humphrey, Joan Humphrey

Places:

Croydon, Beckenham

1453 - The same property as the previous item, raises the question how is changed from Neder to Payn?

CP 25/1/293/72, number 377.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent. Surrey.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One month from Easter, 31 Henry VI [29 April 1453].

Parties:

Robert Payn' of Bekenham and Isolt, his wife, and John Chapman, querents, and Philip Rough'hede and Agnes, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

A moiety of 2 messuages, of 32 acres of land, of 6 acres of meadow and of 8 acres of wood in Bekenham in the county of Kent and a moiety of 4 acres of land in Croydon' in the county of Surrey.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Philip and Agnes have acknowledged the moieties to be the right of John, as those which John, Robert and Isolt have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Agnes to Robert and Isolt and John and the heirs of John for ever.

For this:

Robert and Isolt and John have given them 10 pounds sterling.

 

1453 - Beckenham / Surrey borders with Battersea tempts us to think this in the Penge area

CP 25/1/293/72, number 381.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Surrey. Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One week from St Michael, 32 Henry VI [6 October 1453].

Parties:

Simon Terry, querent, and Nicholas Mason' and Ellen, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

10 acres of land in Bokenham in the county of Surrey and 1 messuage and 10 acres of land in Batersey in the county of Kent.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Nicholas and Ellen have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Simon, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Ellen to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

Simon has given them 20 marks of silver.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

Simon Terry, Nicholas Mason, Ellen Mason

Places:

Beckenham (in Kent), Battersea (in Surrey)


1455 / 1487 The Wars of the Roses, main period although some conflict outside of this period

1456 - Katherine heir of Richard Shotte conveyed lands in Beckenham, Wickham & Hayes to John Hever[1]. Later in 1472[2] 1485[3]1495[4] Memorandum of acknowledgment, 4 February. See 1466 Pickhurst

1456 – John Style of London; is witness to this donation or will. Only noted because the ‘John Style’ of Langley is still in some debate and this may be early evidence of John. I estimate that this ‘John Style’ would be too old (over 20years) in 1456 to be the John Style dying in 1505 (at over 70) leaving a young family. It  does not discount the possibility of it being a relative.

Robert Shirborne citizen and 'draper' of London, to Thomas bishop of London, his executors and assigns. Gift of all his goods and chattels in London and elsewhere within the realm, and all debts to him due; and he has put the bishop in possession thereof by delivery of his cup called a 'nwtt' ornamented with silver gilt to William Kesburgh to the bishop's use, in presence of Robert Lumpner, William Taverner 'gentilman,' William Kesburgh and William Parys citizens of London, John Style etc. Dated 23 October, 35 Henry VI.(BHO)

1456 – Causton’s name appears elsewhere in this account and this is a dispute between his tenants York and Abbott and presumably a sub-tenant? See 1500 where Causten/Causton acquires more property.
TNA Ref;
C 1/26/190 Short title: Wareham v York.
Plaintiffs: Thomas Wareham. Defendants: John York and John Abbott, feoffees for William Causton.
Subject: Messuage, land, etc in Beckenham (Bekenham).
Kent. 3 documents date;1456-1460

And: TNA ref C 1/26/186 Short title: Causton v Causton. Plaintiffs: William Causton.
Defendants: Thomas Causton and Richard Neder, feoffees.
Subject: Messuage, land, etc in Beckenham (Bekenham). Kent. 4 documents date; 1456-1460
Whether between father and son Causten or between two brothers is unknown?

 

1456 – Will of Robert Payne; 10 Marcii 1456 Robertus Payne de Bekinham Com Kane. Roffen div. Sep in cum. eccl Sancti Georgii de B. Sum alt. 3/4 Lego ad opus necessarum eccl. pdict 6/8. Lego ad emendacoen Sancti Georgii xxd. Lego lum. Sanct Crucis xxd. Lum. Sce Marie 12d. Lum sce Katerine ?vd. Lum ?SceNichi and Sce Marie Magdalene 12d. Ad emendacon vie contra le Borows 20d ?Audt Sacerd in die sep. mee 4d. Lego vicario de Batrissay 3/4. Resed. in custodian and gubern Johannis Symmys als Chapman semoris and Isotam uxorem meum exececs. to disp for my sold. Testz Dno Will. Masseham rectore ?ibm Roberto Hamond Thoma Wy Thoma Causton.
   This is the last Wil of Robert Payne of Bekinham the xth day of March made that the church of Bromlegh shall have 6/8. Item the chirch of the Loe 6/8. Item to the church of Depford 6/8 To the church of Grenewiche 3/4. To the chirch of Charleton 3/4, of Cheselhurst 3/4, of Levesham 3/4, of Batsey 3/4. 
   Also the feoffees shall sille the lands and make delivey unto myne executours to fulfil my will. This is my will also tht myne sufeoffers shall selle lond and woode to pay all myne bequests that be myne enfeoffours Robert Hamond Robert Humfrey and John Pleggy be sufeoffed in Bromelegh pish. Item myne other Enfeoffours being Robert Hamond John Chappeman the Elder and John Musard of the Lee. First and foremyst Robert John and John shall fulfil the covenints that is between Robert Payne and Stephen Levendale of Motingham of the Londes that is in the pish of Lee Vndir this condicion and if it like hym not the said Payne to give him a nother a Chapman or his assigners. In wittenes of this writing being Thomas Cawston John Keling Thos Marchall als Lee and John Dawe taylor and many other. And myne Executours to do for me as I wold do for them.
Prob. 12 May 1457. by exors named.

(source; Kent Archaeology)

 Several names of those mentioned in the will or witnesses to documents occur on more than one occasion, Dawe, Plegg, Causton. And Hammond, Humfrey and Plegg(Pledge) are names recorded later in Beckenham burial register although this will is nearly 100 years before church records are kept. The name Will(iam) Masseham rectore could be a transcription error or variation for William Malham who was rector of Beckenham from 1446 to 1457. The implications of property being enfeoffed, subfeoffed etc add further complications to the will. Refer to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feoffment  

 
1457/8 - Probate of will of William Plegge, of Beckenham with bequest of 20 shillings to his daughter, Elinor when she becomes of marriageable age. Will: 16 November 1457, codicil: 20 November 1457, probate:18 March 1458. In the event of her death before this time the money to remain with his sons John and William. Bequests of land to his sons and his brother John Plegge (field names; Tomsowtravis, Sunteriscrofte, Nether Somerfeld, Thoambrooke, Suthereden, Jennycokkescrofte) The will is in the vernacular the codicil in Latin, by which he appoints his wife Agnes and brother John, executors (adjoining Crouch Oak)

(source; BHC 167/1)

1458 - Hilary Term; a case for recovery of debt.  John York(e), Midday and  Cawston appear in other records  and some later Cawstons in burials after 1539. Husbandman denotes a tenant farmer.

Causton, Thomas Nether, Richard, of Bekenham, husbandman; Abbot, John, of Bekenham, husbandman; York, John, of Bekenham, husbandman; Midday, John, of Bekenham, carpenter

London

debt

Broke, William, yeoman of the crown; Huet, John, gent; Smyth, Joan, gentlewoman

Claver, John, of London, fruiterer; of Yorke, John, of Bekenham, Kent, yeoman

London

debt

Broke, William, yeoman of the crown; Huet, John, gent; Smyth, Joan, gentlewoman

Claver, John, of London, fruiterer; of Yorke, John, of Bekenham, Kent, yeoman

London

debt

Broke, William, yeoman of the crown; Huet, John, gent; Smyth, Joan, gentlewoman

of Yorke, John, of Bekenham, Kent

1461 - King Edward IV until 1483 (see March, Battle of Towton)

1461 Beckenham Manor described by Philipot and Hasted: The Death of Sir Henry Bruin of South Ockenden and Beckenham Manor, his two Daughters and Coheirs about the Beginning of Edward the fourth, (1461) divided his Inheritance, each of them having a first and second Husband:(Philipot). Hasted lists three husbands each as do some modern chroniclers. So Philipot misses one husband each and Hasted has the wrong order for Alice. See the writ or inspeximus transcription below and 1486. Also, the story about Sir Charles Brandon has defied confirmation.

Alice the eldest was first married to Robert Harleston of Essex Esquire, and after to Sir Thomas Heveningham; and Hasted adds William Berners but this should be John Berners who was in fact the first husband.

Elizabeth second Daughter was wedded first to Thomas Tirrell of Heron in Essex Esquire, and after his Decease to Sir William Brandon Knight, who was Standard-bearer to Henry the seventh at Bosworth Field, (1485) where he was stain in asserting his Cause and Quarrel against Richard the third, and he had Issue by her Sir Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, the Flower and perfection of English Chivalrie in his Time, who sometimes kept his Residence at this place, (not as Proprietarie, but onely as Lessee, for the Sole Inheritance upon the Division of Bruin's Estate accrued to Tirrell;).

Hasted lists William Mallory, Brandon then Tirrell (of Herne) but later chroniclers have Tirrell, then Brandon and Mallory. Tirrell has also been spelt Tyrrel and the History of Essex by Thomas Wright is a source of their lineage. The next entry “Inspeximus” etc. lists the husbands and children/heirs as well as other Inquisitions Post Mortem.

This transcription of a writ of diem clausit extremum dated 15 Feb.,1 Edw. IV (1461) : From a 1486 Inspeximus seemingly at the widowhood of Elizabeth Brandon nee Bruyn.
Inspeximus and exemplification, at the instance of Elizabeth Brandon, widow, of the following documents:—(l.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 15 Feb.,1 Edw. IV (1461). (Inq. 1 Edw. IV. No. 27), directed to John Grene, escheator of Kent, upon the death of Henry Bruyn, Knt. (2.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromley, co. Kent, on Saturday, 20 Feb, 1 Edw. IV.,before John Grene, the escheator, by the oaths of Richard Nether, Thomas Dawe, John Mydday, Wlliam Myddey, John Plegge, John Yorke, Henry Lapworth,Thomas Bedyll, Henry Violet, Robert Blundell, Simon Kechill, and Robert Thorp, setting forth that Henry Bruyn, knt., was seized of the manor of Beckenham, alias Beghenham (fully described), with the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one knights fee; and that he died 30 Nov.last; and that Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Tyrell, esq.,aged 17 years, and Alice, wife of John Berners, aged 19 years, are his daughters and heirs. (3.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 18 March, 13 Edw. IV.(1474) (Inq. 13 Edw. IV. No. 59), directed to John Brode, escheator of Kent, upon the death of Alice, wife of John Hevenyngham, knt. (4.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromlegh, co. Kent, 11 Nov, 13 Edw. IV., before John Brode, the elder, the escheator, by the oaths of John Kyere, Thomas Kyng, Simon Keehill, Henry Violet, Alexander Curteys, Stephen Kete, John Plegge, Robert Humfrey, Philip Alexander, Robert Pope, John Dare Taillour, William Bradfote, and Richard Kyng, setting forth that Alice Hevenyngham was seized of the moiety of the manor of Beghenham, and the moiety of the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one fourth part of a knights fee, and married successively John Berners, esq. (by whom she had issue John Berners), Robert Harleston esq. (by whom she had likewise issue), and John Hevenyngham,knt. (by whom she had issue George Hevenyngham),and that she died 15 Feb., 12 Edw. IV.;(1473) and that the said John Hevenyngham now holds the premises; and that the before-mentioned John Berners is her son and next heir, and is of the age of 10 years. Pat. p. 3. m. 5 (23).

The sections above related to Alice and Elizabeth, their marriages, deaths and heirs should be in later timeline milestones but here they help to understand the descent of Beckenham Manor from the Bruyns to the Tyrells via Elizabeth and to Heveningham via Alice although Heveningham gives way to Harleston’s heir a little later. The Wars of the Roses and various alliances have some effect on the passage of property. Some of the witnesses's names to  the inquisition taken at Bromley(Bromlegh) occur in other references; Kyng, Curteys, Violet, Humfrey.

1461 - 29th March; Battle of Towton, Wars of the Roses; A victory for the Yorkists. Edward IV displaced Henry VI

1461 – Marriage of Elizabeth Bruyn to Thomas Tyrrell who dies later in 1473. Subsequently some time before 4 November 1474/1475 Elizabeth remarries to William Brandon.  Henry was the son of Sir Maurice Bruyn. Elizabeth had married Tyrell before 17 February 1461/1462, and he died  c. 13 October 1473,  She was a granddaughter of Sir Maurice Bruyn (d. 1466), and daughter and co-heiress of Sir Henry Bruyn (d. 1461) by Elizabeth Darcy (died c. 1471), daughter of Sir Robert Darcy of Maldon, Essex. On her father's side Elizabeth Bruyn was descended from Sir William le Brune, Knight Chamberlain to King Edward I. After William Brandon's death at the Battle of Bosworth on 22 August 1485, she married William Mallory or Mallery, Esq., whom she survived. She died 7 or 26 March 1493/1494.  As co-heiress to Beckenham  Manor she  carried  half of the manor  which eventually would follow the Tyrell  line.

This legend from the 1623 Beckenham Manor Map, copied in 1768, shows the almost identical acreages of the two halves of Beckenham Manor (467 against 469 acres) and the part which is later leased separately, see 1623

1461 – (23 December) Langley?; G.W.Tookey notes a record from Kent Archive that Stephen Fabian acquired lands formerly belonging to Ralph Langley.

1461/65 – Foxgrove, according to Philipot, is in the possession of the John Grene/Greene and his family. (John Grene is probably the same as the one who is escheator for Kent see the earlier 1461 Bruyn impeximus). Philipot states; Foxgrove is the last place of Account in this Parish,…….. it was conveyed to Vaux of the County of North-Hampton, and there made its abode untill the latter End of Henry the sixth (1461), and then it was alienated to John Grene Esquire, and he died possest of it in fourth year of Edward the fourth (1465); and in this Family did the Title reside, untill the Beginning of Henry the eighth (1509), and then it was demised to Beversea,

See 1478 where Thomas Grene is described as having leased Foxgrove to Walter Fitz for 7 shillings rent.  Beversea has defied any identification but we believe we have found an alternative account because Philipot and afterwards, Hasted, have Vaux and Greene in the wrong order of possession complicated by the fact that Greene’s widow marries a Middleton and the Vaus/Vaux family and Parr family are related. Searching this account for “Foxgrove” should help follow the transfers of the estate.3

1463 - Hilary Term;

debt London Langwyth, John, of London Norys, John, of Bromlegh, Kent, husbandman
debt London Langwyth, John, of London Norys, John, of Bromlegh, Kent, husbandman; Chappeman, John, of Bokenham, Kent, husbandman

John Langwyth a London Tailor and his wife Ellen are recorded in numerous cases seeking payment of debts and is defendant in a few cases ie trespass, so can we assume  he attempts to get repayment by seizing property? See also 1475

1465 - Foot of Fine; Lewisham but perhaps in connection with the item in 1466 'John Massam and Margery'. There is a temptation to research a connection with Aleyn School. The Massams are disposing of their land which had possibly been joined on the Beckenham/Penge/Lewisham/Sydenham? borders.

CP 25/1/117/332, number 52.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Two weeks from St John the Baptist, 5 Edward IV [8 July 1465]. And afterwards one week from St Michael in the same year [6 October 1465].

Parties:

John Aleyn', citizen and goldsmith of the city of London', querent, and John Massam and Margery, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

7 acres of meadow in Leuesham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

John Massam and Margery have acknowledged the meadow to be the right of John Aleyn', as that which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed it from themselves and the heirs of Margery to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

John Aleyn' has given them 20 marks of silver.


Persons:

John Allen, John Massam, Margery Massam

Places:

London, Lewisham

1466 - Foot of Fine; Court of Common Pleas, property to be identified. But we assume Beckenham / Penge borders.

CP 25/1/294/74, number 33.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent. Surrey.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

The day after the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 5 Edward IV [3 February 1466].

Parties:

Thomas Wareham and William Nele, clerk, querents, and John Massam and Margery, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage and 12 acres of land in Bekenham in the county of Kent and 2 messuages, 24 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow and 3 acres of wood in Peynge in the parish of Batersey in the county of Surrey.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

John and Margery have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Thomas, as those which Thomas and William have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Margery to Thomas and William and the heirs of Thomas for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

Thomas and William have given them 60 pounds sterling.


Persons:

Thomas Wareham, William Neal, John Massam, Margery Massam

Places:

Beckenham, Penge (in Battersea)


1466 - Pickhurst Green mentioned in this inquisition; Katherine Shotte, daughter and heir of Richard Shotte, to John Hever, John Kechell and Richard Alyn, their heirs and assigns. Quitclaim with warranty of a messuage with curtilage and garden in the parish of Hese (Hayes) co. Kent between land of Simon Kechell on the north and west, land of the heirs of Thomas Frensshe on the south and a common pasture called 'Pykherst grene' on the east, of four fields called 'Menefeld, Mapull croft, Frithfeld and Litill Frithfeld,' and a grove of wood called 'Menefeldes grove' lying together there between land of Richard Shotte of Hese and the heirs of John Lambe on the north, of Simon Kechell on the south, William Frensshe and John Chapman of Bekenham on the east, and a wood called 'Wykham Frith' on the west, and of a croft called 'Solefelde' there between land of John Broun on the north, 'Solelane' on the south and east, and land of John Hever on the west. Dated 4 February, 5 Edward IV. (source: BHO)

This is one of many connections with surrounding areas such as Hayes and West Wickham. Lysons mentions the supposed manors of Pickhurst or Heaver(Hever) in Hayes. Although technically outside of Beckenham this borders Langley to the north and Wickham Green on the west and understanding links with areas outside of Beckenham clarifies some situations.

1860’s OS map to illustrate Pickhurst Green “on the east”

1466 - Will of John Langewith citezein or taillor of London. 4 Dec 1466 and 6 yere of the Reigne of King Edward the iiijth (IV). To be buried in the pish chirch of Saint Marye Abbechirch of London that is to say under the psbitery of the pe high aulter before the ymage of Saint John Baptist there To h. aulter 6/8. Unto the said chirch a small bell called a cryer according unto pe Ring of the iiij belles nowe there being.
   I will and utterly charge all such psones as of trust been eufeoffed with me in all my londys etc in the pissh of Bekenham in Kent at such tyme as they shall resonabely be required by Eleyn my wife shall make a sufficient astate in the lawe accordey as can be thought by lerned counsaill therin to be doon to the same Eleyn to her and hir heires for ever more to thentent that she shall dispose thereof as shall seme best aff her discrecn for both our soules
   Also with such goodes as I have to find an honest preest to sing and pray for my soule in the said chirch of Abbechirch at awter of Saint John there x yer. the saide preest dayly to say his masse if he be thereto disposed ther betwixt vij or viij at the cloke afore none and to be at al ?d.... ?gunce and salue daily to be saide in the said chirch like as judge other preestes of the same chirch nowe ?.../. Residue to Eleyn my wife and I ordeeyne her miyn executrice principall and Thomas Fermory citezein and ?Scrynend of London coexectutor. ?T.../ at London.
   Prob. Lamehith 25 July 1467 and con. to Elene relict. Res. ptat.

See 1437 Langwyth property Foot of Fine and possible connection with Woolseys Farm?

1466 – Stephen Fabian (Fabyan) (of Kent House?) is listed as a representative of the City of London in Parliament during Edward IV. And other references may apply regarding Fabian a draper e.g.
18 July, 9 Edward IV. [A.D. 1469], ordinance by the Mayor and Aldermen that Stephen Fabyan should be committed to Neugate for refusing to undertake the office of Alderman of the Ward of Bisshopesgate, (fn. 4) there to remain until he either undertakes the office or pays £100 to the use of the Commonalty for his contempt. (fn. 5).  Fabyan was an alderman in 1468 and …
30 July, (fn. 12) 8 Edward IV. [A.D. 1468], Stephen Fabyan, draper, presented by the inhabitants of Bridge Ward, together with others [not named], (fn. 13) according to custom, in order that one of them might be elected Alderman of that Ward, and thereupon the said Stephen was so elected by Thomas Oulegreve, the Mayor, Richard Lee, Ralph Josselyn, Thomas Urssewyk the Recorder, William Taillour, George Irland, Robert Basset, John Stoktone, William Hamptone, John Tate, William Costantyn, Bartholomew James, William Edwarde, John Bromer, and John Warde, Aldermen; and because the said Stephen refused to undertake the burden and to take the oath, he was committed by the said Mayor and Aldermen to Newgate until favour should be shown him.

Afterwards, viz., on the 31st July, the said Stephen was released, inasmuch as it was found on examination by the said Mayor and Aldermen that he had not sufficient estate to maintain the dignity of the office of Mayor and Sheriff.

Fabyan was elected on more than one occasion as alderman but discharged for the above reason? (sources; BHO)

 

1467 – 12 and 20 January; Langley?; Stephen and John Fabian took a mortgage on land in Beckenham formerly belonging to Ralph Langley (G.W.Tookey notes from Kent  Archive).

1467 – West Wickham Manor; recorded because Scrope is mentioned elsewhere and West Wickham Manor includes some Beckenham property. Squerry is transferring to Scrope etc here. See 1468 where the Scropes acquire the Manor.

CP 25/1/117/333, number 87.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

The day after All Souls, 7 Edward IV [3 November 1467].

Parties:

Richard Scrop'Isabel Galyon'Hugh FenneHumphrey ForsterAmbrose Cresacre and Roger Copley, querents, and John Squery, deforciant.

Property:

The manors of WestwykhamBastan'Kestan' and Southcourt.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

John has acknowledged the manors to be the right of Ambrose, as those which Ambrose, Richard, Isabel, Hugh, Humphrey and Roger have of his gift, and has remised and quitclaimed them from himself and his heirs to Richard, Isabel, Hugh, Humphrey, Ambrose and Roger and the heirs of Ambrose for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

Richard, Isabel, Hugh, Humphrey, Ambrose and Roger have given him 300 pounds (marks?) sterling.


Persons:

Richard Scrope, Isabel Gallion, Hugh Fenn, Humphrey Forster, Ambrose Cresacre, Roger Copley, John Squiry

Places:

West Wickham, Baston (in Hayes), Keston, Southcourt (in Keston)

 

1468 – Various property: The Manor of West Wickham with outlying properties; Beckenham, West Wickham, Lewisham; The Manor of West Wickham is transferred from Trevillian to Scrope, eventually becomes the property of the Lennard family and the Lennards involvement in Beckenham is perpetuated in Lennard Road.

John Trevillian esquire, to Richard Scrope esquire. Sale for 300 marks beforehand paid, of his manors of Westwykham, Bastan and Southcourt co. Kent and of all lands, rents and services in Westwykham, Heese, Farnbergh, Bromley, Bekenham, Codham and Leuesham which the vendor purchased of John Squery now deceased, and request to all who are therein enfeoffed or seised to the vendor's use that they shall, when required, make a lawful estate thereof in fee simple to the said Richard or his nominees, their heirs or assigns. Dated 14 May, 8 Edward IV.

John Trevillyan esquire to Stephen Scrope, Richard Scrope esquires, Ambrose Cresacre and Roger Copley, their heirs and assigns. Quitclaim of the manors of Westwykham, Bastan and Southcourt co. Kent, and of all lands, rents and services in Westwykham, Heese, Farnbergh, Bromley, Bekenham, Codam and Leuesham: and warranty thereof against George abbot of Westminster and his successors. Dated 15 May, 8 Edward IV.

The same, to the same (as above). Charter of his manors of Westwykham, Bastan and Southcourt and of all lands, rents and services therein and in Heese, Farnbergh, Bromley, Bekenham, Codam and Leuesham co. Kent with warranty (as above) and appointment of Thomas Tregarthyn, William Tyas and Stephen Dokyll as his attorneys etc. to give them seisin thereof. Dated 14 May, 8 Edward IV.

Memorandum of acknowledgment of the foregoing charter and writings at Taunton, 27 May, before the prior of Taunton by virtue of a writ of dedimus potestatem which is upon the chancery file for this year.

1468 - Hilary Term (court of common pleas?); 

waste Kent Tyrell, Thomas, esq; Barnes, John, esq Causton, Thomas, of Bekynham

Thomas Tyrell was husband to Elizabeth Bruin and  held half of the manor of Beckenham til his death in 1473 when her  second husband took possession. Causton as a local husbandman (farmer) may have encroached on waste land (common or similar) belonging to the manor?

1469 - Court of Common Pleas, to be identified but possibly Frith Wood (seen next entry for Cresacre and Atlygh), John Atte Lygh possibly of the Leighs of Addington adjacent to West Wickham

CP 25/1/117/334, number 110.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One week from St John the Baptist, 9 Edward IV [1 July 1469].

Parties:

Ambrose Cresacre, Roger Copley and John Atte Lygh', querents, and James Crovmere, esquire, and Katherine, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

140 acres of wood in Westwykham and Bekynham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

James and Katherine have acknowledged the wood to be the right of Ambrose, as that which Ambrose, Roger and John have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed it from themselves and the heirs of Katherine to Ambrose, Roger and John and the heirs of Ambrose for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty against George, abbot of Westminster, and his successors.

For this:

Ambrose, Roger and John have given them 100 marks of silver.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

Ambrose Cresacre, Roger Copley, John Atte Leigh, James Cromer, Katherine Cromer

Places:

West Wickham, Beckenham

1469 – Pickhurst Green, Beckenham/West Wickham - Fryth wood. (as above) James Crowner esquire, son and heir of William Crowner, to Stephen Scroop, Ambrose Cresacre, Roger Copley and John Atlygh, their heirs and assigns. Demise of a wood and close called 'le Fryth' lying in West Wykham and Bekenham co. Kent in perpetuity at the accustomed services, with warranty against George abbot of St. Peter's Westminster and his successors: and appointment of John Hever and Richard Aleyn as his attorneys etc. to that intent. Witnesses: Stephen Fabian, John Kechyll, Richard Shot. Dated 3 March, 8 Edward IV.The same, to the same. Quitclaim of all rights in the wood and close called 'le Fryth' in West Wykham and Bekenham etc. (as above). Dated 12 March, 9 Edward IV.

(Calendar of Close Rolls, BHO) see 1466 Pickhurst Green.

Le Fryth or Frith Wood so far not identified although attributed by some to be part of Langley. Atligh or At Lygh is the Leigh family of Addington. The name Fabian occurs elsewhere as owner/occupant of Kent House, see 1501. This entry associates Fabian/Fabyan with Beckenham at an early date. A Fryth is a general description of a wood and the name occurs regularly elsewhere.

1469 - The Forsters were of Southend, Lewisham until the 20th Century, it is tempting to believe this may be related to Southend. (Court of Common Pleas)

CP 25/1/117/334, number 109.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One week from Holy Trinity, 9 Edward IV [4 June 1469].

Parties:

John Forster and Philip Agmondesham, querents, and Richard Forster and Isabel, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

4 messuages, 3 carucates of land, 30 acres of meadow, 300 acres of wood and 40 shillings of rent and a rent of 2 ounces of pepper, 2 hens and 3 chickens in Leuesham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Richard and Isabel have acknowledged the tenements and rents to be the right of John, as those which John and Philip have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Isabel to John and Philip and the heirs of John for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty against Walter, abbot of the monastery of St Augustine, Bristol, and his successors.

For this:

John and Philip have given them 200 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

John Forster, Philip Amersham, Richard Forster, Isabel Forster

Places:

Lewisham

1469 – Beckenham Manor; Lease and counterpart from Thomas Tyrell, of Beckenham, Kent, and Elizabeth, his wife, one of the daughters and heirs of Henry Bruyn, knight to Robert Harleston, of Suffolk of half the manor of Beckenham, Kent [One seal on each] (Bromley Collections)

 

Following the division of Beckenham Manor between Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn and the subsequent descent of one half via the Tyrell family and the other via Heveningham and Harleston this lease indicates that Harleston may have acquired both halves of the Manor through his marriage to Alice and lease of Elizabeth’s half from her husband Tyrell only to die shortly thereafter. 

 

1471 – The Black Death; An outbreak in this year is thought to have killed 10 to 15 percent of the population. Borrowman records an entry in the will of William Dawe a bequest that if his son Richard die of this sickness that now vexeth. Since its first appearance the plaque periodically emerged with varying severity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Death_in_England

1471 – Death of Robert Harleston, husband of Alice Bruyn, the descent of her half of Beckenham Manor will go via his son Clement Harleston. Harleston had also leased the other moiety from Thomas Tyrell and Elizabeth Bruyn. Possession of the Manor of Beckenham does not imply occupation as several tenants probably occupy the manor.

 

1471 – Langley; John Warkworth, the chronicler in the reign of Edward IV mentions among other “woe waters” a pool at Langley Park, the drying up of which presaged the Battle of Barnet in 1471. He Says “also ther is a pytte in Kent, in Langley Park: ayens any batayle he “will be dry, and it rayne never so mych; and if ther be no batayle towarde he will be full of watere, but it nevyre so dry a wthyre and this yere he is dry” (source; R.Borrowman 1910)

1471 – Sympson’s Place, Bromley and Beckenham. Sympson’s straddles the Bromley Beckenham border either side of the River Ravensbourne. The Will of Robert Simpson citizen & draper of London will 1471

ROBERT SYMPSON, citizen and draper of London 7 August 1471. To be buried in the church of Sent Benett Fynk wher
I am parisshen, on the south side of the high auter willing that once my burying place ther be made a Tombe of marble and ouer that a comely presbitery of stonewerk and also that the South Chapell ther and South Ile be garynshed, made and amended by the advice of myn executours. [Directs a perpetual chantry at the altar in the south chapell and leaves bequests to the churches of Wysebic Elme and Walsokyn].
To the church of Bromle [Bromley] in Kent 20 marc to have my soule ther praied for.
Johane my wife. To Maister John Recerby my bible &e &e.
Last will: Land and Mille at Stratford, tenement and wharf called Venours Wharf in London, tenement called the Swan in parish of Saint Dionise Bakchurch.
All my rent, londes and tenements in Merden [Marden], and Bochon Mounchesey [Boughton Monchelsea] in Kent to be sold for an obit. The said manor lands and tenements at Bromley. The nownage of Robert my sonne. [no other Kent connection].
Proved 6 November 1471. (P.C.C. 3 Wattys). (Source Kentarchaeology)

Horsburgh states that the son Robert sold SympsonsFrom Close Roll, No. 289, we learn that Mercy Carew and her trustees sold the property to John Stanlove (or Stanlowe), and Margaret his wife, and from Margaret’s trustees, after the death of her husband, the property was bought by Robert Simpson. An inquisition on the holdings of Robert Simpson, in 1471, is conclusive as to the identity of the estate held by him and that held by Mercy Carew, and transmitted to him through Margaret Stanlove.

The inquisition just referred to also states that Robert Simpson died on August 8th, 1471, and that his heir was Robert Simpson, his son, at that date aged two years and five months. Robert, the father, was a rich London merchant, a member of the Drapers’ Company, and a pious donor to the Church of St. Benet Fynk in the City, under the shadow of which church he himself resided in Fynk Lane. He also left twenty marks to the parish church of Bromley.

His Bromley estate was held in trust for his son Robert until he became of age, and in due course Robert succeeded his father, not only as owner of Simpson’s Place, but also as prominent citizen of London.

In 1503, however, he disposed of all his holdings in Bromley and the district to a body of trustees acting for some person unknown, but two months later a new and single owner appears in the person of John Style, mercer of London, who had already purchased Langley Park, Beckenham.

His title, however, was disputed by the aforesaid body of trustees, and a protracted lawsuit, extending for some years beyond John Style’s lifetime, ended in favour of his widow, Elizabeth, and their son Humphrey.”

A later foot of fine in 1504 transfers property to Sir Thomas Brandon and others perhaps under lease but John Style’s widow Elizabeth and her second husband James Yarford take possession of Sympson’s after John Style’s death in 1505. See entries related upto 1510. These must relate to Horsburgh’s description of a lawsuit including the writ diem clausit extremum wherein the crown took possession as it appears Sympson held the property by rent from the crown.

1472 - Harleian Manuscripts catalogue item, British Museum. Licence for Sir John Hynyngham to enter the Manor of Bekyngham. Also recorded by Hasted but with a possible misprint of “1742”. Following the practice that widows were often remarried to other suitors Alice appears to have quickly been remarried to Hynyngham/Heveningham who by this licence acquires her half of Beckenham Manor but Alice’s first marriage to Berners has no surviving heir although her second marriage to Harleston will determine the moiety of the manor descends to Clement Harleston, see the 1474 inquisition which describes the children of Alice by her respective husbands and the short timescale of these events seems to indicate she may have died in childbirth from her marriage to Heveningham or shortly thereafter. As Alice dies in 1473 and a son is born it is possible she dies in childbirth or soon after.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=PaRJAAAAcAAJ&lpg=PA283&dq=hynyngham%20bekyngham&pg=PA283#v=onepage&q=hynyngham%20bekyngham&f=false

1472 - Hayes; Reference: C 146/5019 Description: Grant by John Hever of Hese, Simon Shotte of Bromelegh, the elder, and William Cowper of Downe to Isabel Smyzthe late the wife of John Smyzthe of Downe of all those lands and tenements with all their appurtenances (sic) except a croft of land called 'Belysland' with six other parcels of land lying dispersed in a place called 'le Hilde,' and also another parcel of wood called 'Poke Grove'; to hold to her for life, with remainder to them, their heirs and assigns, for sale, the money therefrom to be disposed according to the intent of the last will of the said John Smyzthe. Downe, 14 June, 12 Edward IV. Note: Fragments of seals Date: 1472 June 14

1473 – Beckenham Manor; Death of Alice Bruyn on 15th February (married to 3rd husband John Heveningham.) see 1474 inquisition.

The items for 1469 and 1472 related to the descent of Beckenham Manor through the marriages of the Brun sister Alice and Elizabeth. Alice married Berners, Harleston, Heveningham(Hyningham) and Elizabeth married Tyrell, Brandon, Mallory. Alice’s 2nd husband Harleston seemingly leased the half belonging to Elizabeth and Tyrell. Harleston died in 1471 and Alice married Hyningham/Heveningham. Alice died in 1473. A complex chain of events due to the dates of deaths and absence of some direct heirs or their early deaths without issue.

1473 - see 1466, this is related to John Hever. C. 5019. Grant by John Hever of Hese, Simon Shotte of Bromelegh, the elder, and William Cowper of Downe to Isabel Smyzthe late the wife of John Smyzthe of Downe of all those lands and tenements with all their appurtenances (sic) except a croft of land called 'Belysland' with six other parcels of land lying dispersed in a place called 'le Hilde,' and also another parcel of wood called 'Poke Grove'; to hold to her for life, with remainder to them, their heirs and assigns, for sale, the money therefrom to be disposed according to the intent of the last will of the said John Smyzthe. Downe, 14 June, 12 Edward IV. Fragments of seals.

1474 (see also 1461) - Beckenham Manor, relevant to the division between Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn and their heirs. A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 18 March, 13 Edw. IV.(1474) (Inq. 13 Edw. IV. No. 59), directed to John Brode, escheator of Kent, upon the death of Alice, wife of John Hevenyngham, knt. (4.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromlegh, co. Kent, 11 Nov, 13 Edw. IV., before John Brode, the elder, the escheator, by the oaths of John Kyere, Thomas Kyng, Simon Keehill, Henry Violet, Alexander Curteys, Stephen Kete, John Plegge, Robert Humfrey, Philip Alexander, Robert Pope, John Dare Taillour, William Bradfote, and Richard Kyng, setting forth that Alice Hevenyngham was seized of the moiety of the manor of Beghenham, and the moiety of the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one fourth part of a knights fee, and married successively John Berners, esq. (by whom she had issue John Berners), Robert Harleston esq. (by whom she had likewise issue), and John Hevenyngham,knt. (by whom she had issue George Hevenyngham),and that she died 15 Feb., 12 Edw. IV.;(1473) and that the said John Hevenyngham now holds the premises; and that the before-mentioned John Berners is her son and next heir, and is of the age of 10 years. Pat. p. 3. m. 5 (23).

1475 – Kelseys; The Brograves are no strangers to legal process being both plaintiffs and defendants in several cases. There are properties called Great Groveland Mead and Little Groveland Mead on the east side of Elmers End Green shown on the 1736 Burrell/Kelsey estate map. The implication is that Thomas Horne is leasing or has use of the land from William Brograve. Feoffee “was a trustee who holds a fief (or "fee"), that is to say an estate in land, for the use of a beneficial owner.”

Source;

Short title: Brograve v Horne.1475-1480, or 1483-1485

Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Early Pleadings and Proceedings, Chancery pleadings addressed to the Bishop of Lincoln as... Short title: Brograve v Horne. Plaintiffs: William Brograve, citizen and draper of London. Defendants: Thomas Horne, feoffee to complainant's use. Subject: Land called `Grovelond' in Beckenham. Kent.

This is the earliest archive reference we have in which ‘Brograve’ is mentioned in relation to possessing Beckenham property, the full extent of it at this time is unknown but see 1487 where William Brograve and a fellow London draper acquire more Beckenham land and other property presumably extending his holding. See 1384 for mention of the Manor of Grovelond.

 1475 - Hilary Term; Ellen, wife of John Langwyth tailor of London

trespass and contempt Kent Langwyth, Ellen Abbat, John, of Bokenham, husbandman
trespass: close Kent Langwyth, Ellen Abot, John, of Bekenham, husbandman
trespass: close Kent Wye, Thomas Pope, Robert, of Bekenham, yeoman

Pope may bear further investigation as there  are some burials recorded later and Robert Pope gave evidence on oath with others regarding the inspeximus of Henry Bruyn.

1475 etc. – TNA ref. C 1/64/566 Dates 1475-1480, or 1483-1485 Short title: Tyrell v The Mayor of London.

Plaintiffs: Elizabeth Tyrell, widow, late the wife of Thomas Tyrell, of Beckenham, esquire.

Defendants: The mayor and sheriffs of London.

Subject: Arrest on actions brought by William Brytell, of London, grocer, an executor of the said Tyrell, against her as his administratrix, which she refused to be. Corpus cum causa. Kent, London.

SFP

 

1478 - Post Mortem Inquisition: Walter Fitz dies possessed of parts of Foxgrove Manor and Beckenham Manor, but seemingly under some 'lease at will' arrangement for rent from Terell/Tyrell and Grene? Writ 29 November, inquisition 2 February, 21 Henry VII. (source: BHO and Calendar of PMIs)

Roger Fitz was seised in fee of the under-mentioned lands &c. in Leuesham and Bekenham, and by his charter indented dated at Leuesham, 20 March, 19 Henry VII, gave them to Peter Bevyll, Roger Holand, William Honychurch, Thomas Ifley, George Harvy, Robert Morley and William Morley, who survive, and the said Walter Fitz, since deceased, and their heirs, to the use of Isabel, his wife, now wife of William Atclyff, for life, and after her death to the use of himself and his heirs. Afterwards, to wit, on 28 March, 19 Henry VII, the said Roger by his last will willed that after the death of Isabel the said Peter Bevyll and the others should stand enfeoffed of the said lands &c. to the use of the said Walter, his brother, and the heirs male of his body, and in default of such heirs male to the use of himself, the said Roger and his heirs.
Walter died 3 June last, seised of the other under-mentioned lands &c. in fee tail, to wit, to himself and the heirs of his body. John Fitz, aged 9 years and more, is his son and sole next heir.

Manor of Rydley, and 100a. land, 20a. wood and 40s. rent in Rydley and Asshe, worth 5l., held of the abbot of the monastery of St. Mary of Graces beside the Tower of London, in right of his church, by service of half a knight’s fee and 33s. 4d. rent yearly.
A messuage and 100a. land in Perystrete in the parish of Northflete, worth 100s., and a messuage, 11a. land and 2a. moor in Bowrestrete in the same parish, worth 14s., held in ‘gavelkend’ of the archbishop of Canterbury by fealty and 33s. 4d. rent.
A messuage, 40a. land, 6a. meadow and 6a. wood in Estgrenewiche, worth 40s., held of the prior of the house of Jesus of Shene, co. Surrey, by fealty and other services or rents unknown.
12 messuages, 200a. pasture, 300a. meadow and 400a. wood in Leuesham and Bekenham, worth 40 marks, held as to the messuages &c. in Leuesham of the said prior of Shene and Thomas, marquess of Dorset, by fealty and 8s. rent, and as to the messuages &c. in Bekenham of William Terell, as of his manor of Bekenham, and Thomas Grene, knight, as of his manor of Foxgroves in Bekenham, by 7s. rent.

It is questionable whether the land in Beckenham held of Terell (Tyrell) and Grene is all of Tyrell’s moietie of Beckenham Manor and all of Grene’s Foxgrove but the rents of the lands in Lewisham and Beckenham being similar would have us believe that about half of the 900 acres is in Beckenham. The Tyrell moietie of Beckenham Manor is about 468 acres and Tyrell had acquired his part of Beckenham Manor through the marriage of Elizabeth Bruyn and Thomas Tyrell circa 1468 and Thomas died in 1471. Elizabeth is married to William Brandon at this time. The son William Tyrell is only aged about 10 at this time inferring that Elizabeth and Brandon are acting as mother and stepfather.

1479circa – but see 1475 Court of Chancery case reference; William Brograve of Kelseys in possession of lands around Kelsey in Beckenham.

1480 - Court of Common Pleas;  Colet as plaintif, Brandon had married Elizabeth, daughter of  Sir Henry Brun and heiress to half of Beckenham Manor. There's no known occupancy of Beckenham Manor by Brandon but they were cerainly landlords.

Hilary 1480

d

1720

Kent

Colet, Henry, of London, mercer

Brandon, William, of Bekenham, esq; Elizabeth his wife

 

1481 - Court of Common Pleas Foot of Fine, land and people to be identified but on the Bromley/Beckenham border

CP 25/1/117/340, number 266.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One month from Easter, 21 Edward IV [20 May 1481].

Parties:

Robert Shotte, querent, and Thomas Whyte and Agnes, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 28 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow and 8 acres of wood in Bromlegh' and Bekenham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Thomas and Agnes have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Robert, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Agnes to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

Robert has given them 20 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

Robert Shott, Thomas White, Agnes White

Places:

Bromley, Beckenham

 

1483 - King Richard III until 1485

Richard had seized the throne and is suspected of murdering the Princes in the Tower.  The feeling that he was not entitled to the crown led to conflict between him and the supporters of Henry Tudor. This turmoil affected local affairs as the owners of estates either fell foul or gained favour with Richard and subsequently Henry VII after the Battle of Bosworth where Richard was killed after he had killed William Brandon, Henry Tudor's standard bearer, who was second husband of Elizabeth Bruyn, heiress to one half of Beckenham Manor. William Brandon had been attained for treason by Richard as a rebel and his lands were forfeit. As he had siezed them by being Elizabeth Bruyn's second husband they were returned to Tyrell. Brandon had also siezed Elizebeth's sister Alice's moieties of property probably on the basis that Elizabeth was the surviving sister. Alice's moieties were returned to her husband John Heveningham.

1483 – Beckenham Manor Patent Rolls attributed to 1 Richard II (1483) drawing on earlier deeds and probably instrumental in the settling of Bruyn estates upon rightful heirs. It  recites earlier  documents ie Fines and Deeds.  1484  follows on from the  same Rolls

 

 

https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/Report_1840_1908/qDxKAQAAMAAJ?q=henyngham&gbpv=1#f=false

1484 - Beckenham Manor; Patent Rolls II Richard III May 27th; (2nd year of Richard's reign)

Restitution to John Henyngham (Heveningham), knt, of his estate as tenant for life in the moiety of the undermentioned manor (though relevant to Southwokynton the same applies to Beckenham having been also a moiety belonging to Alice (Bruyn) and Henyngham (Heveningham). Note the 'unjustly expelled' comment. To this day people take sides with either Edward IV, Richard III or Henry Tudor (VII).  So the story may be biased one way or the other. William Brandon was standard bearer to Henry Tudor and killed by Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. Heveningham’s heir George did not inherit as the moietie reverted to the heir of Alice’s first husband Berners but his heir apparently died and the heir of Harleston, her second husband, inherited.

Upon Alice's death the 2nd husband of her sister Elizabeth, William Brandon, seized the half belonging to Alice's widower, Heveningham/Henyngham. The report says that all property was repossessed by the crown and some restitution was made returning property to Heveningham. Complex in that the estates ranged from Essex, Kent, Hampshire etc. Also, Brandon had been attained for treason by Richard III as Brandon was a supporter of Henry Tudor who would become Henry VII after the Battle of Bosworth shortly afterwards. Subsequent hearings under Henry VII it would seem took back half of the Manor of Beckenham from Heveningham to Elizabeth's son and heir by Tyrell, her first husband.

This link contains details regarding the dealings between the husbands of Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn over their inherited estates. https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=qDxKAQAAMAAJ&lpg=RA8-PA128&dq=%22thomas%20tyrell%22%20bruyn&pg=RA8-PA132#v=snippet&q=henyngham&f=false


May 27. Whereas by an act in Parliament at Westminster, 28 January,

624 CALENDAR OF PATENT ROLL  Membrane 22 — cant.

Westminster. 1 Richard III, it was ordained that William Brandon, esquire, should forfeit all the possessions which he held on 18 October then last past, and by an inquisition taken at Brendewode, co. Essex, on 8 September, 2 Richard III, before Thomas Lynam, then escheator, by virtue of his office, it was found that Philippa, late duchess of York and lady of the Isle of Wight, was seised of the manor of South Wokyngton, co. Essex, with the advowson of the church of South wokyngton, and two acres of land in Stifford, CO. Essex, with the advowson of the church of that town pertaining thereto in her demesne as of fee and granted the same to Maurice Bruyn, knight, and Elizabeth his wife and the heirs of their bodies with remainder to the right heirs of Maurice, and the said Maurice and Elizabeth were accordingly seised of the premises in their demesne as of fee tail and on their death the premises descended to Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn as their kinswomen and heirs, viz. daughters and heirs of Henry Bruyn their son and heir, and these accordingly entered into the premises and were seised of the same in their demesne as of fee tail and Alice married John Henyngham, knight, and Elizabeth married the said William Brandon, and the said John and Alice had issue George and afterwards Alice died, and after her death the said John as tenant by the law of England and the said William and Elizabeth were seised of the premises until the said William expelled and unjustly disseised the said John and on 28 October, 1 Richard III, was seised of one part of the premises in his demesne as of fee and of the other part in the right of the said Elizabeth his wife, and accordingly the premises were taken into the king's hands and are still in his hands ; the king hereby restores to the said John Henyngham his moiety of the premises and grants the other moiety to him and his assigns for the life of the said William Brandon to the use of Edmund Shaa, knight, Thomas Tyrell, esquire of the body, Richard Fitslowes and Humphrey Tyrell, esquire, by fealty, and grants to him the issues of the manor and two acres from Easter last during the life of the said William. By p.s.

1483 - Harleian Manuscripts catalogue item1472, British Museum. Licence for Sir John Hynyngham to enter the Manor of Bekyngham

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=PaRJAAAAcAAJ&lpg=PA283&dq=hynyngham%20bekyngham&pg=PA283#v=onepage&q=hynyngham%20bekyngham&f=false

1484 - Beckenham Manor Close Rolls; II Richard III  

1484 – Foxgrove is mentioned in Records of the Exchequer at the National Archive, Kew. Parties: Richard Middelton, Esq., Lady Maud Grene his wife, and Thomas Grene (b.1461), Esq & Margaret Kyng, widow, farmer of the manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham; Place or Subject: The manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham (Bekenham), [Receipt]. County: Kent

The Grenes(Green/Greene) have some importance in the early history of Foxgrove as one member of the family appears in legal documents as escheator or sheriff. Tracing their family tree is somewhat easier as they are related to the family of Vaux/Vaus and also to Parr (ie distantly to Catherine Parr). Some success can be got by searching the internet and Wikipedia. Sir Thomas Grene is apparently connected with properties in Northampton. One Thomas Green was attained for treason and though found innocent he died in the Tower of London. Lady Maud Grene mentioned here is the widow of Sir Thomas Grene who died in 1462. The name of King/Kinge and Kynge are recorded in Beckenham burials from the earliest records circa 1539 to the 18th Century. One Henry King is recorded as transporting timber for dockyards. Their term of occupancy of Foxgrove Farm cannot be determined with any accuracy. Also, see 1450 for ‘King’ family members mentioned in pardons related to Cade’s rebellion.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=jBBJAAAAcAAJ&lpg=PA337&dq=dymmok%20kyngson&pg=PA337#v=onepage&q=grene&f=false

The above link for Ancient Charters and Instruments describes Thomas Grene, son of Sir Thomas Grene arranging rents from Foxgrove Manor to Thomas Kyngson and Andrew Dymmok for their services in recovering other property in the Manor of Berghershe and appurtenences in Plumstead. 

1484 - Foxgrove: Parties: Richard Middelton, Esq., Lady Maud Grene his wife, and Thomas Grene, Esq (her son) & Margaret Kyng, widow, farmer of the manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham; Place or Subject: The manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham (Bekenham), [Receipt]. County: Kent 2 Ric III (TNA Ref. E 326/6791)

And: Grantor: Thomas, son and heir of Thomas Grene, knight, Margaret Kyng, and Richard her son; Grantee: Thomas, Kyngson and Andrew Dymmok; Place or Subject: Grant of a rent charged on the manor of Foxgrove in the parish of Beckenham; County: Kent 2 Ric III Ref. E 327/595 (TNA)

From E 326 - Exchequer: Augmentation Office: Ancient Deeds, Series B (TNA) The description of the grant of rents can be found in the above link.

Extract below, from Formulare Anglicanum: Or, a Collection of Ancient Charters and Instruments of Divers Kinds, Taken from the Originals ... and Deduced from the Norman Conguest, to the End of the Reign of King Henry the VIII. This being from the 2nd year of Richard III.

1485 - Beckenham Manor; Close Rolls of Richard III

1485 - Battle of Bosworth, William Brandon is killed by Richard III. Brandon is standard bearer to Henry Tudor and second husband of Elizabeth Bruyn, heiress of half of Beckenham Manor although her half was now in possession of the heirs of her first husband Thomas Tirrell (see 1483). The battle's outcome was the death of Richard III and the end of the Wars of the Roses. Henry Tudor became Henry VII.

1485 - King Henry VII until 1509

 1485 – Beckenham Manor; this describes the treason by William Brandon against Richard III, the seizure of Beckenham Manor by Brandon upon the death of Alice Bruyn and the seizure by the crown upon Brandon’s inquisition, then the restitution of the property to Heveningham ‘for life’.

 “Restitution to John Henyngham of moiety of the manor and advowson of Bekenham (Kent); also further grant to him of the other moiety thereof to hold during the life of William Brandon, to the use of Edmund Shaa, knt. Thomas Tirell, esquire of the royal body, Richard Fitzlowes, and Humfrey Tirell, esqurs., by fealty.

The grant notices the attainder of the said William Brandon for high treason, also the inquisition taken thereupon at Depford Stronde (Kent), 10 May, 2 Richard III, before John Kendale the escheator, whereby it was found that Philippa late duchess of York and lady of the Isle of Wight, being seized of the said manor and advowson of Bekenham, conveyed them to Maurice Bruyn, knt. And Elizabeth his wife, in tail general; on their death, the manor and advowson descended to teir grand-daughters Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn: Alice married the said John Henyngham, and died, leaving issue George; Elizabeth married the said William Brandon; and on the death of the said Alice, they expelled the said John Henyngham from his purparty (as tenant for life) of the property. By virtue of the said attainder and inquisition, the said property escheated to the crown.”

https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/Report_1840_1908/qDxKAQAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=inspeximus+Alice+Bruyn&pg=RA8-PA145&printsec=frontcover

1485 - Hayes; TNA Reference: C 146/740 Description: Letters of attorney from John Aleyn, of Codam, Kent, William Cawystyn, of Westwykham in the same county, Thomas Shot, of Hese (Hayes), Kent, and Richard Asshelegh, of Cudham aforesaid, husbandmen, to Thomas Notson, citizen and draper of London, authorising him to deliver seisin to Katherine Hayman, daughter of Richard Hayman, citizen and barber of London, and Alice his wife, daughter and heiress of John Hever, deceased, of lands, etc, in the said parish of Hayes, which formerly belonged to the said John Hever: Kent Dated: 24 November, 1 Henry VII Note: Seal Date: [1485-1486]

1486 – Beckenham Manor; 19th June, This charter lists documents and events surrounding the descent of the Manor of Beckenham down the Bruyn line, through the two sisters, Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn and their respective husbands and heirs.

Transcription :
Inspeximus and exemplification, at the instance of Elizabeth Brandon, widow, of the following documents:—(l.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 15 Feb.,1 Edw. IV. (Inq. 1 Edw. IV. No. 27), directed to John Grene, escheator of Kent, upon the death of Henry Bruyn, Knt. (2.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromley, co. Kent, on Saturday, 20 Feb, 1 Edw. IV.,before John Grene, the escheator, by the oaths of Richard Nether, Thomas Dawe, John Mydday, Wlliam Myddey, John Plegge, John Yorke, Henry Lapworth,Thomas Bedyll, Henry Violet, Robert Blundell, Simon Kechill, and Robert Thorp, setting forth that Henry Bruyn, knt., was seized of the manor of Beckenham, alias Beghenham (fully described), with the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one knights fee; and that he died 30 Nov. last; and that Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Tyrell, esq.,aged 17 years, and Alice, wife of John Berners, aged 19 years, are his daughters and heirs. (3.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 18 March, 13 Edw. IV.(1474) (Inq. 13 Edw. IV. No. 59), directed to John Brode, escheator of Kent, upon the death of Alice, wife of John Hevenyngham, knt. (4.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromlegh, co. Kent, 11 Nov, 13 Edw. IV., before John Brode, the elder, the escheator, by the oaths of John Kyere, Thomas Kyng, Simon Keehill, Henry Violet, Alexander Curteys, Stephen Kete, John Plegge, Robert Humfrey, Philip Alexander, Robert Pope, John Dare Taillour, William Bradfote, and Richard Kyng, setting forth that Alice Hevenyngham was seized of the moiety of the manor of Beghenham, and the moiety of the adrowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one fourth part of a knights fee, and married successively John Berners, esq. (by whom she had issue John Berners), Robert Harleston esq. (by whom she had likewise issue), and John Hevenynghanl,knt. (by whom she had issue George Hevenyngham),and that she died 15 Feb., 12 Edw. IV.;(1473) and that the said John Hevenyngham now holds the premises; and that the before-mentioned John Berners is her son and next heir, and is of the age of 10 years. Pat. p. 3. m. 5 (23).

This explains quite fully the situation regarding Alice (Bruyn) and her son and heir John Berners. Elizabeth Bruyn who had married Brandon is seemingly endorsing her right to the other moiety of Beckenham Manor.

1487 – Kelsey or Sympson’s Place? Lewis, son of John Stanlowe esquire and Margaret his wife, to John Shukbergh and William Brograve, drapers of London, their heirs and assigns. Release and quitclaim of all those lands and tenements, rents, reversions and services, woods, meadows, lesues and pastures in the parishes of Bromlegh, Bekenham, Leuesham, Chesilhurst, Orpyngton and Hese co. Kent formerly of John and Margaret Stanlowe, which the said John Shukbergh and William held jointly with Robert draper, Thomas Ursewyk, recorder of London, William Alyngton, John Hungerford and William Poury deceased, by gift of John Bromlegh, abbot of Bermondesey, John Catesby serjeant at law, William Alisaundre, William Est, George Dawne chaplain and Thomas Guyne, with warranty against the abbot of Memorandum of acknowledgment, 5 December.Westminster and his successors. Dated 1 December, 5 Henry VII. (BHO, Calendar of Close Rolls)

Maybe this is not the core of Kelsey as that is thought to have been acquired from Kelshulle but showing that William Brograve perhaps added to the estate. Robert Sympson (d.1471) is of Sympson’s Place needs confirming but Sympson’s Place was connected with the Stile, Raymond and then Burrell families. See 1438 where Stanlowe is mentioned which connects back to land which passed through the possession of Nicholas Carreu of Bedington. And earlier in 1403 and 1422 references to the lands connected with Carreu and Malmaines. Before 1487 Brograve is mentioned in connection with ‘Grovelond’ see 1475. Sympson, Shukbergh, Brograve were all drapers and members of the same guild. This type of connection is common.

1487 – Will of Richard Dawe. The Dawe name is in the list of pardons from Cade’s rebellion and the connection to Batt and Kinge  is interesting. Lands and tenements establish Dawe as another yeoman of the area and a close neighbour of Batt.

SW/1_255
RICHARD DAWE of Penge.
20 Jan., 1487[-8]. To be buried in the churchyard of St. George, Becnam. To the high altar of Batyrsey where [I was] parishioner [vbi Parochianus] for tithes forgot 6d. To the high altar of Becnam 6d. To the church of Becnam a torch. Residue to Joan my wife, Executrix, for the welfare of my soul. John Moger and John Allen, Overseers. {Latin.]
Witn. John Batte, Edward Kyng, John Kyng and many others.
`Hec est ultima voluntas' of me Richard Dawe of Penge, Joan Daw my wife to have all my lands and tenements, in the parish of Becnam and in the parish of Heys, Kent, for 20 years. After which they are to remain to the heirs of our bodies. If said Joan dies without heirs of our bodies then they are to remain to Richard Daw son and heir of Richard Daw of Wotcroft.
Proved 18 March, 1487[-8].[DW/PA/7/1 f.78].

1487 - Court of Common Pleas;  

Michaelmas 1487

d 409

Kent

Strelley, Nicholas, knight

Tochet, Roger, of Bekenham, clerk

trespass

1492 - Foot of Fine; Lewisham and Sydenham. recorded in case it connects with perhaps Kent House or Penge

CP 25/1/117A/345, number 131.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

Link:

Image of dorse of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Two weeks from St John the Baptist, 7 Henry VII [8 July 1492]. And afterwards one week from St Michael, 8 Henry VII [6 October 1492].

Parties:

William Sutton', clerk, Richard Wytton', clerk, Thomas Kysyng', citizen and mercer of London', and Richard Walker, citizen and grocer of London', querents, and John Norbury, knight, and Joan, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 120 acres of land, 16 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture and 68 acres of wood in Leuesham and Sippenham in the parish of Leuesham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

John and Joan have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Richard Walker, as those which the same Richard, William, Richard Wytton' and Thomas have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of John* to William, Richard, Thomas and Richard and the heirs of Richard Walker for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty by John and Joan for themselves and the heirs of Joan.

For this:

William, Richard, Thomas and Richard have given them 200 pounds sterling.

Note:

[* This name has been altered.]


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

William Sutton, Richard Witton, Thomas Kising, Richard Walker, John Norbury, Joan Norbury

Places:

London, Lewisham, Sydenham (in Lewisham)


1493 - Court of Common Pleas, names and land to be identified. 84 acres is a considerable size. We have several mysteries particularly with the Elmers End area of the district.

CP 25/1/117A/346, number 152.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Two weeks from St Martin, 9 Henry VII [25 November 1493].

Parties:

Roger Shelley, Thomas Polsted', William Arnold', John Reydon', Thomas Shirley, John Petteley and Thomas Shot, querents, and William Thornton' and Margaret, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 75 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow and 1 acre of wood in Bekenham'.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

William Thornton' and Margaret have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Roger, as those which Roger, Thomas, William Arnold', John, Thomas, John and Thomas have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Margaret to Roger, Thomas, William Arnold', John, Thomas, John and Thomas and the heirs of Roger for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty against John, abbot of St Peter, Westminster, and his successors.

For this:

Roger, Thomas, William Arnold', John, Thomas, John and Thomas have given them 40 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

Roger Shelley, Thomas Polstead, William Arnold, John Reydon, Thomas Shirley, John Petley, Thomas Shott, William Thornton, Margaret Thornton

Places:

Beckenham

1493 – Kelsey; The lives of the Brograves of Kelsey defy much investigation and several references cannot be tied down to the Beckenham Brograves but William Brograve, draper was also an alderman of the City of London as were so many Beckenham residents. This connection to Dormer of West Wickham is interesting although we have no idea what the case involved.

TNA ref C 1/187/16 Short title: Brograve v Dormer.

Plaintiffs: William Brograve, of London, draper.

Defendants: William Dormer, of West Wykam, woolman.

Subject: Transaction in wool. Buckinghamshire Mutilated and partly illegible. 1493-1500

1493 - Short title: Style v Wolston. Plaintiffs: John Style and Elizabeth, his wife, daughter of Sir Guy Wolston, knight, and of Margaret, late his wife. Defendants: Sir Guy Wolston, knight, and Margaret, his second wife, and Robert Wyttelbury.

Subject: The manors of Hale, Apethorpe, Yarewell, Castur, and Tansoure, with other messuages and lands. Northamptonshire Date; 1493-1500

Supporting evidence for Style marriage to Elizabeth Wolston, and perhaps some dispute over Wolston’s late wife’s will?

 

1493 – Penge; Surrey Wills ref; SW/2_135
Michael Athethe of Penge, Battersea 12 Mar 1493/4 (to be buried in the churchyard of Beckenham, Kent; to high altar 6d; to the light of St 'Concs' ..)
residue to my wife Juliana Athethe, exec.
Proved: [no act given] [DW/PA/7/2 f.42v]

This is an example of the residents of Penge using Beckenham Church as their nearest place of worship.

1494 - ELIZABETH BRANDON, Post Mortem Inquisition, widow. Writ 7 March, inq. 20 June, 9 Hen. VII. Elizabeth Bruyn, late the wife of Maurice Bruyn, knt., was seised of the under-mentioned manors and lands in fee tail and had issue by the said Maurice, whom she survived, a son and heir, Henry Bruyn, knt., who died in his mother’s lifetime, leaving issue two daughters and heirs, the elder Alice, and the younger the said Elizabeth, named in the writ. The said Alice married one Robert Harleston, esq., and had issue a son John Harleston, who is now living. And afterwards the said Robert Harleston died. And the said Elizabeth, sister of Alice, married one Thomas Tyryell, esq., and had issue a son Hugh Tyryell, who is now living. And afterwards the said Elizabeth Bruyn, widow, died, and the said manors, &c., descended to the said Alice, and to the said Thomas, and Elizabeth his wife, in her right. And afterwards the said Alice married one John Hevenyngham, knt., and had issue a son George Hevenyngham, and died; and the said John Hevenyngham, knt., who survived her, is seised of her moiety of the premises, as tenant by the curtesy. And the said Thomas Tyryell died, and the said Elizabeth survived him, and took to husband one William Brandon, knt., whom she survived. She married thirdly one William Mallery, esq., whom also she survived. She died 26 March last. The said Hugh Tyryell, aged 23 and more, is her son and heir.
Immediately after his mother’s decease the said Hugh enfeoffed one Henry Colom, clk., of the moiety of the premises which then descended to him; and the said Henry Colom, at the request of the said Hugh, enfeoffed the said Hugh. and Margaret daughter of Gilbert Hussy, esq., William Hussy, knt., …….. Peter Hussy, clk., William Wylloughby, esq., son of Christopher Wylloughby, knt., Thomas Mongomery, Thomas Tyryell, and others, of the said moiety, to the use of the said Hugh and Margaret, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder in default to the said Hugh and his heirs for ever.

ELIZABETH BRANDON, widow.Writ 22 March, inq. the last day but one of May, 9 Hen. VII.She died 7 March, 9 Hen. VII, (1494) seised of a moiety of the under-mentioned manor in fee, and of a moiety of the under-mentioned advowson, as of fee and right.
Hugh Tyrell, aged 23 and more, is her son and heir.
A moiety of the manor and advowson of Bekyngham, worth 15l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight’s fee.

1494 - Immediately after his mother's decease (Elizabeth nee Bruyn) the said Hugh (Tyrell) enfeoffed one Henry Colom, clk., of the moiety of the premises (inc A moiety of the manor and advowson of Bekyngham, worth 15l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight's fee.

C. Series II. Vol. 9. (14.) E. Series II. File 462. (2.)) which then descended to him; and the said Henry Colom, at the request of the said Hugh, enfeoffed the said Hugh and Margaret daughter of Gilbert Hussy, esq., William Hussy, knt., .... Peter Hussy, clk., William Wylloughby, esq., son of Christopher Wylloughby, knt., Thomas Mongomery, Thomas Tyryell, and others, of the said moiety, to the use of the said Hugh and Margaret, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder in default to the said Hugh and his heirs for ever.

1494 - Foxgrove: 1494 Apr 15 Debtor: Thomas Green, of Northants., knight, Margaret King, of Foxgrove in the parish of Beckenham in Kent, widow, and Richard Clerk, of the parish of Plumstead in Kent, husbandman. Creditor: Richard Golofre, citizen and mercer [merchant] of London. Amount: £31. Before whom: John Brown, knight, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster. When taken: 08/09/1492 First term: 24/06/1493 Last term: 24/06/1493 Writ to: Sheriff of [Kent] Sent by: John Brown, knight, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster. Endorsement: London' Middx. Kanc' Coram d'no R' ...... sua in [crossed out: Oct' S'ti... p'x' futur] crastino Ascensionis d'ni p'x futur'.

TNA ref C 241/267/26

Foxgrove becomes more of a mystery for its earliest times as substantiating evidence for Philipot and Hasted's accounts is rare or cannot be found. But we have concluded that Philipot got some facts and events confused.
Philipot had related: Lord Burwash, who in the forty third year of the abovesaid Prince (1370), passed it away to Sir Walter de Paveley, and in his Family it remained untill the latter End of Richard the second, (1399) and then it was conveyed to Vaux of the County of North-Hampton, and there made its abode untill the latter End of Henry the sixth (1461), and then it was alienated to John Grene Esquire, and he died possest of it in fourth year of Edward the fourth (1465); and in this Family did the Title reside, untill the Beginning of Henry the eighth (1509), and then it was demised to Beversea, and Humphrey Beversea, .....

Margaret King is possibly related to the ‘Kings’ mentioned in the pardon related to Cade’s rebellion, see 1450.

 1495 – Beckenham unknown but Carew linked to Sympson’s Place. Kent Arch. Ref 150. Sir Ric Carew to Jn Oxenbrigge, clk, Thos Fenys Lord Dacre, Sir Thos Fenys, Sir Wm Scot, Sir Godard Oxenbrigge, Sir Jn Scot, Ric Sakevyle & Wm Pelham, esqs. Manor of Maytham w/10a mead in Beckenham, plus 3 large manors in Surrey. £1000. (51/359 no. 18) 4 Hen VIII (1495)

This small area of mead in Beckenham belonging to Carew(Carreu) may relate as a remnant of land which passed via Stanlow to Brograve of Kelsey. The Manors in Surrey could be any of the several that belonged to the Carews.

 1496 – Beckenham Rectory; Robert Bekyngham claims that Edward Brograve owes him 4m(marks). Robert B. claims that at London on 10/09/1496 he demised to Edward B. the rectory of Beckenham, Kent, with all its fruits, oblations, tenths, and other dues of the same rectory, to be had and occupied by the same EB from the feast of the annunciation of St Mary then next following (25/03/1497) until the same feast then next following (25/03/1498), namely, for one whole year, at an annual rent of £18, payable to RB at the feasts of the nativity of St John the Baptist (24/06/1497), Michaelmas (29/09/1497), Christmas (25/12/1497), and Easter (15/04/1498) in equal portions. RB says that by force of this demise EB had and occupied the aforesaid rectory from the same 10/09/1496, for one entire year then next following. RB says that of the £4 10s payment of the aforesaid £18 annual rent which was due at Christmas 1497, EB did not pay 40s, which same 40s is in arrears and a parcel of the aforesaid 4m debt. RB also says that at London on the same aforesaid 10/09/1496 EB bought from him 2 cartloads of hay for 13s 4d, which hay has not been paid for. Together the 40s arrears of rents and 13s 4d from the sale of hay add up to the said 4m debt. Damages are claimed at £10. See 1500, Brograve would have received the fruits, oblations and tenths from the parish and withheld some rent. The Brograves were also receiving rents from tenants  of their Kelseys estate. Other cases and the subsequent indebtedness of the Brograves will eventually lead to the sale of Kelsey to Burrell in 1688.

1496 – Langley and Kent House?; 14th June Henry Fyncham owned lands in Beckenham (Langley?) and 3rd August Stephen Fabian owned Kent House (G.W.Tookey notes from Kent Archive)

1498 – Kent House? Foot of Fine; Fyncham was connected with Kent House as his wife Elizabeth is Stephen Fabyan’s daughter, see 1501 and this may relate to a lease of all or part of Kent House. G.W.Tookey also records Fyncham selling land but puts the date at 31st July from Kent Archive records.

CP 25/1/117A/347, number 240.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Two weeks from St John the Baptist, 13 Henry VII [8 July 1498].

Parties:

William Botery and William Bromwell', querents, and Henry Fyncham and Elizabeth, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 1 dove-cot, 150 acres of land, 11 acres of meadow, 71 acres of pasture and 70 acres of wood in Bekenham. (300 acres)

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Henry and Elizabeth have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of William Botery, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Elizabeth to William and William and the heirs of William Botery for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

William and William have given them 100 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

William Buttery, William Bramwell, Henry Fincham, Elizabeth Fincham

Places:

Beckenham

1498 - Hilary Term ; Court of Common Pleas;

Kent trespass: taking Fyncheham, Henry Brogreve, Edward, of Bekenham, gent
Fyncham of Kent House and possibly of Langley is encroached upon by Brogreve(Brograve) of Kelsey?

d

1284

Kent

trespass

Grenerigge, William; Hochynson, Richard; Holand, Robert

Holden, Robert, of Bekenham

1498 - Hayes, West Wickham etc.; TNA Reference: C 146/715 Description: Grant by Richard Heyman, citizen and barber of London, Master Robert Blakwall, one of the King's Masters in Chancery, Thomas Nutford, citizen and draper of London, and John Payne, of Mylborne, co. Cambridge, gentleman, to John Caunton, citizen and hurer of London, and Katherine his wife, John Petley, of Downe, Kent, yeoman, William Degons, grocer, Edward Bellowe, 'hattermarchaunt,' and Richard Luntley, hurer, citzens of London, of land and tenements, etc, in the parishes of Hese (Hayes), Westwikham, and Westerham, and formerly belonged to John Hevere, of Hayes aforesaid. Appointment of Thomas Shot, of Hayes, husbandman, attorney to deliver seisin: Kent Dated: Hayes, 6 July, 14 Henry VII Note: Fragment of seal Date: 1498-1499]

1499 - Beckenham Manor (relevant to) Post Mortem Inquisition at the death of Sir John Heveningham, husband of Alice Bruyn. Although this does not mention the moiety of Beckenham Manor belonging to Alice and carried via her heirs down to Clement Harleston, Hevingham is mentioned in other documents in association with Beckenham Manor. The various inquisitions for Alice, Elizabeth and any of their six husbands help trace the heredity of the manor although Beckenham is a minor part of their overall properties.

JOHN HEVENYNGHAM, knight.
Writ
 23 April, 14 Henry VII; inquisition the last day of October, 15 Henry VII.
Philippa, late duchess of York, and lady of the Isle of Wight, was seised of the under-mentioned manor of Southwekyngdon and two acres of land in Stifford in fee and advowsons of Southwekyngdon and Stifford in her demesne as of fee and right, and, being so seised, by charter gave them to Maurice Bruyn, knight, and Elizabeth, then his wife, and the heirs of their bodies issuing, with remainder in default to Maurice’s right heirs. The said Maurice and Elizabeth were seised thereof accordingly in fee tail, and, being so seised, had issue Henry Bruyn, knight, who had issue Alice and Elizabeth and died; and afterwards the said Maurice died, and the said Elizabeth survived him and was seised thereof, viz. of the manor in fee tail and of the advowsons as of fee and right, by the form of the gift; and afterwards the said Alice took to husband John Berners, esquire, and the said Elizabeth took to husband Thomas Tyrell, esquire, which John Berners died and the said Alice survived him and afterwards took to husband Robert Harleston, esquire, and the same Robert and Alice had issue John, and the same Robert died and the said Alice survived him; and the said Elizabeth, late the wife of Maurice, afterwards died, seised as aforesaid, after whose death the said manor and advowsons descended to the said Alice, and Elizabeth wife of the said Thomas Tirell, cousins and heirs of the said Maurice and Elizabeth of their bodies begotten, viz. daughters of Henry, son and heir of the said Maurice and Elizabeth, whereby the said Alice in her own right and the said Thomas Tirell and Elizabeth, in right of the said Elizabeth, entered on the said manor, &c. and were seised thereof, &c.; and the said Alice being so seised took to husband John Hevenyngham, knight, named in the writ, whereby the said John and Alice and the said Thomas and Elizabeth, in right of the said Alice and Elizabeth, were seised together and without division (insimul et pro indiviso) thereof, &c., and the said John and Alice had issue George, and afterwards the said Alice died, and both the said John, and the said Thomas and Elizabeth, survived her, and the said John after her death held a moiety of the premises as tenant by the curtesy and was seised thereof in his demesne as of free tenement, and died so seised.
Clement Harleston, son of the said John Harleston son of the said Robert Harleston and Alice his wife is next heir of the said Alice late the wife of the said John Hevenyngham of her body begotten; and the said Clement Harleston the son and one William Tyrell son of the said Thomas Tyrell and Elizabeth his wife, are cousins and next heirs of the said Maurice and Elizabeth, late his wife, of their bodies begotten in form aforesaid, and the said Clement is 5 years old and more, and the said William 30 years old and more. The said John Hevenyngham died 10 May last, and the aforesaid (sic) Thomas (written over erasure) Hevenyngham the son is next heir of the said John Hevenyngham, and is 30 years old and more.
The said John Hevenyngham was seised of the other under-mentioned manors, &c., in fee, and, being so seised, thereof enfeoffed James Hobart, the king’s attorney, John Yaxlee, serjeant-at-law, John Jermy, esquire, and William Coke, the younger, who survive, together with other, since deceased, for the performance of his last will, whereby he directed that his executors should take the issues and profits thereof for half a year from his decease, and that thereafter Thomas Hevenyngham, esquire, his son and heir should have the said manors, &c., to hold to him and the heirs male of his body. He died 10 May, 14 Henry VII. The said Thomas Hevenyngham, esquire, aged 50 and more, is his son and heir. Cf. Nos. 306, 307, 425, 527.
Essex; Manor and advowson of Southwekyngdon, worth 40l., held of the king, as of the honor of Hereford, by service of one knight’s fee.
Two acres of land in Stifford, and the advowson of two parts of the church of Stifford to the said 2a. belonging, worth 6s. 8d., held of the lord Grey, service unknown.
Manor of Totham, worth 10l., held of the king, as of the honor of Hagnet, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
Manor of Goldanger, held of the king, as of the honor aforesaid, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
Manor of Bergehalle, or Bregehall, held of the king, as of the honor of Rayley, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
Manor of Flethall, and a mill in Styfford, held of the king as of the same honor, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
C. Series II. Vol
. 14. (140.) E. Series II. File 293. (16.) (BHO)

1500circa – Nicholas Brograve (of Kelseys) is involved in Chancery cases concerning property. To be researched further (TNA)

This and the following two entries for Nicholas, Edward and William Brograve imply some improper actions by the whole family?

1500 - Court of Common Pleas;
Court of Common Pleas, CP 40/954, rot. 186d

Term: Michaelmas 1500
County: London
Writ type: Debt (other); Debt (sale of goods)
Damages claimed: £10
Case type: Real action / rents / damage to real estate; Sale of goods

Pleading: Robert Bekyngham. claims that Edward Brograve owes him 4m. Robert B. claims that at London on 10/09/1496 he demised to Edward B. the rectory of Beckenham, Kent, with all its fruits, oblations, tenths, and other dues of the same rectory, to be had and occupied by the same EB from the feast of the annunciation of St Mary then next following (25/03/1497) until the same feast then next following (25/03/1498), namely, for one whole year, at an annual rent of £18, payable to RB at the feasts of the nativity of St John the Baptist (24/06/1497), Michaelmas (29/09/1497), Christmas (25/12/1497), and Easter (15/04/1498) in equal portions. RB says that by force of this demise EB had and occupied the aforesaid rectory from the same 10/09/1496, for one entire year then next following. RB says that of the £4 10s payment of the aforesaid £18 annual rent which was due at Christmas 1497, EB did not pay 40s, which same 40s is in arrears and a parcel of the aforesaid 4m debt. RB also says that at London on the same aforesaid 10/09/1496 EB bought from him 2 cartloads of hay for 13s 4d, which hay has not been paid for. Together the 40s arrears of rents and 13s 4d from the sale of hay add up to the said 4m debt. Damages are claimed at £10.

Pleading: EB defends and seeks licence to imparl as far as Hilary term 1501.

Postea text: postea 1 - further licence to imparl, forwarding the case as far as Easter term 1501.

  Court of Common Pleas, CP 40/954, rot. 234d

Term: Michaelmas 1500
County: Kent
Writ type: Trespass (force and arms)
Damages claimed: £10
Case type: Housebreaking; Taking of goods

Pleading: William Brograve is in mercy for many defaults. William Botery and William Bromwell claim that on 10/03/1499 William Brograve used force and arms to break their close at Beckenham, Kent, where he felled and carried off their trees and underwood to the value of 100s. The trees and underwood taken were, namely, 60 oak trees, 20 ash trees, and twenty cartloads of underwood. Damages are claimed at £10.
Pleading: William Brograve defends and seeks licence to imparl as far as Hilary term 1501. (BHO)



1500 - Kenthouse: (This case relates some ownership and occupation of Kent House)
Court of Common Pleas, CP 40/951, rot. 115 Term: Hilary 1500 County: Kent Writ type: Trespass (force and arms) Damages claimed: £20
Damages awarded: 3s 4d
Costs: 20s
Case type: Housebreaking; Real action / rents / damage to real estate; Taking of goods; Trespass (chattels)
Pleading: Henry Fyncham. and John Henley. claim that on 24/03/1497 John Fabyan. used force and arms to break their close at Beckenham, Kent, to seize and carry off their goods and chattels to the value of 20m, and allowed his livestock to trample and consume their grass to the value of 100s. Henry Fyncham and John Henley say that the goods and chattels taken were, namely: 2 benches; 6 stools; 2 millstones; 2 andirons; 2 feather beds; and 4 mattresses. The livestock which trampled and consumed the grass was, namely, horses, oxen, cows, and sheep. HF and JH say that this livestock was in their close on diverse days over a period of four months next following the aforesaid 24/03/1497. Damages are claimed at £20. Pleading: John Fabyan says that he is innocent and puts himself upon the country, and the plaintiffs, HF and JH put themselves likewise. Order to the sheriff of Kent to make a jury come at the octave of the Purification 1500.
Postea text: postea 1 - the jury between the arties is placed in respite as far as Easter term in five weeks 1500.
Postea text: postea 2 - to this day comes defendant JF and plaintiffs HF and JH. A jury comes and says on oath that JF is innocent of seizing and carrying off the aforesaid chattels. The jury also says that a certain Stephen Fabyan. was seised in his demesne and as of fee of one messuage called 'Kenthous' and 300 acres of land with appurtenances at Beckenham, in which the supposed trespass took place. So seised in his lifetime prior to the time of the supposed trespass, the same SF and the aforesaid JF being together in a certain house of the aforesaid messuage together said that that same Stephen Fabyan wished (vellet) the profits of the same tenement and lands during his lifetime, and that after the death of SF, JF and his heirs should have the same messuage and lands with appurtenances in perpetuity. Later SF and JF withdrew from that same house into a certain field which was part of the aforesaid 300 acres of land and then SF said again that he wished to have the value of the profits from the messuage and lands with appurtenances during his life, and for JH to have the messuage and lands after his death. Upon this SF then gave drink, to whichever of William T., Robert W., William B., and others who had peen present until this point, and requested them to testify to his words. And the jury say on oath that if it is the will of the law that nothing be transferred by the words of SF nor anything be enfeoffed, then the jury say that SF later died so seised in his demesne and as of fee, after whose death the same messuage and lands descended to a certain Elizabeth (F.) now the wife of plaintiff HF, as one of the daughters and heirs of the late SF, and to plaintiff JH as grandson of the late SF, namely as the son of Katherine (F.) another of SF's daughters. At the time of SF’s death, JH in his own right and HF by right of his wife Elizabeth Fabyan entered the aforesaid messuage and lands, and continued in possession of them for around the space of one month then next following. Thereafter, at the time of the aforesaid supposed trespass, defendant JF made entry into the same property and continued in possession of it for the 27 weeks then next following. Thereafter, plaintiffs JH and HF re-entered the property. And the jury say that defendant JF, for the 27 weeks he was in possession, allowed his cattle to trample and consume grass upon the messuage and lands just as JH and HF alleged. The jury assesses JH and HF’s damages at 3s 4d and their costs at 20s. Therefore, the decision is that JH and HF are to recover from JF costs and damages of 23s 4d. JF is to be arrested. JH and HF are in mercy for false claim against JF concerning the seizing and carrying off of the aforesaid goods and chattels, concerning which JF is quit.Postea text: postea 3 - 10/07/1501 HF and JH come before the court and acknowledge satisfaction of the aforesaid damages. Therefore, JF is quit.Case notes: The jury recounts a verbal transmission of property which the justices decide is invalid.

1500 – 14th January; John Hert sells to John Stile and others including Henry Fyncham land in Beckenham between Clay Hill and Tootswood (KA). 21st February John Hert gives to John Stile warranty of lands called Le Clay in Beckenham (Harleian 112A9). 3rd July reference to Henry Fyncham’s land called Kenthouseland (KA).

1500 - Unidentified properties Foot of Fine. See 1456, Causten (spelling variations) already has property, maybe this is him reclaiming some leased property. A Joan Cawston daughter of Henry is buried in 1576 and a few other Cawstons are in burial records from 1562. William may have died before burials were registered. One acre of marsh could imply by the Ravensbourne.

CP 25/1/117A/348, number 305.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

The day after St Martin, 16 Henry VII [12 November 1500].

Parties:

William Causton' (or William Canston'), querent,(Plaintiff) and Andrew Lyt[yl]grome and Margaret, his wife, deforciants.(One who keeps out of possession the rightful owner of an estate.

Property:

A third part of 4 messuages, of 80 acres of land, of 2 acres of meadow, of 4 acres of wood and of 1 acre of marsh in Westwykham, Bekenham, Bromeley and Lewesham.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Andrew and Margaret have acknowledged the third part of the tenements to be the right of William, as that which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed it from themselves and the heirs of Margaret to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty by Andrew and Margaret for themselves and the heirs of Andrew.

For this:

William has given them 20 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

William Cawston (or William Canston), Andrew Littlegroom, Margaret Littlegroom

Places:

West Wickham, Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham


1501 – An entry in the Treasury of Receipts dated 22nd of May in the 10th year of Henry VIII, is of interest:
"Costys ande charges hade and made by the Kinge is Comaundment opon the makinge of a newe barke namyde the Kateryn Plesuance for the transportynge of his grace to Calice. Xxij(22nd) daye of Maye Ao x Hen. VIII. Payde also to Henry Kynge of becknam for the carriage of a xi (eleven) lode of tymber from chelsam (Probably Chelsham near Addington in Surrey) – at ijs (eleven shillings) eny lode xxijs (twentytwo shillings). Itm to him pd for ix (9) lode cariage out of bromley pishe at xvj (16) di lode xijs (twelve shillings)."

The ship referred to was the one which conveyed Henry VIII to Calais in June 1520, when that monarch met Francis I of France at the Field of the Cloth of Gold, at Ardres, near Calais. (source: R.Borrowman)

Henry Kynge is recorded in the 1517 Lay Subsidy Roll taxation and shown elsewhere in 1519 as transporting timber for shipbuilding. He is apparently a carter and the taxation is presumably for his property of carts and horses or oxen. Two Henry Kings are in Beckenham burials in the 1540’s.

1501 (see 1504) - Kent House; National Archive ref C 131/87/2 Related to half of Kent House. Henry Fincham being in debt to John Stile (of Langley?) His property is transferred to Style upon execution of the writ in 1504. This will have some repercussions as Fincham’s wife Elizabeth  has to be evicted later and this results in some legal actions described in a lengthy document held at Kent Archive which occur after John Stile’s death and Elizabeth Stile’s remarriage to James Yarford. (see 1509)

Debtor: Henry Fincham, formerly a citizen and mercer, of London.
Creditor: John Style, citizen and mercer, of London.
Amount: £100.
Before whom: Henry Colet, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster.
When taken: 22/03/1501
First term: 24/06/1501
Last term: 24/06/1501
Writ to: Sheriff of Kent
Sent by: Chancery
Endorsement: William Crowmere, Sheriff, replies that the execution of the writ appears in the schedule hereto annexed.

Inquisition and return: Date to be returned: 01/7/1504. The Sheriff had replied to a previous writ that on the day of the recognisance Henry (Fincham) was seised of half a messuage in Beckenham, called Kenthous, and half of 60 acres of land, 100 acres of pasture, and 20 acres of meadow in Beckenham [in Bromley-&-Beckenham Hundred] and Lewisham [in Blackheath Hundred], worth £3 6s. 8d. He also had certain chattels, namely: 2 oscula pacis, called Paxs, two curtains with iron rings, an old breviary, 2 small bells, called sacring bells {sakering bellys}, 2 old altar-cloths, a stone for an altar, a corporal case, a vestment, an alb, with other vestments necessary for a priest, a noted missal, 8 images, a round cassock dyed violet in grain, trimmed with grey fur, a long cassock of the same colour, 4 cruets, a woollen cloth, called a blanket, 4 blankets of fustian, a coverlet with a lion on it, another coverlet of a green colour, 2 painted cloths, one of St Katherine, and the other of St Barbara, a bench-cover, 4 chairs, called Spruce Chairs, a canopy, called a Spire, a pair of cups, an old carpet, 4 brass pots, 6 brass pans, a table, called a dressing-board, 7 shelves, 3 plain boards, 2 pot-hooks, an iron bar, other knives, utensils, a grindstone, a water-trough, 2 half-hundred-weights, 2 weights of iron, called hundredweights, 2 malt vats, a pound of paper, a French book, a short tunic, called a waistcoat, a chafing-dish, 3 tubs, a crabb-apple {crabbe} press, a mortar ..., a cupboard, a pottle pot, 63 lb. of broken brass, 80½ lb. of lead weights, 2 candle-cases, 4 lattices for putting next to the fire, a stool, a form, weed-hooks, certain grain growing in the ground and in the barn, and other goods: worth altogether £24 10s. 10d. Henry was not found in the bailiwick. Attached to this is a letter from the Sheriff, dated 30/06/1504, which says that he has delivered to John Style half of the messuage and lands in the writ and the goods and chattels. [a duplicate of No. 4 and No. 18] (BHO)

 
1501 - Unkown messuage of 47 acres; a Margery Midday is buried at St.Georges in 1545

CP 25/1/117A/349, number 345.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

Link:

Image of dorse of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

One week from St Martin, 17 Henry VII [18 November 1501]. And afterwards one week from St Hilary in the same year [20 January 1502].

Parties:

Thomas Marowe and John More, querents, and Edmund Midday and Lettice, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

1 messuage, 24 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow, 10 acres of pasture and 5 acres of wood in Bekenham. (47acres total)

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Edmund and Lettice have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of John, as those which John and Thomas have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Lettice to Thomas and John and the heirs of John for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

Thomas and John have given them 40 pounds sterling.


Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)

Persons:

Thomas Marrow, John Moore, Edmund Middey, Lettice Middey

Places:

Beckenham

 
1502 – Kent House;  Short title: Brograve v Fyncham. Plaintiffs: Edward Brograve, lessee of Beckenham... ref; C 1/257/50Short title: Brograve v Fyncham. Plaintiffs: Edward Brograve, lessee of Beckenham church. Defendants: Henry Fyncham, son-in-law of Stephen Fabyan. Subject: Action of trespass for taking the torches and tapers used at the said Stephen's funeral in the church. Kent. Seems Fyncham was taking some torches etc as possible memento of his father in laws funeral which Brograve objected to?  See nex entry and others where Brograves were of some questionable practices.

1502 - Hilary Term; Court of Common Pleas; Sprever, William, junior; and Broun, William sue for trespass; Brogreve, Edward, of London, gent; Lowen, Thomas, of Bekenham, collier; Godfrey, Richard, of Bekenham, laborer; Morys, Richard, of Bekenham, laborer; Kitman, Robert, of Bekenham, laborer; Colyns, Thomas, of Bekenham, laborer; Lowen, Thomas, of Bekenham, laborer; Style, Edmund, of Mepeham, horse collar maker; Toppesfeld, Robert, of Batersey, Surrey, laborer  (corrections;  Brograve , Tappesfield, Tapsfield)

And Edward Brograve brought up again for debt?


London
debt de Giglis, John Paulo, merchant of Luca; Quynyso, Francis, merchant of Luca Brograve, Edward, of Bekynham, gent

1503 - Kent House; Memorandum of Acknowledgement (November). A transfer of the property by inhereitance of Katherine and Elizabeth Fabyan daughters of Stephen Fabyan. Elizabeth married to Henry Fyncham.

John Fabyan of Bekenham, gentleman, son and heir of John Fabyan, clothier of London, to John Henley of Cranebroke co. Kent, 'clothman,' son of Robert Henley of London, draper, and Katharine his wife, a daughter and heir of Stephen Fabyan late of Bekenham, gentleman, and Henry Fyncham late of London, mercer, and Elizabeth his wife, Stephen's other daughter, their heirs and assigns. The like of Kenthous manor in Bekenham and all the lands etc. late of Stephen in Bekenham and Leuesham co. Kent and Bateresey co. Surrey. Dated 1 Sept., 19 Henry VII. (Calendar of Close Rolls, PRO, BHO and Hathitrust.org).

Some curiosity exists here as Henry Fyncham was in debt to John Style in 1501 through Court of Chancery and Style may have acquired half of Kent House by way of payment of the debt. Also John Fabyan looks like his father was brother to Stephen Fabyan who was a City of London Alderman who acquired Kent House perhaps as far back as 1469. Stephen had two daughters who inherit Kent House. How John Fabyan comes to be ‘of Bekenham’ is not absolutely clear. The Fabyans and Finchams appear to be occupying different parts or moieties of Kent House Farm. Recently (October 2022) we have the research of G.W.Tookey who explored references regarding Stile/Fyncham etc and Langley/Kenthouse/Simpsons Place. The situation was complex involving cases of litigation.

From Calendar of Close Rolls (Public Record Office)

 
1503 – Kelsey; William Brograve the elder leaves a will but no transcript is available. Summarised thus in the Extracted Probate records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury; 1503 Brograve, William, thelder, St. Barth: the little, St. Marg. Lothbury, London; Bekenham, Kent.

We have his date of birth as 1458 in Braffin, Hertfordshire and several connections with Hertford/Hertfordshire are made in Brograve wills.

1503/4 – Sympson’s Place, Bromley/Beckenham boundary; Court of Common Pleas, to be identified but possibly Sympson’s Place, Bromley. Thomas Brandon is the brother of William Brandon who married Elizabeth Bruyn of Beckenham Manor. About 350 acres in all, widely dispersed possibly including the mill at Glassmill Lane but another mill called Monks Mill was in the area. But no house or mansion is mentioned but we look for further evidence. Horsburgh describes this as Sympson’s Place and that a court case ensued disputing ownership as the property passed to John Style. Horsburgh describes Guldeford etc as acting as trustees for Style. We have to refer back to the transfer from Mercy Carreu to Robert Sympson

 CP 25/1/117A/350, number 407. Image of document at AALT Image of document at AALT

Kent. Westminster. Three weeks from Easter, 19 Henry VII [28 April 1504].

Richard Guldeford', knight, Thomas Brandon', knight, Edmund Dudley, esquire, and John Gardyner, querents,

and Robert Sympson', gentleman, and Cecily, his wife, deforciants.

7 messuages, 7 gardens, 1 mill, 1 dove-cot, 160 acres and half an acre of land, 43 acres of meadow, 63 acres of pasture, 68 acres of wood and 20 acres of heath in Bromlegh', Bekenham, Leuesham, Chesilhurst, Orpyngton' and Hese. Plea of covenant. Robert and Cecily have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Richard, as those which Richard, Thomas, Edmund and John have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Cecily to Richard, Thomas, Edmund and John and the heirs of Richard for ever. Warranty. For this:Richard, Thomas, Edmund and John have given them 200 pounds sterling.(possible mistake for marks)

Possibly neither of the querents occupied the land i.e. 7 messuages would have tenants?

 
1504 and 1528 – Ref; C 131/87/18 Debtor: Henry Fincham, formerly a citizen and mercer, of London.

Creditor: John Style, citizen and mercer, of London.

Amount: £100.

Before whom: Henry Colet, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster.
When taken: 22/05/1501

First term: 24/06/1501

Last term: 24/06/1501

Writ to: Sheriff of Kent.

Sent by: Chancery

Endorsement: William Crowmere, Sheriff, replies that Henry Fincham was not found in his bailiwick. He has valued his property as appears in the inquisition. Inquisition and return: Date to be returned: 21/04/1504. Attached is: (a) An inquisition made at Beckenham [Bromley-&-Beckenham Hundred] in Kent on 13/02/1504 before William Crowmere, Sheriff [a duplicate of that attached to 87/2]. Also, (b) An inquisition made at Southwark on 21/03/1528 before Ralph Shirley, Sheriff. Henry Fincham has no goods or chattels. At the time of the recognisance he was seised of divers lands and tenements, namely: half of six acres of land lying in a certain field, called Cattesfeld, half of two acres of land lying in a certain field, called Wylmott Hawe, and half of three acres lying in a certain croft, and a toft, called le Strode, in Penge in the Parish of Battersea in Surrey [Brixton Hundred], worth altogether 3s. 8d. after expenses. [a duplicate of No. 2 and No. 4] The National Archives, Kew

 
1504 - Kelsey? This transcript of William Brograve’s will has obvious errors or omissions due to the difficulty of reading ancient text. Some (corrections) have been included. William appears to have been a draper of the City of London.

Will of 6 Sept 1504. 19 Henry VII. William Brograve the elder late Citezn and draper of London. To be buried in honest manner without pompe or pryd of the world within the parissh chirche of Bekenham in Kent wheere as the body of Elizabeth late my wiff lyeth buried. To high awter of the same chirch where as I am parisshioner for my thithes etc. 20s.
   Vnto my doughters Alice (and M)argaret xx mrc. Vnto Elizth Brugrave my dou. in law xx mr. To my son Edmond Brugrave 20 mrc. 
   To eaych of the prison houses of Ludgate Newgate Kyss ?tenche and Marchalsey 20s. 
   To Elizth Ball my servunt xls (11shillings?) a fetherbed 2 peyer of shetts a peyer of blanketts and yerely vj loads of wood to be delivered to hir doughter during hir naturall liff ij boad at fest of Mghelmas and between the fest of Mghelmas and or lady day in lent 4 load. 
   To Anne Brograve dou. of Wm. Brograve late my sone 40s 
   To Richard Omer, Rice (sic) Eyre John Batell my servunts and Richard Elyn servant to my sone Robert every of them 20s. 
   Vnto Alice late my servunt 6/8 John Ball my servunt 6/8. To John Ball 20s. 
   Residue to Robert my son my extr. Last will of my lands and tenements in Kent and Citie of London I will Robert Brograve my sone have all in parish of Beckenham in Kent. If he decesse without heires males then to remayne unto Wm. Brograve son of John Brograve thelder my son and of Janne Fogg late doughter of Sr. John Fogg Knyght. If Wm. Brograve decesse without heires males which God defind all lands and tenements to the seid John Brograve schall remayne sone and heyre of seid John Brograve my sone to ?h and to ?h to seid John Brogravge the yonger theires males. And if he decesse without heires males and if he decesse to Richard Brograve my sone. If he decesse then to Nicholas Brograve my sone and heires males. If he decesse to George Brograve my sone. If he decesse to Henry Brograve my son and if he decesse then to the right heires of Robert Brograve my sone.
   I will Elizth Ball my servunt have my tenement which oon(one) Chanterell late dwelled in for hir life. 
  I will seid Robert my son have as well all thoo my lands tenements etc. in the townes parisshes and felds of Lewsham and Depford in Kent as all thoo my lands and tenements in parisshes of Seynt Bartlum the litill and Seynt Margaret in Lothbury within the Citie of London he to pay to George and Henry Brograve my son a yerely ?ynyt rent of £5 to every of them. Feoffees to make unto the seid George and Henry duryng theyer lyves a deed of annitie with clawsse of distresse.
   Witnesse John Worshopp notary Sr. Hugh Thomasson Sr. Nicholas Saunders and other ?
   [Pd. 12 Oct 1503 see Regr F at Canterbury]

 And in the National Archive we find;
C 1/300/24 Short title: Cowlerd v Brograve.
Plaintiffs: John Cowlerd and Robert Clerkson.
Defendants: Robert Brograve.
Subject: Detention of deeds relating to lands in Beckenham. Kent1504-1515

 We find the primary heir of Beckenham property Robert dies in 1546.

 
1505 - This will for Henry Violet mentioning land in Surrey, Lewisham, Bromley and Beckenham might be applied to anywhere locally. It does add to the complexity of landownership. The supposed transfer of Langley via the Violets to the Styles is disputed by Len Hevey and this will evidences that the Violets still hold property after Style had acquired Langley. The involvement of Henry Kyng and Kempsall is interesting as they appear in other entries as yeoman landowners, see 1501. As Henry Violet here directs that his woods in Beckenham be sold and the money divided between his sons. Maybe the Styles buy the land to add to Langley? But as late as the mid 18th C. woods like Barnfield Wood near Langley belonged to the Tolsons. Without a plan of the lands in question it is impossible to be sure. St.George’s burial records show members of the Violet family from 1539 until 1631 including John buried 1547. A Robert Violet is buried in 1549 but no record of a Stephen who may have died before 1539 but had the bequest of  land in Lewisham and Bromley so may have moved away from the Parish as may his mother Agnes.  Another Henry is buried in 1561 who may be the son of Robert. The wife Agnes may have remarried which was a common occurrence, several “Agneses” appear in burials after 1539 but she may have died before records began. Dividing the property between Stephen and Robert appears to follow the custom of gavelkind and the daughters some degree of dowry. Of the executors William Violet is presumed to be a brother also dying before records began and possibly another local landowner. As Henry here requests  burial  beside his  (first)  wife he must have remarried.

 
The Will: 1 Aprill 1505. 20 Henry VIJ. Henry Violet To be buried in churchyarde of Beknam beside my wif. To high awter 20d. To said church of Becknam a Cowe Buloke of ij yeres (2 years) of all for the maynteynyng of a tap (?taper) before thymage of our lady in the said church. To the parish church of Bromeley 6/8.
   Vnto Agnes my wif all my goodes etc. in the Countie of Surry and all my lands and tenements in Bromeley and Lewisham in Kent duryng her lif. If she kepe not laufull ? then Stephen my sone shall re enter.
   I will my said son Stephen shall have alle my lands and tenements in Bromeley and Lewisham after the decesse of Agnes my wif
   I will Robertt my son have all my lands and tenements in Bekenam when 21. 
   If they dye without heirs then to the next heir of me Henry Violet. 
   I will all the woods that growen in the parish of Bekenam be sold and the money egally devided between Robert and Stephen my sonnes.
   To Isabell and Kateryn my doughters either £3.6.8. To Margery my doughter 26/8.
   I bequeth vnto fare childe [sic] a bulloke of a yere olde.
   Residue vnto myn exors to dispose it for the welth of my soule.
   Exors William Violet and Henry Kyng. Wittnes Sr. Hugh pisshe preest of Bekename, Thos. Kempsall and Wm. Crokesone.
   Probate Lamehith 26 June 1505 by Wm. Violett and Henry Kyng exors.

 
1505 Bargain & Sale 1) John Brownger of Addington 2) John Style citizen & Mercer of London re messuage & land in Addington (boundaries given) Surrey Archives 181/19/4

Assumed to be a purchase by John Style prior to his death. Whether this land adjoins Langley remains to be seen, the document needs to be researched further.

 
1505 – Langley: Death and Will of John Style, Mercer. Both Philipot and Hasted had recorded that a John Violet had held Langley and sold it to John Style about the beginning of Henry VIII which would be 1509 but the will of John Style dated July 1505 show he held it from circa 1500. The probate granted in October mentions lands in Bekynham (sic) and a dwelling at Langley for his wife for her lifetime or until she remarries. The will of Style and the slightly earlier will of Henry Violet raise questions about exactly where and what property is involved and whether John Style could have purchased Violet’s woods following Violet’s instructions in his will. John Violet has not been traced by us or by Len Hevey who made several investigations and found that there is no record of the Violets having Langley and that Langley may have passed through Fincham and Fabian who were also involved with Kent House Farm. See 1501 Fyncham v. Style. There are reasons to doubt that Fincham had any possession of Langley.

There are several Violets in Beckenham burials but only after records began in 1539, the name ‘John’ appears three times after 1547 and of course Henry and William Violet are present as per Henry’s will of 1505.

The will of John Style proved in 1505 mentions Langley and “Bekynham”. In 1507 Humphrey Style is only 6 so only about 4 in 1505, dob 1501.

 


John Style leaves his estate to his son John or sons or daughters surviving and coming of age. The son John died young. To his wife he says “I will she have her dwelling at Langley as long as the profit is….”

The will mentions an eldest son John who according to evidence in the will of Elizabeth Style who had remarried a James Yarford, John must have died and Humphrey Style is named by her as the beneficiary of all her lands. See appendix The Styles family of Langley. John and Elizabeth are believed to have had at least seven children of whom some died before John. In an Inquisition in 1507 we find six year old Humphrey Style named as heir as evidence that John Jnr died circa 1506/7.

Anne Sutton of Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History published an account of research into London Mercers from Suffolk including many details of the Styles and linked families, Wolstan/Welstane, Bolle/Bulle and Yarford through intermarriage.  There are several links to Ipswich (Ippeswich in Style’s will).

 
1505 – Death of JOHN STYLE (of Langley) late of London, ‘mercer.’

Inquisition dated 1507; Commission of concealments &c., 20 Octoberinquisition 30 October, 23 Henry VII (1507). He died 28 September, 21 Henry VII, seised in fee, inter alia, of the under-mentioned lands &c. in Bekenham. Humphrey Style, aged 6 years and more, is his son and heir. On 29 September, 21 Henry VII, Elizabeth, his widow, entered into the premises and all the lands late of the said John and intruded upon the king’s possession, and took the issues and profits thereof from the said 28 September until Midsummer day following, since when James Jarford, alias Yarford, late of London, ‘mercer,’ and the said Elizabeth, his wife, have intruded upon the said lands and taken the issues and profits thereof. Kent 160a. land, meadow, pasture and wood in Bekenham, late of Robert Symson, worth 8l., held of the king by a rent of 5d. yearly, but by what tenure or by what other services the jurors know not. C. Series II. Vol. 21. (15.)

 

1505 – Langley and Simpson’s Place; The Calendar of Fine Rolls lists landlords or tenants under the king who have died and writs of diem clausit extremum are issued. The phrase diem clausit extremum means he closed his last day, that is, he died. writ of Diem Clausit Extremum is a writ by which the heir of a deceased tenant in capite compelled the escheator to ascertain what land should escheat to the king.

In feudal England, upon learning the death of a tenant, the escheator would hold an inquisition post mortem to learn if the king had any rights to the land. These were often preceded by a writ of diem clausit extremum issued by the king to seize the lands. John Style and Henry Colet are listed, whether the same as the Style and Colet appearing in our timeline we can’t tell for sure. Colet only appears here as mayor of Westminster as signatory of documents. John Style may or may not be the same as of Langley but looks probable as the Inquisition Post Mortem into John Style’s death relates to James Yarford and Style’s widow ‘intruding’ into the property. See entries 1505-1508.

 
1505 - Beckenham and Foxgrove; Post Mortem Inquisition Writ 29 November, inquisition 2 February, 21 Henry VII.WALTER FITZ.

Roger Fitz was seised in fee of the under-mentioned lands &c. in Leuesham and Bekenham, and by his charter indented dated at Leuesham, 20 March, 19 Henry VII, gave them to Peter Bevyll, Roger Holand, William Honychurch, Thomas Ifley, George Harvy, Robert Morley and William Morley, who survive, and the said Walter Fitz, since deceased, and their heirs, to the use of Isabel, his wife, now wife of William Atclyff, for life, and after her death to the use of himself and his heirs. Afterwards, to wit, on 28 March, 19 Henry VII, the said Roger by his last will willed that after the death of Isabel the said Peter Bevyll and the others should stand enfeoffed of the said lands &c. to the use of the said Walter, his brother, and the heirs male of his body, and in default of such heirs male to the use of himself, the said Roger and his heirs.
Walter died 3 June last, seised of the other under-mentioned lands &c. in fee tail, to wit, to himself and the heirs of his body. John Fitz, aged 9 years and more, is his son and sole next heir.

Kent; Manor of Rydley, and 100a. land, 20a. wood and 40s. rent in Rydley and Asshe, worth 5l., held of the abbot of the monastery of St. Mary of Graces beside the Tower of London, in right of his church, by service of half a knight’s fee and 33s. 4d. rent yearly.
A messuage and 100a. land in Perystrete in the parish of Northflete, worth 100s., and a messuage, 11a. land and 2a. moor in Bowrestrete in the same parish, worth 14s., held in ‘gavelkend’ of the archbishop of Canterbury by fealty and 33s. 4d. rent.
A messuage, 40a. land, 6a. meadow and 6a. wood in Estgrenewiche, worth 40s., held of the prior of the house of Jesus of Shene, co. Surrey, by fealty and other services or rents unknown.
12 messuages, 200a. pasture, 300a. meadow and 400a. wood in Leuesham and Bekenham, worth 40 marks, held as to the messuages &c. in Leuesham of the said prior of Shene and Thomas, marquess of Dorset, by fealty and 8s. rent, and as to the messuages &c. in Bekenham of William Terell, as of his manor of Bekenham, and Thomas Grene, knight, as of his manor of Foxgroves in Bekenham, by 7s. rent.

 By the above we may deduce that  Fitz had leased for a substantial period or was tenant at will of Manor of Beckenham land belonging to Terell(Tyrell) and Foxgrove Manor land belonging to Grene as well as the land of the Prior of Shene and Marquess of Dorset (Penge and Sydenham perhaps). Dorset owned land in 16 English counties. The Prior of Sheen held the manors of Lewisham and East Greenwich (Greenwich)

 1507 – Inquisition Post Mortem; JOHN STYLE, late of London, ‘mercer.’ Commission of concealments &c., 20 October (fn. 4 “the commission is wanting”)inquisition 30 October, 23 Henry VII (1507). He died 28 September, 21 Henry VII (September 1505), seised in fee, inter alia, of the under-mentioned lands &c. in Bekenham. Humphrey Style, aged 6 years and more, is his son and heir. On 29 September, 21 Henry VII, Elizabeth, his widow, entered into the premises and all the lands late of the said John and intruded upon the king’s possession, and took the issues and profits thereof from the said 28 September until Midsummer day following, since when James Jarford, alias Yarford, late of London, ‘mercer,’ and the said Elizabeth, his wife, have intruded upon the said lands and taken the issues and profits thereof. Kent 160a. land, meadow, pasture and wood in Bekenham, late of Robert Symson, worth 8l., held of the king by a rent of 5d. yearly, but by what tenure or by what other services the jurors know not. C. Series II. Vol. 21. (15.) (source BHO)

 In 1510 Yarford and Elizabeth present a bill to the House of Lords, no details found so far but possibly to appeal for possession of Symsons.

 

Frustratingly we can’t identify his full list of properties believed to include Langley, Simpson’s and Kent House. The following describes his son Humphrey as his heir and establishes a date of birth for Humphrey. Also, describes Elizabeth and James Yarford’s actions regarding Simpson’s Place. A inquisition post mortem documents  in Kent Archive is unfortunately in Latin and defies some translation but we are researching it further.

 


1507 – Symsons Place (AKA Simpsons and Sympsons); the 160 acres matches descriptions in entries for 1505 etc associated with Style, Yarford and Baldry. An interim demise as Symsons ends up with Humphrey Style along with Langley. A later map of Sympsons under the ownership of Hugh Raymond in 1735 describes 88 acres but the adjacent ‘New Farm’ may consist of the remainder unless other land on the Bromley side constitutes the remainder.

1507 – Foxgrove Manor; Inquisition Post Mortem taken on 13 March 1507. In 1505-6 Walter Fitz has Foxgrove under a tenancy from Grene but Foxgrove is not listed or perhaps omitted from this Inquisition or missed when transcribed? Only Northampton properties described but Kent is mentioned among Grene’s ‘writings’.

259. THOMAS GRENE, knight.

Writ 12 November, inquisition 13 March, 22 Henry VII.

Long before his death he was seised of the under-mentioned keepership, but of what estate therein the jurors know not.

Long before his death he was seised in fee of the under-mentioned manors and messuages &c., and by his deed dated 10 March, 15 Henry VII, at Norton Davy, gave to one Thomas Haselwode, esquire, a yearly rent of 5 marks out of his lands &c. in Sewell and Potcote for life, with power of distraint; by virtue of which grant the said Thomas was seised thereof in his demesne as of free tenement.

Similarly, by his writing dated 31 May, 10 Henry VII, at Norton Davy, he appointed William Chaunterell to be his auditor of accounts of all his lordships &c. in cos. Northampton, Leicester, Lincoln, York, Hertford and Kent, and elsewhere in the realm, for life, receiving a fee of 40s. yearly as well from the issues and profits of his lordship or manor of Bukton, Brampton and Pysford, as in his other lands &c. in co. Northampton, with other fees &c. to the same office anciently due and accustomed, and also his daily expenses; by virtue of which grant the said William was and is seised of that office and fee.

Similarly, by his writing dated 1 June, 17 Henry VII, he gave to his beloved in Christ, Edmund Haselwode, gentleman, for good counsel rendered and to be rendered, an annuity of 20s. for life as well from his lands &c. in Great Houghton by Northampton as in all other his lands &c. in Potcote and Higham, with power of distraint; by virtue of which grant the said Edmund was seised thereof in his demesne as of free tenement.

Similarly, by his writing dated 20 June, 17 Henry VII, at Norton Davy, he gave to John Muscote, gentleman, for his counsel &c., 20s. yearly from his lands &c. in Great Dodyngton for life, with power of distraint; by virtue of which grant the said John was seised thereof in his demesne as of free tenement.

He died 9 November last, seised in fee of all the under-mentioned manors and lands &c. Anne Grene, aged 17 years and more, and Maud Grene, aged 13 years and more, are his daughters and heirs.

NORTHAMPTON. Keepership (custodia) of the forest of Wittylwode, held of the king in chief by knight-service; worth nothing beyond reprises.

Manors of Norton Davy, Boughton, Little Brampton, Pysford, Great Houghton and Great Dodyngton, and 30 messuages, 600a. land, 300a. meadow, 1000a. pasture, 20l. rent and 200a. wood in Norton Davy, Boughton, Little Brampton, Pysford, Great Houghton, Great Dodyngton, Sewell, Potcote, Higham Parva, alias Cold Higham, and Midelton; whereof-

The manor of Norton Davy, held of the king in chief by knight-service, and the lands &c. in Norton aforesaid, tenure unknown, are worth 86l. 13s. 4d.

The manors of Boughton and Brampton and the lands &c. in Boughton and Brampton are worth 26l. 10s., tenure unknown;

The manors and lands &c. in Pysford are worth 6l. 10s., tenure unknown;

The manor of Great Houghton and the lands &c. in Houghton aforesaid are worth 8l. 3s. 4d., tenure unknown;

The manor of Great Dodyngton and the lands &c. in Dodyngton aforesaid are worth 13l. 6s. 8d., tenure unknown;

The lands &c. in Sewell, Potcote and Higham Parva are worth 10l., tenure unknown; and

The lands &c. in Midelton are worth 3l. 6s. 8d., tenure unknown.

C. Series II. Vol. 20. (74.)

 

1507 – Kempsall Property, near Wickham Road?  The 1720 Foxgrove Manor map copied in 1766 shows Henry Kempsall Yeoman on land bounded by Oakwood Avenue, Wickham Road and Chancery Lane and fields named Upper, Hither and Further Leasons. This Warranty is for a messuage of 32 acres Whether this 32acres could be contained in that area needs to be confirmed. We cannot say whether these records evidence the transfer of complete properties or are dividing property or even if the property is in one block. A Thomas, son of Thomas Kempsall is buried at St.George’s in 1587 and the Kempsall name is in burial records from 1542 to 1787. A Robert Holden is buried in 1545. The Kempsalls are recorded from 1505, when Thomas witnesses the will of Henry Violett, until the mid 18th Century.

 CP 25/1/117A/351, number 489.

Link:Image of document at AALT

County:Kent.

Place: Westminster.

Date: The day after the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 22 Henry VII [3 February 1507].

Parties: Thomas Kemsale, querent, and Robert Holden' and Joan, his wife, deforciants.

Property: 1 messuage, 16 acres of land, 5 acres of pasture, 5 acres of wood and 6 acres of heath in Bekenham.

Action: Plea of covenant.

Agreement: Robert and Joan have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Thomas, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to him and his heirs for ever.

Warranty: Warranty.

For this: Thomas has given them 20 marks of silver.

Foot of Fine/Final Accord in Latin. See also 1531 etc for Kempsall

1508 -  Sympson’s Place (AKA Symsons/Simpsons); It seems probable that this relates to settlement of the issue of occupation or possession of Symsons by Yarford and Baldry and circa 1511 the cancellation may relate to sale or award by the crown to Yarford or the Style estate? This could relate to more property than Symsons as Yarford is involved with other estates. Sympsons and Langley descend to Humphrey Style.


1508 - Hilary Term cases; A John Pledge is  in burials  for 1559. Langley was said to have been bought from the Violets and though John Style died in 1505, James Yarford had  married  his widow. Whether John Langeley is related to the Langleys  of Beckenham is not know but there's a coincidence of Violets  being present in Bromley.  Yarford is recovering at least two debts here so continuing Style's practice of lending money or managing Style's widows estate? John Style's son Humphrey marries Bridget Bauldrey a daughter of a Thomas Baldrey so may be daughter or granddaughter of the Baldrye listed here. Humphrey and  Baldrye are John Style's executors named in his will and probate.

London debt Style, John, of London, mercer, executors of; (Laurence, Humphrey, parson of St Martin; Baldrye, Thomas, of London; Babham, William) Pleg or Pley, John, of Bekenham, Kent, yeoman
London debt Yerford, James, of London, merchant of the staple Violet, William, of Bekenham, Kent, yeoman; Croxston, William, of Bromley, Kent, yeoman
Kent debt Langeley, John, sheriff of Kent Wodehache, Richard, of Bromley, husbandman; Violett, William, of Bromley, yeoman
London debt Style, John, of London, mercer, executors of; (Laurence, Humphrey, parson of St Martin; Baldri, Thomas, of London; Babham, William) Croxton, William, of Bromley, Kent, husbandman
London debt Yerford, James, of London, mercer Hunt, Thomas, of Bromeley, Kent, cordwainer; Croxston, William, of Bromley, yeoman
Richard Dawe and Brograve appear in other refs ie Dawe is in Cade Rebellion pardons etc.
Kent trespass: taking Brograve, Robert Dawe, Richard, of Bekynham, husbandman; Brouger or Bronger, John, of Bekynham, husbandman

1509 King Henry VIII until 1547

1509 – Sympsons Place? But Broke and Bromwell are mentioned in connection with Kent House according to G.W.Tookey from a Kent Archive document of 1507:

Parties: Richard Broke and William Bromwell, Robert Sympson deceased, John Stile and his wife deceased, James Yarford alias Garford and Elizabeth his wife Places: Beckenham, lands etc (being parcel of land etc in Bromley, Beckenham, Lewisham, Chislehurst, Orpington and Haye) County: Kent (TNA, 1 Henry VIII)

 

1509 – Langley; Philipot and Hasted wrote ‘erroneously’ that about the beginning of Henry. the eighth,(1509)  it was conveyed to John Stiles Esq; who much inlarged the House with a supply of Buildings, and from him is it by Descent devolved to be the instant Possession of his Successor Sir Humphrey Stiles Knight and Baronet.(d1552) (source: Philipot)

But we find John Style died in 1505 and his will probate dated October 1505 is before Henry VIII's accession in 1509. The 1505 will mentions lands in Bekynham (sic) and Langley. See 1505 and other entries describing Symsons between 1505 and 1511. But this record dated 1509 relates some information but Henry Fincham mentioned is more connected with Kent House.

1509;  Langley and Kent House; Kent archive; Bill of James Yarford concerning Kenthouse estate in Beckenham, inherited by his wife Elizabeth, widow of John Style in the reign of Henry VII

Henry Fincham and Elizabeth his wife were living in the house (Kent House) when John Style was awarded it in compensationf for unpaid debt and Elizabeth refused to leave. John Style had her ejected and a fortnight later she died in childbirth. John Stile was accused of her murder and later acquitted but apparently after some fines or bail had been paid.  Yarford and Elizabeth (ex Stile) plead for repayment of the fines or bail monies. It appears that Elizabeth Style was accused by Edward Guildeford of causing Elizabeth Fincham's death We now have a copy of the document and the transcriptions follow, with apologies for any errors in transcribing.

Held At: Kent History and Library Centre

Document Order #:U36/L9

Date:1509

Transcript of James Yarford's plea; (from handwritten text) 

To the right ? ? of our late sovereign lord king Henry the Seventh

In most piteous wife/wise shewith unto your good lordships and ? your humble orators James Yarford of London mercer and Elizabeth his wife late the wife of John Stile late of London mercer that where the late John Stile of late in the said late kings days was put in possession by the Sheriff of kent in a messuage in the said county called Kenthouse in the which Henry Fincham and Elizabeth his wife then dwelled by virtue of an statute of the staple of Westminster of £100 ? the said Henry Fincham was bound to the said John Stile and notwithstanding the said execution and possession thereof made to the said John Stile / yet the said Elizabeth Fincham would in no wise  adboide nor go out of the said house whereupon after by theadvice? Of Thomas ? then servant at the law at bugard Broke the said John Stile sent Henry Comport Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo his servant when the said Elizabeth was at church to the said house and commanded them to keep possession in the same house which so did accordingly and soon after she came again to the same house and brake a pane of a wall at thende? Of the same house and so entered in and after that the same Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo came again and peaceably put the same Elizabeth out of the same house and she seeing she mayye not be suffered there to abide departed there and came to London on foot being with child? And ? a fortnight after she was brought in bed and delivered of a child which is yet in life and the said Elizabeth thereof died as by divers honest women which were at her travail can be reported and proved and after this the said John Stile by sinister means of certain persons was instantly? Conviced of murder and death of the said Elizabeth Fincham and after he was thereof lawfully acquit before Sir Thomas Francis? And other Justices at a session of Gaol ? at Maidstone in the said county and dies after whose death your said oratrice were married together and after the certain malicious persons for to bring them in ? of our said late sovereign lord intentely imagined counterfeted and forged a bill of endightment containing that the said Elizabeth your said oratrice and one Henry Comporte Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo with others unknown the 10th day of May the xyo?th (12th/13th) year of the reign of our late sovereign lord should by force of arms feloniously have entered into the said place called Kenthouse and  that the said Henry Comport with his knee then and there should have given unto the said Elizabeth Fincham then being with child such a stroke that the same Elizabeth Fincham then one fortnight after should have died of the stroke and that the said Elizabeth your said oratrice and the other above named were then and there present feloniously of comforting assisting and maintaining the same Henry in the said deed doing which bill was by the said malicious persons delivered to a jury then being charged for divers other things before certain commissioners of our said late sovereign lord in the said county and on the behalf of our late sovereign lord the said jury were commanded and charged to find the same upon their pity which for fear of the great menaces and threat that were to them given by the said bill disposed persons and for fear of the said late kings displeasure untruly? Endited the said Elizabeth your said oratrice and the others according to the said forged bill against their conscience as the same jury by their oaths upon the holy evangelist made before the master of the ?? of late gave deposed of which felony the said Elizabeth your said oratrice was in nowise guilty as ? almight god for she was not privy nor knew nothing of the concerning of the said Elizabeth Fincham out of the said house for it was done by the said John Stile her late husband by the advice of his said counsel and at the time the said Elizabeth your oratrice was at Coulsdon in Surrey and knew nothing thereof and the said Elizabeth your said oratrice could not be suffered to be at her trial and ? with the said late king concerning the ? ? his high displeasureand they Proving? These great wrongs and ? to them ? done and also seeing divers other persons in likewise by such sinister means wronged and mistreated and also beholding what  end many of them were brought unto durse not ? to the  acquittal of your said oratrice by ? of the Doen? Lavoe? for fear of the said late kings displeasure and also your said oratrice was in such a despond and fear of himself and love of his good and to be utterly budoon? That he was afeared to keep the said Elizabeth his wife in his house with him lest he by his means should be also endited for the keeping of her as it was said to him he should be indited thereof as an accessory of his wife so that Confusion for fear of the ? and in ? of the high displeasure of our said late sovereign lord which he most feared he was ? compelled and forced to make a fine to our said late sovereign lord of five hundred marks of which sum of five hundred marks your said orator hath paid to our late sovereign lord 200 marks and for 300 marks residue he and other sureties to him stand bounde by several recognicences to pay at several days to come In consideration of the promises and that the said Elizabeth was not guilty of the ?misses So that there is no ground nor cause of truth why your said oratours should have been charged to pay one penny for the promises and also that Edmond Dudeley? Which knowing the circumstance? Of the said matter by a bill subscribed by his own hand ready to be shewed sayeth that before god in his conscience the said Elizabeth was wrongfully endited and so he sayeth he hath shewed it to our late sovereign lord and that also the said jury by their depositions have confessed the same as is aforesaid It may therefore please your most honourable lordships and masterships of your blessed disposition and charities ?? for adischarge of the said late kings soul to make unto your said oratours restitution of the said 200 marks by them paid of the good of the said late king and also to cause the said recognisance and any of them to be cancelled and made void for the discharge of your said oratours of the payment of the said 300 marks yet to pay and they shall dayly pray to god for the ? of your most honourable lordships and masterships.

James Yarford of London mercer

And this second plea is joint James and Elizabeth Yarford;

To the King our sovereign lord

In moste piteous wise herewith unto your moste noble grace your humble subject and continual ? James Yerford of London mercer and Elizabeth his wife late the wife of John Stile late of London mercer ? was lawfully seased of the moietie of a tent(tenement) or messuage called Kenthouse in the county of Kent and of the moietie of certain othere lands then by reason of an estate and bargain thereof to him made by John Handley  which helde the same in copy/copeyne? By discent of inheritance ? Elizabeth than wife of Henry Fincham and the other moietie appteyned unto the said Henry Fincham and  Elizabeth in the right of the said Elizabeth his wife which other moietie was lawfully delivered to the said john Stile by …… then Sheriff of the said county by virtue of a writ of delivery upon ‘theytent’ of the said moietie returned and certified in the Chancery upon and by reason of an statute of the staple of Westminster of the sum(some) of £100 (cL) wherein the said Henry Fincham was bounden  to the said John Stile and which £100 the said Henry Fincham would in no wise pay wherefore the said John Stile sued and put the same in execution by due process of the law as before by virtue of which process? The said John Stile was seased and possessed of the said whole tenement or messuage in which messuage the said Henry Fincham at the time of the said execution dwelled in and notwithstanding the said John Stile had then lawfull in?? title and possession of the sand whole tent(tenement)  or messuage the said Elizabeths wife of the said Fincham kept and  held herself ? the same and would in no wise avoid? Nor depart the same but of forwardness and without discretion said she would there abide and dwell who  so ever who soever would say thereunto the contrary yet alle the said demeaner and words of the said Elizabeth notwithstanding the said John Stile his good and charitable mind offered unto her another house of his own for her to dwell in without paying anything therefore which the said Elizabeth utterly refused whereupon the said John Stile by good advice of counsel caused her peaceably to be had one of the same house of Thomas Crispe and Nicholas YHoo his ? and thereupon she ? and cameto her said husband to London and there continued by the space of ? saife and was there delivered of a child and died of the labour of the same child which child is yet alive? and after this the said John Stile by sinister and ? means of certain persons was ? ? that the said Elizabeth should be by him murdered and slain in the said messuage whare? She was conveyed and had ? of the same whereof he was not guilty and afterwards was lawfully acquitted thereof before Thomas Fromwych? And other then justices of Baole Delyny?? In the said county and after died after whose death your said suppliance (yarford and stiles wife) were married together and so it was most gracious sovereign lorde that Edward Guildeforde of the same countie esquire ofpure malice imaginging to hurt and inure? Your said supplicants and to spoil the same James of his goods and  to cause the said  Elizabeth his wife to lose her life at his special labour obtained of ones late sovereigh lord King Henry the VIIth of famous memory your dear father his lines? Patent of commission made to the said Edward Guildeforde, HenryFaane and other of his affinity to enquire of all felonies within? The same county committed and done and certain other articles in the said commission contained and thereupon the said Edward to execute his malicious untrue and sinful purpose he untruly forged and counterfeited a bill by the way of indightment containing in (it) self that the said Elizabeth your said oratrite? And one Henry Comport Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo ? other unknown to the number of the persons the 10th day of the 19th year of the reigh of your said noble father ? ? force of Armes feloniously had entered into the said place called Kenthouse and that the said Comport ? his knee then and there should have given unto the said Elizabeth Fincham then being  with child such a fright  that the same Elizabeth ? one fortnight after should have died of he stroke and that the said Elizabeth your said oratrite and the  other above named were then and there present feloniously comforting and assisting abetting and maintaining the same Henry Comport in the said deed joining whereof of the said Elizabeth your oratrite as ? Almighty God  ? ? gracious sovereign lord the said Edward Guildeforde delivered unto the jury? And on the behalf of your said noble father he commanded and charged them to find but upon? There ? untruly affirming and saying to them that the said bill was defined unto him by the hands of your noble father and that his grace would have so forbidde/followed/found and that they should find it whether they would or no ? diverse other ? words of malice and  threatening by him viscously and furiously to them spoken on your said noble fathers behalf and otherwise whereby the said jury for fear of the said Edward by his unlawful inbracery? And in adjoining? The high displeasure of your said noble father were forced? To find and present? The said bill for their verdict ? your said orator made instance? Labo? Aswell unto the said late noble king your father as to diverse of his council devising to have the law not his graciouise favour or else that the matter must be examined before his most honourable counsel but so was it most gracious sovereign lord that the said Edward Guildeforde so much? Labo? Made against your said orator that no righteous petition of theirs could have spede? And over that the said Edward Guildeforde so threat your said orator that  if the same Elizabeth your orator would proceed to her acquittal your said orators both should fall in the high displeasure and indignation of our late said sovereigh lord and above this that the said Edward Guildeforde would cause the said Elizabeth your said oratrice to stand in the resbertie? Of her life and also the said James was afeared and in despair to keep the said Elizabeth near him in his house lest the said Edward would have caused him to have had trouble therefore because she was indighted of felony and that he should be indighted of felony for keeping of her by reason of which threat and dreadful behaviour of the said Edward Guildeforde and others of his  affinite your said orator were forced  and wasted? To make a fine of ? ? ? your said noble father to gain a pardon of his grace for your said oratos concerning the ? of which sum of (100 marks?) the said James hathe paid to our late sovereign lord your father the sum of (200 marks) and (300 marks) the residue thereof he and other of his ? stand bounden by recognicances to pay to their importunable cost and damage and against all right and good equity for of truth the said Elizabeth Fincham never died of any such stroke nor such stroke had but died of her childbirth wasnot manner of such occasion as divers honest womem which were spent at her traverse wife testify and record. And also of truth neither the said Elizabeth your said oratrice nor the said Henry Comport were not present at such time as it is supposed by the said indightment that the said Elizabeth Fincham should have had the said stroke nor at such time as the same Elizabeth Fincham was in manner aforesaid conveyed? Out of her said house the said Henry Comport  which is supposed to have stricken her was at that  time not near her by 7? Miles and your said oratrice which by the same indightment is supposed to have been present was not near her by miles nor knew not of the ? ? of the said house nor was privy thereunto of which consideration whereof it may like your noble majesty of your most blessed disposition the plaintiffs? tenderly confides to provide by the advise of the lords of your most honourable council that either the said Edward Guildeforde may be compelled to recompense your said oratos as well of the said 200 marks redy paid as of the 300 marks which is yet unpaid or else that your said oratos may be discharged of the said sum of 300 marks yet to pay and also recompensed of the said 200 marks which is paid of the goodes of your said noble father in the discharge of his conscience noble majesty your said oratos during their lives shall daily pray.

The case had been brought by Edward Guildeford who appears to have some issues with the Styles and related to Richard Guildeford who  had been connected with dealings over Sympson's Place. Yarford was Lord Mayor of London in 1519.

 1509/10 – Kent House/Langley; undated documents but in the early years of Henry VIII referring to the late King Henry VII; James Yarford, second husband of Elizabeth Stile and of Elizabeth two submissions regarding accusations of involvement in the case of Elizabeth Fincham late of Kent House. These attempts at transcriptions relate the details of a case brought against John Stile pre 1505 charged with assault against Elizabeth Fincham and regarding repossession of Kent House (see 1501). Elizabeth Fincham was probably reluctant to give up Kent House as she inherited it from her father Stephen Fabyan and her husband Henry Fincham acquired it in marriage to her. We can assume that she is reluctant to accept its loss due to Henry Fincham’s financial affairs, ie being in debt to John Stile. It seems John Stile paid a fine related to the case and Yarford is later attempting to recover the fine or costs pleading the innocence of his wife and stating that Stile had been find not guilty of any assault on Elizabeth Fincham.

Source; Kent Archive U36/L9

Transcript 1; (? Indicates indecipherable words)

 To the King our sovereign lord

In moste piteous wise sheweth unto your moste noble grace your humble subject and continual oratours James Yerford of London mercer and Elizabeth his wife late the wife of John Stile late of London mercer which was lawfully seased of the moietie of a tent(tenement) or messuage called Kenthouse in the county of Kent and of the moietie of certain othere lands then by reason of an estate and bargain thereof to him made by John Handley  which helde the same in copy/copeyne? By discent of inheritance ? Elizabeth than wife of Henry Fincham and the other moietie appteyned unto the said Henry Fincham and  Elizabeth in the right of the said Elizabeth his wife which other moietie was lawfully delivered to the said john Stile by …… then Sheriff of the said county by virtue of a writ of delivery upon ‘thextent’ of the said moietie returned and certified in the Chancery upon and by reason of an statute of the stape of Westminster of the sum(some) of £100 (cL) wherein the said Henry Fincham was bounden  to the said John Stile and which £100 the said Henry Fincham would in no wise pay wherefore the said John Stile sued and put the same in execution by due process of the law as before by virtue of which process? The said John Stile was seased and possessed of the said whole tenement or messuage in which messuage the said Henry Fincham at the time of the said execution dwelled in and notwithstanding the said John Stile had then lawfull intesse title and possession of the sand whole tent(tenement)  or messuage the said Elizabeths wife of the said Fincham kept and  held herself no? the same and would in no wise advoid nor depart the same but of forwardness and without discretion said she would there abide and dwell who  so ever who soever would say thereunto the contrary yet alle the said demeaner and words of the said Elizabeth notwithstanding the said John Stile his good and charitable mind offered unto her another house of his own for her to dewll in without paying anything therefore which the said Elizabeth utterly refused whereupon the said John Stile by good advice of counsel caused her peaceably to be had one of the same house of Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo his servant and thereupon she departed? and cameto her said husband to London and there continued by the space of 12 days saife and was there delivered of a child and died of the labour of the same child which child is yet alive? and after this the said John Stile by sinister and ? means of certain persons was ? ? that the said Elizabeth should be by him murdered and slain in the said messuage whare? She was conveyed and had ? of the same whereof he was not guilty and afterwards was lawfully acquitted thereof before Thomas Fromwych? And other then justices of Baole Delyny?? In the said county and after died after whose death your said suppliance (yarford and stiles wife) were married together and so it was most gracious sovereign lorde that Edward Guildeforde of the same countie esquire ofpure malice imaginging to hurt and inure? Your said supplicants and to spoil the same James of his goods and  to cause the said  Elizabeth his wife to lose her life at his special labour obtained of ones late sovereigh lord King Henry the VIIth of famous memory your dear father his lines? Patent of commission made to the said Edward Guildeforde, HenryFaane and other of his affinity to enquire of all felonies within? The same county committed and done and certain other articles in the said commission contained and thereupon the said Edward to execute his malicious untrue and sinful purpose he untruly forged and counterfeited a bill by the way of indightment containing in (it) self that the said Elizabeth your said oratrite? And one Henry Comport Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo ? other unknown to the number of the persons the 10th day of the 19th year of the reigh of your said noble father ? ? force of Armes feloniously had entered into the said place called Kenthouse and that the said Comport ? his knee then and there should have given unto the said Elizabeth Fincham then being  with child such a fright  that the same Elizabeth ? one fortnight after should have died of he stroke and that the said Elizabeth your said oratrite and the  other above named were then and there present feloniously comforting and assisting abetting and maintaining the same Henry Comport in the said deed joining whereof of the said Elizabeth your oratrite as ? Almighty God  ? ? gracious sovereign lord the said Edward Guildeforde delivered unto the jury? And on the behalf of your said noble father he commanded and charged them to find but upon? There ? untruly affirming and saying to them that the said bill was defined unto him by the hands of your noble father and that his grace would have so forbidde/followed/found and that they should find it whether they would or no ? diverse other ? words of malice and  threatening by him viscously and furiously to them spoken on your said noble fathers behalf and otherwise whereby the said jury for fear of the said Edward by his unlawful inbracery? And in adjoining? The high displeasure of your said noble father were forced? To find and present? The said bill for their verdict ? your said orator made instance? Labo? Aswell unto the said late noble king your father as to diverse of his council devising to have the law not his graciouise favour or else that the matter must be examined before his most honourable counsel but so was it most gracious sovereign lord that the said Edward Guildeforde so much? Labo? Made against your said orator that no righteous petition of theirs could have spede? And over that the said Edward Guildeforde so threat your said orator that  if the same Elizabeth your orator would proceed to her acquittal your said orators both should fall in the high displeasure and indignation of our late said sovereigh lord and above this that the said Edward Guildeforde would cause the said Elizabeth your said oratrice to stand in the resbertie? Of her life and also the said James was afeared and in despair to keep the said Elizabeth near him in his house lest the said Edward would have caused him to have had trouble therefore because she was indighted of felony and that he should be indighted of felony for keeping of her by reason of which threat and dreadful behaviour of the said Edward Guildeforde and others of his  affinite your said orator were forced  and wasted? To make a fine of ? ? ? your said noble father to gain a pardon of his grace for your said oratos concerning the ? of which sum of (100 marks?) the said James hathe paid to our late sovereign lord your father the sum of (200 marks) and (300 marks) the residue thereof he and other of his ? stand bounden by recognicances to pay to their importunable cost and damage and against all right and good equity for of truth the said Elizabeth Fincham never died of any such stroke nor such stroke had but died of her childbirth wasnot manner of such occasion as divers honest womem which were spent at her traverse wife testify and record. And also of truth neither the said Elizabeth your said oratrice nor the said Henry Comport were not present at such time as it is supposed by the said indightment that the said Elizabeth Fincham should have had the said stroke nor at such time as the same Elizabeth Fincham was in manner aforesaid conveyed? Out of her said house the said Henry Comport  which is supposed to have stricken her was at that  time not near her by 7? Miles and your said oratrice which by the same indightment is supposed to have been present was not near her by miles nor knew not of the ? ? of the said house nor was privy thereunto of which consideration whereof it may like your noble majesty of your most blessed disposition the plaintiffs? tenderly confides to provide by the advise of the lords of your most honourable council that either the said Edward Guildeforde may be compelled to recompense your said oratos as well of the said 200 marks redy paid as of the 300 marks which is yet unpaid or else that your said oratos may be discharged of the said sum of 300 marks yet to pay and also recompensed of the said 200 marks which is paid of the goodes of your said noble father in the discharge of his conscience noble majesty your said oratos during their lives shall daily pray.

Transcript 2;

To the right ? ? of our late sovereign lord king Henry the Seventh

In most piteous wise shewith unto your good lordships and ? your humble orators James Yarford of London mercer and Elizabeth his wife late the wife of John Stile late of London mercer that where the late John Stile of late in the said late kings days was put in possession by the Sheriff of kent in a messuage in the said county called Kenthouse in the which Henry Fincham and Elizabeth his wife then dwelled by virtue of an statute of the staple of Westminster of £100 ? the said Henry Fincham was bound to the said John Stile and notwithstanding the said execution and possession thereof made to the said John Stile / yet the said Elizabeth Fincham would in no wise  adboide nor go out of the said house whereupon after by theadvice? Of Thomas ? then servant at the law at Bugard Brok?  the said John Stile sent Henry Comport Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo his servant when the said Elizabeth was at church to the said house and commanded them to keep possession in the same house which so did accordingly and soon after she came again to the same house and brake a pane of a wall at thende? Of the same house and so entered in and after that the same Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo came again and peaceably put the same Elizabeth out of the same house and she seeing she mayye not be suffered there to abide departed there and came to London on foot being with child? And ? a fortnight after she was brought in bed and delivered of a child which is yet in life and the said Elizabeth thereof died as by divers honest women which were at her travail can be reported and proved and after this the said John Stile by sinister means of certain persons was instantly? Conviced of murder and death of the said Elizabeth Fincham and after he was thereof lawfully acquit before Sir Thomas Francis? And other Justices at a session of Gaol ? at Maidstone in the said county and dies after whose death your said aratrice were married together and after the certain malicious persons for to bring them in ? of our said late sovereign lord intentely imagined counterfeted and forged a bill of endightment containing that the said Elizabeth your said oratrice and one Henry Comporte Thomas Crispe and Nicholas Yoo with others unknown the 10th day of May the xyo?th (12th/13th) year of the reign of our late sovereign lord should by force of arms feloniously have entered into the said place called Kenthouse and  that the said Henry Comport with his knee then and there should have given unto the said Elizabeth Fincham then being with child such a stroke that the same Elizabeth Fincham then one fortnight after should have died of the stroke and that the said Elizabeth your said oratrice and the other above named were then and there present feloniously of comforting assisting and maintaining the same Henry in the said deed doing which bill was by the said malicious persons delivered to a jury then being charged for divers other things before certain commissioners of our said late sovereign lord in the said county and on the behalf of our late sovereign lord the said jury were commanded and charged to find the same upon their pity which for fear of the great menaces and threat that were to them given by the said bill disposed persons and for fear of the said late kings displeasure untruly? Endited the said Elizabeth your said oratrice and the others according to the said forged bill against their conscience as the same jury by their oaths upon the holy evangelist made before the master of the ?? of late gave deposed of which felony the said Elizabeth your said oratrice was in nowise guilty as ? almight god for she was not privy nor knew nothing of the concerning of the said Elizabeth Fincham out of the said house for it was done by the said John Stile her late husband by the advice of his said counsel and at the time the said Elizabeth your oratrice was at Coulsdon in Surrey and knew nothing thereof and the said Elizabeth your said oratrice could not be suffered to be at her trial and ? with the said late king concerning the ? ? his high displeasureand they Proving? These great wrongs and ? to them ? done and also seeing divers other persons in likewise by such sinister means wronged and mistreated and also beholding what  end many of them were brought unto durse not ? to the  acquittal of your said oratrice by ? of the Doen? Lavoe? for fear of the said late kings displeasure and also your said oratrice was in such a despond and fear of himself and love of his good and to be utterly budoon? That he was afeared to keep the said Elizabeth his wife in his house with him lest he by his means should be also endited for the keeping of her as it was said to him he should be indited thereof as an accessory of his wife so that

Confusion for fear of the ? and in ? of the high displeasure of our said late sovereign lord which he most feared he was ? compelled and forced to make a fine to our said late sovereign lord of five hundred marks of which sum of five hundred marks your said orator hath paid to our late sovereign lord 200 marks and for 300 marks residue he and other sureties to him stand bounde by several recognicences to pay at several days to come In consideration of the promises and that the said Elizabeth was not guilty of the ?misses So that there is no ground nor cause of truth why your said oratours should have been charged to pay one penny for the promises and also that Edmond Dudeley? Which knowing the circumstance? Of the said matter by a bill subscribed by his own hand ready to be shewed sayeth that before god in his conscience the said Elizabeth was wrongfully endited and so he sayeth he hath shewed it to our late sovereign lord and that also the said jury by their depositions have confessed the same as is aforesaid It may therefore please your most honourable lordships and masterships of your blessed disposition and charities ?? for adischarge of the said late kings soul to make unto your said oratours restitution of the said 200 marks by them paid of the good of the said late king and also to cause the said recognisance and any of them to be cancelled and made void for the discharge of your said oratours of the payment of the said 300 marks yet to pay and they shall dayly pray to god for the ? of your most honourable lordships and masterships.

James Yarford of London mercer

1510 – Foxgrove according to Philipot about the year 1510 Foxgrove came into the family of Beversea through Humphrey Beversea.

 "Foxgrove; John Grene Esquire, and he died possest of it in fourth year of Edward the fourth (1465); and in this Family did the Title reside, untill the Beginning of Henry the eighth (1509), and then it was demised to Beversea, and Humphrey Beversea,"(Philipot)

But the Foot of Fine below for 1511 evidences the lands that constituted those under Burghersh and Bardolf have passed to Vaus. The word Enfeoffment implies Foxgrove is still held under some higher possessor or Danet, Lane etc are enfeoffed to Vaus. The inclusion of Burwash and Plumstead land obscures the amount of land in Foxgrove alone. One might imagine that Danet, Lane and Boywell take on tenancy of each of the properties and we do have Lanes buried in St.Georges in the 16th Century but it is conjecture. Vaus is thought to be another absentee landlord. Philipot and Hasted who derives some information from Philipot have confused some source material having facts in the wrong order according to our researches.

1511 - Foot of Fine: Foxgrove: Sir Nic Vaus & wife Anne (Grene) & Sir Thos Parre & wife Matilda to Gerard Danet, esq, Wm Lane, Geo Boywell. Manors of Burwash & Foxgrove w/300a land, 100a mead, 300a past, 500a wood & 300a waste in Burwash, Plumstead & 'Foxgrove', plus land in 7 other counties. Enfeoffment. (51/358 no. 17)

Gerard Danet etc. are new names to associate with Foxgrove. (source Kent Archaeology)

Nicholas Vaux 1460-1523 (Lord Vaux of Harrowden) married Anne Grene b 1490 daughter of Sir Thomas Grene 1461-1506 and his wife Jane Fogge, Thomas Grene held land in Kent when he died. The names of Vaus and Parre are connected through marriages.

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Dictionary_of_National_Biography,_1885-1900/Vaux,_Nicholas

In 1492 Vaux was among the knights appointed to ride and meet the French ambassadors. Ten years later Vaux became ‘lieutenant’ of Guisnes, three miles inland from Calais (cf. Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 4635). While here an attempt seems to have been made by the Yorkist party to tamper with his fidelity (cf. Gairdner, Letters and Papers of Richard III and Henry VII, i. 231). Henry VII, unlike his successor, was singularly free from uneasy suspicions of the loyalty of his professed friends. Vaux continued when in England to figure at court ceremonies, where his taste for magnificence of dress made him conspicuous (cf. Stow, Annals, p. 484; Grafton, p. 598, cp. p. 600; Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, ii. 4661).

Vaux augmented his ample patrimony by a second marriage with an heiress of extraordinary wealth. His first wife, Elizabeth Fitzhugh, was the widow of Sir William Parr, and the daughter and coheir of Henry, lord Fitzhugh (d. 1472). She died at some time during the reign of Henry VII, leaving three daughters by Vaux. About 1507 Vaux married Anne, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Green, who had died in 1506. This lady and her sister, who married Sir Thomas Parr, inherited lands in Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Buckinghamshire, Yorkshire, Kent, and Nottinghamshire. During her minority an attempt was made by Bishop Foxe, Lord Daubeney, Sir Charles Somerset, and others of Henry VI's court to obtain possession of this vast property for the crown (Baker, Hist. of Northamptonshire, ii. 60; cp. Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 602). This Vaux succeeded in defeating, but both he and Sir Thomas Parr were compelled on 10 July 1507 to enter into indentures for the payment of nine thousand marks (6,000l.) to the king, probably either as a fine for having married, or for license to marry wards of the crown. Of this sum 2,400 marks were paid, and the residue remitted by deed of 26 Oct. 1509, after the accession of Henry VIII (Letters and Papers of Henry VIII, i. 600, cp. 3049).

1512 – Foot of Fine; Kent Arch ref 150. Sir Ric Carew to Jn Oxenbrigge, clk, Thos Fenys Lord Dacre, Sir Thos Fenys, Sir Wm Scot, Sir Godard Oxenbrigge, Sir Jn Scot, Ric Sakevyle & Wm Pelham, esqs. Manor of Maytham w/10a mead in Beckenham, plus 3 large manors in Surrey. £1000. (51/359 no. 18)

Carew has been connected with Simpsons Place which has a small part in Beckenham but the connection is tenuous. The Dacre name turns up occasionally.

1513 - Kent House: Foot of Fine:  Thos Wells & wife Margy to Jn Cowlard, mercer of London, Thos Baldry, Robt Clerkson & Wm Bromwell. Moiety of manor of Kenthouse w/300a land, 20a mead, 100a past & 30a wood in Beckenham & Lewisham; plus land in Battersea, Surrey. 100 mks. (51/360 no. 25) (Kent Arch.)

Moiety denotes a part of Kent House and other records show it was divided at times. This is shortly after John Stile had acquired one moiety from Henry Fincham circa 1500 and presumably Wells and his wife had the other half than the Stiles'. The land in Battersea would be parts of Kent House extending into Penge which lay in the parish of Battersea(Batricksey).

1514 (this section can be checked compared to Hasted although Hasted has been found to be incorrect) Philipot stated; “Beckenham Mannor being annexed to the patrimony of Thomas Tirrell, Humphrey Tirrell his Grandchild to whom it descended, passed away one Moietie of it in the thirty fifth year of Henry the eighth (1514) to Ralph Warren, and the other to Henry Parke;”

But the moiety belonging to Tyrell with mention of sons Hugh and William who leased or enfeoffed their part of Beckenham Manor it later descended through intermarriage from Tyrells to Dalston and Curwen so descriptions showing Warren alienated his Proportion not long after to Bradbury may confirm how Lysons regards the involvement of Warren and Parke as related to mortgages, loans or, more likely, leases? We know that the Tyrells were established in Essex and that their part of Beckenham Manor descended to Dalston and Curwen later in the 17th C. through marriages. Also see 1505 and the lease of William Terell's(Tyrell's) Manor of Beckenham in the occupancy of the Fitz's or their tenants .

1514 Philipot stated “the other Moitie or half of Beckenham Manor by Joan sole Heir of the abovesaid Henry Parke, came to be the Inheritance of Mr. Robert Leigh descended out of Cheshire, whose Successor about the latter End of King James (1620-25) alienated it to Snelgrave.”

But I believe this to be a misunderstanding on Philipot's part although some evidence is scarce and Lysons remarks about probable loans or mortgages. Suffice it to say that from the time of Henry Bruyn's daugthers, Alice and Elizabeth and their multiple marriages. One half of Beckenham Manor descended via the Tyrells to Dalston and Curwen thence to Oliver St. John. The other half descended via Harleston to Leigh and then to Snelgrave who's grandson sold to Walter and Henry St. John via John Evelyn.

1514 - Hilary Term , Court of Common Pleas; Another of many Brograve brushes with the law, they are defendants in this case.

London debt Nykke, Richard, Bishop of Norwich; Belamy, Richard Brograve, John, of Tadlowe, Cams, esq; Brograve, Robert, of Bekynham, Kent, gent

Surrey

trespass: close

Compworth, John

Lye, Edward, of Bekenham, Kent, yeoman; Lye, Robert, of Bekenham, yeoman

Surrey

trespass: close

Compworth, John

Lye, Robert, of Bekenham, Kent, yeoman; Lye, Edward, of Bekenham, yeoman

Surrey

trespass: close

Compworth, John

Lye, Robert, of Bekenham, Kent, yeoman; Lye, Edward, of Bekynham, yeoman

1517 - Lay Subsidy Roll; In the assessment for a lay subsudy in the twentysixth year of Henry VIII (1517), Beckenham appears at £4 8s. And the subsidy is made up as follows: Robert Brograve for his lands xvs (15shillings), Humphrey Style for his lands xxxiiis (33shillings), Edward Alegh for his goods xvs (15 shillings), Henry Vyolett for his goods xvs (15 shillings), Henry King vs (5 shillings), Isabell Dunce for her goods xvs (15 shillings). 

Humphrey Style: Langley, Robert Brograve: Kelsey, Edward Alegh possibly Foxgrove (but not for lands?) (source: R.Borrowman)

The name of Vyolett is curious given Philipot's account of Langley which he states passed from Ralph Langley to John Violett and then to the Styles. Henry Vyolett in this Lay Subsidy is assessed for goods and not land. Foxgrove was supposedly in the hands of Baversea, but it’s another name not mentioned. Did Borrowman overlook any valuation for Beckenham Manor under the Tyrells and Harlestons? or perhaps not recognise their names as being associated with the manor. One writer, John Sheail 1968, observes that a lot of documentation from the Lay Subsidies of the 1500's has been lost. In any case the records in the National Archive have been indexed but not comprehensively transcribed and a database is available indicating where taxation records can be found on various handwritten rolls. Even then the obstacle of deciphering the writing is encountered.

1517 – Beckenham, Bromley, etc.; 9 Henry VIII; Kent Arch. Ref; 329. Ric Hilbyl & wife Eliz to Seth Bothe, Ric Elyot, J of Common Pleas, Wm Horsey, clk, Sir Edm Walsyngham, Jn Fitzjames, Wm Draper, Jn Chancey & Clem Ballard. 1/3 of manor of Sundridge w/200a land, 10a mead, 100a past & 300a wood in Bromley, Chislehurst, Beckenham & Eltham. £100. (11)

 1518 - Kenthouse; Court of Chancery; Short title: Fyncham v Yarford. Litigation
Plaintiffs: Henry Fyncham of London, gentleman, son-in-law of Stephen Fabyan of London, draper.
Defendants: James Yarford of London, knight.
Subject: Half a messuage and land called `Kenthous' in Beckenham and Lewisham, late of the said Stephen.
Kent. (TNA Ref;
C 1/505/41)

2 documents

Stephen Fabyan had died pre 1501 and Sir JamesYarford was the second husband of John Style of Langley’s widow after 1505 in occupancy of this part of Kenthouse and Fyncham was heir of Fabyan by marriage to Elizabeth Fabyan, daughter of Stephen the landlord from as early as 1469? see 1500 and 1503. This relates to Fabyan’s indebtedness to John Style circa 1500-1503 and seemingly Fyncham as Fabyan’s heir is seeking some kind of settlement. Whether the archive could settle the matter remains to be seen. Earlier references and records relate to Fabyan’s perhaps less than opulent assets having been a draper and released from alderman duty due to lack of resources. See 1504 for Fincham’s ‘lack of resources’ relating to a debt of £100 to John Style. Also, John Stile, his wife and some of Stiles servants were indited for assault against Elizabeth Fincham (nee Fabyan) said to result in her death at childbirth, see 1509. Stile was apparently acquitted and his wife and her second husband, James Yarford, appealed for restitution of fines or costs related to the case.

Some curiosity arises from the speculation by Len Hevey that Fabyan may have bought Langley and sold it to Style via Fincham when it seems both Fabyan and Fincham weren’t particularly wealthy.

1519 – Manor of Old Court/ near Langley Farm; Close Rolls Henry VIII: Grants, Ric. Long, King's servant. Lands in Greenwich, the "Queen's lands" in East Greenwich, West Greenwich, Dexforde (sic), Levesham, Kedbroke, Charleton, Wolwyche, Beknam, and Chesselhest, Kent, forfeited by Hen. Norres, and Old Court manor in Greenwich. Undated.

 1519 - Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII; Shipbuilding timbers Henry Kinge of Becknam(sic/Beckenham). Including materials from other properties. See the 1517 Lay Subsidy for mention of King being assessed for the value of his goods. In this reference he is paid for carrying loads which implies he is a carter and the mention of one piece requiring two carts would require a large team of horses or oxen. There are more than a hundred Kings or Kinges in Beckenham burials from 1541 onwards. See also 1501

 “Payments by Thos. Perse.—April 1519, for timber from my lord Marquis, from lord Borgeyny's common called Hadfyld, and Wooddam Park, at 12d. a load. His own labor for 30 days, 20s. Carriage of 8 loads of knees from Danbery Common, belonging to the prior of St. Mary Spytell, to Clement Green, 10s.; from Clement Green to Deptford by water, 13s. 4d. Carpenters' wages, 6d. a day. Loading Cox's great hoye at Clement Green, 5s. 2d. To the parker's wife, for keeping open the gate of Hadfield, 6d. Loading Jas. Clark's hoye, 7s. 8d. Peter Cotiar, carriage of 14 loads timber for trenails, from Bendflyt to Deptford, 14s. 2 hoyes from Battle Bridge to Deptford, 46s. To John Cox, fellmonger, 20 April 1519, 36 loads dry timber, at 5s. 8d. 8 loads trenail wood, at 2s. Freight of 10 loads green timber from Clement Green, Essex, to Deptford Strond, 12d. a load. Lord Borgayny, 20 loads of timber from Andfyld Common, at 20d. Carriage of timber from Tadisfeld (Tatsfield) and Chelsam, to Deptford Strond, by land, 13 miles. at 2d. a mile. To John and Wm. Hobard, for carrying 2 carts of strackeshids and timber to the sawpits, 2 days, 4s. To Herry Kynge, of Becknam, carrying timber from Chelsam, 2s. a load; from Bromley parish, 16d. a load. One piece of the keel from Wekam, requiring 2 carts, 2s. 8d. The other part and the stem piece, 4s. 2 great crooked pieces, being 2 loads, 4s.; 2 loads from Westwood, 2s. 4d.; and half a load bought from him, 12d.”

(source BHO)

 
1522 – Beckenham: Foot of Fine, Kent Arch Ref; 576. Jn Kyng & wife Alice to Jn a Woode, Jn Lambard & Thos Couper. Mess & 5a land in Beckenham. £20. (34)

A small plot but see Woode’s 1525 will where other property in Surrey is mentioned and various bequests and  Lambard is one  of the executors. Woode leaves the Beckenham property to his son Edward. Some names on these transcripts of fines are  witnesses. The  name of Kyng/Kynge/King regularly occurs in Beckenham documents.

1525 - A Will mentioning Beckenham free land and tenements; Woode/Woodd or Wood are recorded in several burials at St.George's from the 16th Century. A Dionise Wood is buried in 1547 and they may be extended family. A Henry Wood is buried in 1553. The will is confusing as ‘John’ is described as the oldest, third and fourth son? An Agnes, daughter of John is also listed. But this is a rare glimpse of intimate family detail.

31 July 1525. John Woode of Saunderstede in Surrey yoman. To be buried in parish church of Alhalowen of Saunderstede. To high awter of parish church of Croydon for tithes etc. 3/4. To the bretherhede of Jesus mase in said church of Croydon 3/4. To parish church of Saunderstede for making my grave and toward the Repacion of the said church 40s. Preest to syng in church of Saunderstede two trentalls for my soule my father and mother and all xtens.
   To every godchildren an eweshepe.
   Unto Denys my wife and John my thirde sonne all my houshold stuffe at Saunderstede. To said Denys 100 wethers and 100 ewes nowe goyng in the parish of Saunderstede.
   I will John my eldest sonne 80 wethers and 20 ewes nowe being at Wodmansturne.
   To John my fourth sonne 100 wethers going at Wodmansturne and two tenements of Custimary holde in Saunderstede accordyng to a surrender by me to the use of him made. To John my yonger sonne 60 wethers at Waddon when he is 20
   To Edward my sonne 100 wethers at Waddon orells ixli when 20.
   To Henry my sonne my lease for terme of yeres of the maner of Waddon in parishe of Croydon.
   To Agnes my doughter 20 ewshepe at Saunderstede and ij heyfers of 2 yeres of age at Norbury all to be delivered at my monethes day.
  To said sonne Henry and John my thirde sonne all my catalls nowe going at Norbury bitwen them except 20 oxen which I will Henry shalhave to be solde for the pfourmaunce of my testament and last will.
   To said John my thirde sonne my leesse of and in the manor of Saundersted except a convenit Chamber for my wife whiche I will my wife enjoye for her lyfe and ease of fyre in the hall and kechyn of the said manour. I will John my younger sonne shalhave my messuages, lands and tenements in Cullesdon in Surrey which I holde to ferme by Covent Seall of the Abbot and Covent of Chertesey for terme of ? payng over and above the Rent to said Abbot, 40s to the said Denys my wife duryng hir lyfe.
   Residue to Henry my sonne which Henry, John Lambard of Wodmansturne and John Ownshed of Farley I make extours and Nicholas Lye gentilman overseer.
   To John Scott Esquer and John Skynner gent for to be good to my said wife and childern in their causes 20s.
   Witnesses Edward Presland, Richd Bray, John Wodstok thelder, Thos Owsted and John Wodstok the yonger.
   Last will of all my free londes and tenements in the parishe of Beknam in Kent all which I woll Edward Wode my sonne shalhave to him and his heires.
   Probate (St Pauls) v Sept 1525 by exors named.

1525 – Beckenham unidentified land; Foot of Fine; Kent Arch. Ref 692. Jn & Thos Caweston (sons of Thos C) & Jn & Thos Caweston (sons of Hen C) to Hen Kyng, Ralf Bourne & Jn Kempsall. 2 mess, 32a land, 2a mead & 2a wood in Beckenham. 80 mks. (33)

Another mention of the Kyng family and some Cawstons appear in Beckenham burials, mostly for wives and children from 1562 to 1633. Possible the males of the family are buried in Bromley or Surrey? This fine evidences another yeoman held  smallholding?

1526 – Death of Sir James Yarford second husband of Elizabeth Style, widow of John Style d.1505 of Langley and City of London

From Stow’s Survey of London, Church of St. Michael Bassinghall memorials.  

 
1527 - Foxgrove : John Grene Esquire, and he died possest of it in fourth year of Edward the fourth (1465); and in this Family did the Title reside, untill the Beginning of Henry the eighth (1509), and then it was demised to Beversea, and Humphrey Beversea, I find held it in the eighteenth year of Henry the eighth (1527), and his Descendant passed it away to Luke Hollingworth,(Philipot)

This assessment by Philipot has to be reviewed. Although Beversea may have “held it” it must have been “held of” a member of the Vaus/Vaux family as Foxgrove is part of property mentioned in 1535 as part of a marriage settlement by Sir Thomas Vaux.

1527 - Unknown property Beknam; Letters and papers, foreign and domestic, Henry VIII. Sir Wm. Compton, under-treasurer of the Exchequer. Grant of three tenements near the dock at Byllyngysgate, Greenwich, Kent, and lands in Estgrenewich, Westgrenewich, Depford, Leuesham, Kedbroke, Charleton, Wolwich, Beknam and Chesseleste, and the neighborhood. Del. Westm.,—18 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. 18 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 29. (BHO and see 1529)

1528 - Court of Common Pleas; cases mentioning Beckenham and various people; 


Henry VIII, 1528: CP40no1057

Norfolk, debt; Feltwell, Richard v. Abbotte, John, of Lewesham, Kent, butcher; Kyng, John, of Lewesham, miller; Kempsale, John, of Bokenham, Kent, yeoman; Bartelett, John, of Crowden, Surrey, smith; Gysborowe, George, of Parva Walsyngham, yeoman

Kent, debt;  Guldeford, George, esq, sheriff of Kent v.Kempsall, Thomas, of Bekenham, yeoman, administrator of; (Kempsall, John, of Bekenham, yeoman)

Kent, Trespass; close Brograve, Robert, esq. Sterky, John, of Levesham, yeoman

1529 - Old Court Manor; May; Morden College property and Langley Farm? As part of; Unknown property, see 1527. Coincidentally, Humphrey Style of Langley was appointed Squire of the Body to Henry VIII and acquired a coat of arms to distinguish his branch of the Styles from other branches. (The other branch possibly included John Style who was ambassador for Henry VII and VIII?)

Henry Norres, squire for the Body. Grant of three tenements in "le Westend," Grenewiche, Kent, near the dock at Billyngysgate in Grenewiche, land in Grenewiche Marshe, called Bendysh, in Eltham, Charlton, Wolwich, and elsewhere, and lands called the Queen's lands, in East and West Grenewiche, Deptford, Lovesham, Kedbroke, Charlton, Wolwiche, Beknam and Cheflest (Chiselhurst ?) Kent. The premises were held by Sir Wm. Compton till his death, 29 June last. Del. Westm., 1 May 21 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 26. (BHO)

 

1529 - C 1/692/32Short title: Wood v Style.

Plaintiffs: William Wood and Johane, his wife, and Rose Bordell, widow, daughters of John Brongar.

Defendants: Humphrey, son and heir of John Style, citizen and mercer of London.

Subject: Detention of deeds relating to a messuage, orchard, gardens and land in Addington, which complainants claim upon the death of their father and of Henry, his son and heir.

Surrey. 2 documents1529-1532 TNA

 

Style coat of arms viz. Sable, a fess engrailed between three fleurs de lis, within a bordure or, the fess fretted of the field.

This property dispute has been used to evidence that John Style (Stile) lived til 1529 but the short description only mentions Humphrey as son and heir and  John Style died in 1505 evidenced by his will.

1529 – Langley, Red Lodge; This panelling was recovered from the Red Lodge which was near Wickham Green on the edge of Langley Park. It is said to have been installed at the instigation of John Style (d.1505) an Alderman of London, the first of the Style family to occupy Langley. The inference is perhaps that Red Lodge was the first residence and the Langley House or Place postdated it. Documents at the Philadelphia Museum of Art have linked it to a John Style who was ambassador to Spain for Henry VII and Henry VIII but we think we can discount that even though ‘Ambassador Style’ may have been related to John Style of Langley. See 1505. Humphrey Style acquires his coat of arms in 1529 which is a more likely reason for the date on the panelling.

 

The Philadelphia Museum of Art description is “The paneling in this room comes from an upstairs corner room in Red Lodge, a small structure that in the sixteenth century was part of the Langley Park estate, along with a number of other buildings and a large deer park. Bearing the date 1529, the paneling was probably ordered by Sir John Style, a London alderman, whose son, Humphrey Style, became the sheriff of Kent.

This paneling is one of the earliest dated examples with "Romayne" heads, so-called because they were inspired by profiles in the ancient Roman style that were found in sixteenth-century European prints. The paneling also features early-sixteenth-century-style heads that may have been intended as portraits. The rose, feathers, and pomegranate are the emblems of, respectively, the royal house of Tudor, the Prince of Wales, and Catherine of Aragon, first wife of Henry VIII. Such heraldic references were common in paneling. Other popular decorative motifs that appear in the paneling include vases, leaves, and dolphins.

The stone fireplace is of the period but not original to the room, while the window is modern but recalls a common Tudor type. In large houses such windows often incorporated colored glass badges like the sixteenth-century coats of arms installed here.”

 

However, John Style died in 1505 so probably Humphrey Style commissioned it when he was awarded his coat of arms in 1529 whichis probably the date at which he is knighted and the date carved on the panelling. Humphrey’s position as Esquire of the Body to Henry VIII puts him close to the king and he would have a need for a suitably high status building. His father in law was Thomas Baldry(Bauldry) who was one time Lord Mayor of London alongside Humphrey’s father who was a London Alderman bringing Humphrey and Bridget Baldry into contact and perhaps an arranged match. Baldry was also the executor of John Style’s will of 1505.

The connection with Henry VIII could also connect with the story concerning Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk and Anne of Cleves, see 1545.

https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/43776.html

   

1529/32 – Beckenham Manor TNA Ref. C 1/680/50 Short title: Tyrell v Luson. Plaintiffs: Humphrey Tyrell, esquire. Defendants: Nicholas Luson and Robert Legh.... Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Early Pleadings and Proceedings, Richard II to Philip and Mary. Detailed description at item level. Short title: Tyrell v Luson. Plaintiffs: Humphrey Tyrell, esquire. Defendants: Nicholas Luson and Robert Legh. Subject: Detention of deeds relating to the manor of Beckenham, whereof the parties are tenants in common.

1529 – Penge; Surrey Wills ref; SW/3_24
John Comport of Penge, Battersea, husbandman 28 Apr 1529 (to be buried in the churchyard of Beckenham, Kent; to high altar of Beckenham 3s 4d; to mother church 4d)
to my younger son John Comport two oxen for certain money I owe him; to my daughter Jane [? Jane Comport] a year old cow bullock; to my daughter Emma [? Emma Comport] a year old cow bullock; to my elder son John Comport a heifer with calf; residue to wife Catherine Comport, exec.
Overseers: Harry Vyolett of Beckenham
Witnesses: Lawrence Kynder, priest; Henry Violet; Robert Hamond; John Topsfyld; John Tanner
Proved: 30 Jul 1529 at St Olave Southwark to exec. [DW/PA/7/3 ff.107r-v]

Another example of Penge residents using Beckenham Church as a place of worship. This tenant farmer leaves some bequests and the Vyolett/Violet family feature in the history of Beckenham several times with burials in the St. George’s register. 1529 is too early for John to appear in the register but an Elizabeth Comporte appears 1557, perhaps a wife or daughter of John the younger son?

1530 - Beckenham Manor (one moiety) Letters and Papers foreign and domestic, Henry VIII 1531/32; Clement Harleston, of Coksale, Essex. Licence to alienate his moiety or purparty of the manor of Bekenham, Kent, and his messuages, &c. in Bekenham, to Robert Legh, Roger Starkey, Mathew Haddes, John Preston, William Lamberd, Robert Meredith, and Richard Malery, citizens and mercers, London; to the use of the said Robert, his heirs and assigns for ever. Westm., 29 March. Pat. 22 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m 14. (BHO)

Just prior to this it seems Harleston was pursuing a Nicholas Leveson about deeds for Beckenham Manor and other properties and Humphrey and William Tyrell as owners of the other moiety of the Manor were called as witnesses. All part of the complexity of the split manor and several husbands of Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn

This is the record that Philipot, Hasted and Lysons had said "Manor of Beckenham: Clement Harleston sold it, in 1530, to Robert Legh, Esq., whose descendant of the same name, in 1610, alienated it to Henry Snelgar, or Snelgrave, Esq.  Lysons account differs in some respects to Hasted probably due to some vaguaries regardng the Bruyns, Tyrells and Dalstons. Even now we have reason to correct same aspects, namely the indication that earlier Maude de la Rokele brought the manor over to the Bruyns rather than Isolda whose family name is unknown. See next entry 1531. We find Robert Leighe(sic) the elder in Beckenham burial records for December 1567 and Robert Leigh (gentleman) burial in 1630. Confusion is possible with Leighs as the Leigh family of Addington and Foxgrove are apparently unconnected with Robert Leigh.

1530 – Foot of Fine; Various smallholdings? Kent Arch. Ref988. Jn Fitz to Hen Kyng, clothworker of London & Nic Smale. 3 mess, 60a land & 3a marsh in Greenwich, Charlton, Beckenham & Lewisham. £100. (37)

Kyng’s name appears regularly.

1531 – Beckenham Manor; Completion(Final Accord)? of the Transfer of the moiety from Harleston to Robert Legh. A foot of fine referenced by Kent Archaeology; Clem(ent) Harleston, esq & wife Margt to Robt Legh, Rog Starky, Matt Haddes, Jn Preston, Wm Lamberde, Robt Meredyth & Ric Malary. Moiety of manor of Beckenham w/500a land, 200a mead, 500a past & 500a wood in Beckenham. £300. (1700 acres?)

This raises some questions about the extent of the manor as a subsequent foot of fine regarding the other moiety of Beckenham Manor under the Tyrells is described as the same acreages. "Hum Tyrrell, esq & wife Joan to Guy Crafford of London, esq. Moiety of manor of Beckenham w/500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood & 500a waste in Beckenham. Enfeoffment." (2200 acres?) although it adds 'waste' which is perhaps Penge Common. However, the two moieties were equal in size on the 1623 map drawn for Dalston and Snelgrave which describes a total of 936 acres.
As the manor of Beckenham was divided between the two Bruyn sisters somewhat earlier one assumes other land in Essex and Hampshire was also divided and maybe added to the ‘Beckenham’ acreages. This would require further research. But the 3900 acres total of the two moieties is equivalent to roughly the 3755 acres shown in the 1838 Tithe for the whole of Beckenham which is a curious coincidence. The release from Humphrey Tyrell to Guy Crafford is not recorded in any other histories but appears to be another lease before the Dalston’s acquire the moiety.

 

1623 Beckenham Manor map describing acreages

 

1531 - Beckenham, Penge etc.; This will describes property and possibly links with some lands called Redons and similar such as the current Reddons Road. (source; Kent Archaeology). Rydon describes himself as a yeoman which is a landowning commoner. Whether his name gives rise to Redens Wood is an assumption. If correct his Beckenham farm could be between Thayers Farm and Kent House Farm. He refers to a lease or covenant from ‘my Lord Abbott’ and some fields are called Lords Acre or Lords in this viscinity. Rydon’s main property was in Battersea which at this time included the hamlet of Penge. We cannot identify all his property but land in Lewisham is also mentioned. This Henry Rydon describes Henry King as his uncle and Robert Kyng as his cousin. His son Henry leaves a will in 1568 the Joanne/Johanne the daughter of that Henry Rydon marries Oliver St. John of Battersea which links the Rydons to the St.Johns. We have some outstanding questions as to whether Rydon property became absorbed into the St.John Battersea and Beckenham estates but it is other St.Johns who purchase Beckenham Manor circa 1650. The Beckenham Manor map of 1623 shows the fields with Redons in the name. Maybe just a coincidence?

 Henry Rydon - Will 10 Dec 1531,
10 Dec 1531. Henry Rydon of Battersey in Surre yoman. To be buried within the parisshe churche of Battersey as nighe unto Joanne late my wyfe as may be. To the Roodelight 3/4, Our Lady lyht in the high chauncell there 3/4. To owr ladye lighte in Sainte Nicolas Chauncell there 3/4. To the mayntence of Sainte Katherines light Vs. To eche of the ploughe light and Sainte Xtofer lighte 20d, toSaint George light 12d. At buryng 15 preests and 4 new torches and to be geven ij to Battersey (Battersea) on to Waunesworth (Wandsworth), to the paroche churche of Claphan an other. Months mind with 15 preests at dirige and masse for me and Joane late my wyfe and breade ale and chese at the saide churche thereto be dalte to every personne that will take yt. Obytt within the churche of Battersey for my soule etc. A coope of velvet broderid to the valew of £6.13.4. to the churche of Battersey and the saide cope to have in the mydds of the backe a scripture broderid in these words following:
   Pray for the sowle of Henry Rydon and Joane his wyfe oon whoo soules God have mercye.
   To Margerye my wyfe in goods etc £100.
   To Robert my sonne my leas or Covent seale with the yeres conteyned in the same I hold and have of my Lorde Abbott priour and covent of Westmynster of the manor or lordeshippe of Battersey for terme yeres and if he die or he come to 21 yeres then to Henry my sonne at 21. I will my cosyn Robert Kyng of Beckenham in Kent, yoman shall occupie my said ferme yf he be dispoased to the use of the said Robert my sonne putting in sufficent surtes to be bounden to Nicolas? Harris and Elizabeth his wyfe my doughter.
   My wyfe Margerye to have an honest Chamber for her and a mayden within the said ferme by the space of oon hole yere after my decease. I will the £100 to Margery my wyfe shall stand and be to her in and for full satisfacon of all suche goods or stuff whiche were sold by me to Thomas Kyrry of London ?salfe parcell of the muentarye of the goods of Thos Otley whils he levid of London, Grocer her late husband.
   To Elizabeth Harrys my doughter a gold ryng, a littl gilt pott, etc. To Nicolas Harrys my gowne coloroid browne tawny.
   To Robert my sonmne bothe my best livereys gownes. To my uncle Henry King my gowne colorid medley furred with blacke lambe. Among the servunts of the now Abbott of the monasterye of Westmynster 6/8. To and among the servunts of the monke Bayly there 3/4 and of the priour 3/4. To Henry Rydon thelder 6/8, a maare with her foole, ij steryes and a yong heyfer. To Richd King my servunt 6/8, my baye maare with her fole, a cow, bullock, etc. To John Nichell my servunt 6/8, a gray ambling maare, etc. To John Harmon my servunt 6/8, a trotting bay nagg etc. To Thos King my gowne colorid medley. To John Lysteney my sheppard 6/8.
Residew to Robert and Henry my sonnes when 21. If both die then to Nicolas Harrys and Elizabeth his wyfe, my doughter.
    I make Nicolas Harris and Robert Kyng extours. Wit. Sir Wm Bayly curate of the said churche of Battersey, Richd Holte, Thurstone Asheley, Rauf Hunter and John Hulson.
    This is: of all my lands etc. in Battersey in Surrey and in Westerham, Bromeley, Beckenham and Lewisham in Kent. I will Margerye my wife have one annyte of £5 yerely owte of all my londs etc. that is 50s owte of my lands in Battersey and Wannesworth and other 50s owte of my lands in Westerham, Bromeley, Beckenham and Lewisham for her lyfe.
   I will that Robert Ryden my sonne when 21 all my lands as well free as customary in Battersey and Wannesworth in Surrey. I will also that Henry Rydon my sonne when 21 shalhave all my lands, tenements, etc. in Westerham, Bromeley, Beckenham and Lewisham for ever.
    I will my cosyn Robert King of Bekenham, yoman shalhave the Rule and governance and letting etc of all the saide lands willed to the said Robert durying all the noneage of the same Robert.
   I will that Nicolas Harrys my sonne in law shall have the Rule etc. of the lands etc. appoynted to Henry my sonne during his noneage [in each case to pay the 50s to Margery my wife and 20s for the use etc. of the son].
   Probate 4 Jan 1531.

See 1568

Son Henry will 1568 Will mentions land in Beckenham (Penge Common) to go to the use of wife Elizabeth if unmarried after her death to Johan Harte otherwise Rydon my base daughter & her issue or if dead to Thomas Harrys son of the late Nicholas Harrys

Also Bridge Court Manor in Battersea lease to Thomas Kempsall of 21yrs @ ú10pa from Michaelmas grounds meadows & pastures called Latezette Webenste Upperbackfield Netherbackfield, Podes Grove, Little Rock, Great Rock, Rock Orchard, Chame Heng, in Beckenham  (Henry Kemsall son of Thomas & his wife is a godson) Margery Woodward wife of Nicholas Woodward of London fishmonger decd late wife of Henry Rydon my father

cousin Elizabeth Rydon wife of William Rydon of Pyrford

brother in law Richard Turke 

Daughter married Sir Thomas Holcroft who dies in 1591 leaving 2 sons, Joan/Johanna remarries Sir Oliver St. John, Viscount Grandison. Oliver sues Edmund(Edward) Style circa 1590 over land in the manor of Battersea. Joan outlives Oliver by a matter of months and her will is executed by her surviving son Sir Henry Holcroft M.P.  but I find nothing more unless there is a link between Viscountess Grandison and the Countess of Oxford reference later.

 Reference: TNA ref; E 133/3/464B

Description:

Elizabeth Rydon, widow, queen's farmer, v. Hugh Goldwell and others. Wood felled in a certain piece of waste ground lying at the north-west end of Gravell Hill Coppys, by Henry Rydon, and carried to the manor house of Croydon, by order of Matthew Parker,archbishop of Canterbury. Bounds between the parishes of Croydon and Battersea. Alleging that the parishioners of Croydon, while perambulating their bounds, were stopped from entering the coppice by Thomas Kempsall. Beds & Surrey.

 Date: 20 Eliz. Easter

Thomas Kempsall left a will in 1599 & the following in Chancery

 Will 1599 leaves lands etc to sons Henry & Jeremy equally

Jeremy held land at Pickhurst in Hayes (probably by marriage) Description:Kempsall family; Hayes - Solemead and Horleys (5 acres) at Pickhurst deed of 1554 has notary's mark Held At:Kent History and Library CentreDocument Order #:U36/T178Date:1544-1728

 And that led me to this and I think the messuages correlate to the listed owners. Certainly Baldwin was referred to of as the Abbeye which I think we had determined to be St Peters.

 

Redons and Lords fields. As they are named fields on the Beckenham Manor map of 1623 it indicates they belong to the manor, maybe ownership changed.

1533 – Langley: Short title: Dawe v Style. Plaintiffs: John, son of Richard Dawe, deceased. Defendants: Humphrey Style.... Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Early Pleadings and Proceedings, Richard II to Philip and Mary. Chancery pleadings addressed to Sir Thomas Audley as Lord. Dawe v Style. Plaintiffs: John, son of Richard Dawe, deceased. Defendants: Humphrey Style. Subject: Mortgage of a messuage in Beckenham. Kent.

The National Archives, Kew - Chancery, the Wardrobe, Royal Household, Exchequer and various commissions

As John Dawe is plaintif it sounds like he is seeking some settlement or payment from Humphrey Style of Langley. We cant say whether the Dawes have lent money to Style or sold property against a mortgage. The Dawes have some social standing locally being mentioned in wills and post mortem inquisitions.

1533 – 1558; John Dawe ye elder d.1558 is recorded in Beckenham burials. A possible Jhon Dawe but transcribed as Davye was buried in 1541 and could be the 'younger' son. Also a few other Dawe burial records and  references in the 14th Century evidencing some property ownership or ‘husbondman’ presence in  Beckenham. A  reminder that burial records only began in 1539. Burial records with possible spelling variations and transcription errors. We can see that  the family appear to have  left  the area by 1571?

4 Aug 1541 1541 DAVYE Isarde 1541
7 Jun 1541 1541 DAVYE Jhoane 1541
15 Aug 1541 1541 DAVYE Jhon 1541
12 Jan 1553 1553 DAWE Humphrye 1553
5 Jul 1554 1554 DAWE William s of William 1554
21 Oct 1556 1556 DAWES Margaret w of Jhon 1556
22 Jun 1557 1557 DAWE William 1557
20 Jun 1558 1558 DAWE Jhon (ye elder) 1558
24 Jan 1560 1560 DAWES Henry 1560
20 May 1561 1561 DAWYS(inserted twice) Nicolas s of Wm 1561
23 May 1571 1571 DAVYES Richarde 1571
3 Aug 1878 1878 DAWES Francis Arthur Beckenham 2 1876


1534 – Foxgrove; This indenture explains that Thomas Vaus and his wife will have the lands for life. We should look to the date of their deaths to determine the next phase of Foxgrove’s ownership.  There are problems in determining the process from Nicholas Vaus to Hollingworth as described by Philipot who has confused matters here.

Date 12 December. Indenture of Agreement. (1) Thomas Vaus, Lord Harowdon son and heir of Nicholas Vaus kt., late Lord Harowdon, and of Lady Anne, his wife, dec., and (2) William Parr esq., son and heir of Sir Thomas Parr kt., and of Dame Maud, his wife, now dec. Sir Thomas Grene kt. was seised of manors of Norton Dany, Hethyncote, Darlescote, Sewell, Wyttylbury, Pootcote, Grymescote, Coldehigham, Duncote, Burcote, Bruden, Blakesley, Pokesley, otherwise Pokelardla ley, Pallesbury, Crasewell, Sylleston, Bukton, otherwise Boughton, Pysford, Brampton Magna, Brampton Parva, Dodyngton, Houghton Magna, Houghton Parva, Northampton, Assheby, Mares, Battesady, Hardwyke, Eylesbarton, Harrowdon Parva, Pyghtesley, Isham, Myddelton, Flore, Haybarne Felde, Borowghasshe, Foxegrove, Lynley and the hundred of Norton, and of the office of keeping the forest of Whyttelwood etc., cos. Northants., Bucks., Kent, and Hertf. Also of the manor of Kegworthe and Claxton, with lands in Kegworth, Claxton, Sutton, Donyngton, Kynston, Rytolf, Maltby, Thedylthorpe, Mabylthorp, Beysby, Helpryngham Parva, Gayton, Hole, Viceby, Carleton, Hotoft, Markeby, Waynefflete, Hekyngton, Strubby, Folkyngham, Strangrave, Hunington, Nesse, Muscote, Westnesse, West Nuningyngton, Rytolf and Coleton, etc. co. Leics., Notts., Lincs., and Yorks. After Grene's death premises came to Anne and Maud, as daughters and heirs. Anne married Nicholas, late Lord Harowdon, and Maud, Sir Thomas Parr, and seised except of keeping of forest of Whyttelwood. By indenture (1) Nicholas Vaus kt., Lord Harowdon, and Lady Anne, his wife, and (2) Sir Thomas Parr and Dame Maud, his wife, 26 February 3 Henry VIII, and by fine (1) Nicholas, Lord Harowdon, and Lady Anne, his wife, Sir Thomas Parr and Dame Maud, his wife, and (2) Gerrard Danett esq., William Lane and George Boybyll gent and to heirs of Gerrard. Harowdon and wife to enjoy for life manors etc. in cos. Northants, Bucks., Kent, and Hertf., except keeping of forest of Whyttelwood; Parr and wife, manors etc. in cos. Leics., Notts., Lincs. and Yorks. The Harowdon part came to Thomas Vaus, Lord Harowdon, the Parr part to William Parr. Ratification of partition. seal. Signature : William Parr. (TNA ref E 328/63)

1535 - Foxgrove; An Act concerning the assurance of certain lands to the Lady Elizabeth Vaux in recompence of her jointure. Nicholas Vaux’s eldest son Thomas marries Elizabeth Cheyny and the document assures that Foxgrove among the other properties will pass to the heir William Vaux.

Where before this time Syr Thomas Vaux Knyght Lorde Harrowdon, in consideracion of marriage had betwene hym and the Lady Elizabeth Nowe his Wife Doughter and Heire to Sir Thomas Cheyny Knyght deceased, laufully assured unto the seid Lady Elizabeth for time of ther lyfe amongst others the Manour of Grene Norton in the Countie aforesaid... including Foxgrove, Kent

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=B7o4AQAAMAAJ&lpg=PA580&dq=vaux%20foxgrove&pg=PA579#v=onepage&q=vaux%20foxgrove&f=false

See next page for Foxgrove’s mention.

 

1535 - John Dun's Will; Several interesting elements, perhaps the mention of the Brotherhood of St. George may be the first time the church is identified with St. George? Henry Vyolett would be a descendent of the Henry Violet dying in 1505 and the description of him as ‘overseer’ rather than as a property owner is of interest. Elys Bodley’s will is copied here and the other names and occupations add some substance to inhabitants of the village. The probate in October 1535, will date Dec 1534 and ‘syke in bodye’ describe his failing health.

John Duns, gentilman of the parishe of Bekenham in Dio Rochestre in Kent, syke in bodye, etc. To be buried in the parishe church of Bekenham. To high awter for tithes etc. 3/4. To the brotherhed of Saint George in the same churche 6/8. For my sepulture in the same churche 6/8.
   Rest to Elizabeth Duns my wife whom I make sool extrix and Henry Vyolett of the same parishe overseer. In the persons of Maister Elys Bodley Doctir and person of the same Church, Sir Thos Capulwode parishe prest there, Hugh Corke Parishe clerk, Cornelyus Tomson taillour of the same parishe and other moo. 5 Dec 1534 the yere of our soverayn Lord King Henry the Eight 26.
   Probate 20 Oct 1535 apud London Coram Dno aucti Dni ‘nri’ Regis ac in terris eccl. Anglicane sub ?xten capitis supremi – By Elizth relict.

Such Wills evidence occupants of the parish and in some cases their property, neighbours and relations.

1536-1541 Dissolution of the Monastries under Henry VIII; 

1537 – Foot of Fine; Kent Arch. Ref 1448. Ralf Hamond to Robt Hamond. 2 mess, 20a land, 14a mead & 16a past in Beckenham; land in Surrey. £100. (52/373 no. 18)

1538 – Langley Farm? As part of Old Court Manor; Unidentified property but it is mentioned int other entries, a search for place names can be used to cross reference; Letters and papers, foreign and domestic Henry VIII; see 1527 and 1529; Ric. Long, King's servant. Lands in Greenwich, the "Queen's lands" in East Greenwich, West Greenwich, Dexforde (sic), Levesham, Kedbroke, Charleton, Wolwyche, Beknam, and Chesselhest, Kent, forfeited by Hen. Norres, and Old Court manor in Greenwich. Undated. (BHO)

 1538 – Humphrey Style; TNA ref; C 1/951/49 Short title: Brown v Style.
Plaintiffs: John BROWN, gentleman.
Defendants: Humphrey STYLE, esquire, son-in-law of Elizabeth, late the wife of Thomas Bawdry, knight, alderman of London.
Subject: Share of the said Sir Thomas's fortune of 7713l. 2s. promised to complainant on marriage with Alice his daughter. London1538-1544

Style’s father in law Thomas Baldry died in 1534 leaving shares of his estate to his children upon their marriage. It seems only one daughter Thomasin was married at the time of his death thereby receiving her share. Apparently the daughter Alice married shortly afterwards but Style and his mother in law had not paid her share of Baldry’s (Bawdry) estate amounting to £7713.2s.0p.  It looks like the daughters may have married brothers Thomas and John Browne.


1538 – 54; George Forman,  citizen and skinner of London, and Agnes his wife, great-granddaughter and heir of John  Hever v. Richard Carell (Carew?). Messuage and land in Hayes, West Wickham, Beckenham and Bromley, Kent

1540 –1545 - From Hasted’s history of Kent and quoting Thomas Philipott in Villare Cantianum recorded that “Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, son of Elizabeth Bruyn, by her second husband, resided in the manor-house of Beckenham as lessee; and that he entertained Henry VIII there, "and here entertained Henry the eighth, with all the Cunning Pompe of Magnificence, as he went to bestow a Visit at Hever, on his discarded, and repudiated wife Ann of Cleve."

This reference has been repeated since its first appearance in Philipot. Sometimes confusing Anne of Cleves with Anne Boleyn. Henry married Anne of Cleves in 1540 and he died in 1547 but Brandon died in 1545 so if true it must have been within this 1540/45 five year window. For clarity this is the old manor house opposite St. George’s Church and not what we refer to as the Mansion in Beckenham Place.  No other independent confirmation of the story has been discovered.

Hever had been the home of the Boleyne’s but after Henry VIII had Ann Boleyn or Bullen and her brother executed he confiscated Hever and subsequently rented it to his fourth and ex-wife Anne of Cleve. In my understanding local folklore sometimes referred to Henry VIII staying in Beckenham on his way to see Anne Boleyne but maybe I misunderstood it. Philipott’s version is the earliest we have rediscovered at this time which describes Beckenham in any detail.

Another local connection with Henry VIII is via Humphrey Style of Langley Park who was Esquire of the Body to Henry, see 1529. It is perhaps as likely or more likely that Langley was the place where Henry visited as Beckenham Manor was divided between the Tyrells and Heveningham around this time.

Philipott writes of Hever: “Hever in the Hundreds of Somerden and Ruxley, had in elder Times a Castle, which was the Capital Seat or Mannor built by Thomas de Hever, who had liberty by the Charter of Edward the third, granted to him in the fourth of his Raign, not only to embattle his Mansion here, but likewise had Free-warren annexed to his Lands in this place. William Hever deceased without Issue Male, and left only two Daughters and Co-heirs; Joane married to Reginald Cobham of Sterborough, and the other wedded to Brocas, whence in Records it is sometimes called Hever Cobham and Hever Brocas, and when the Cobhams went out, the Bullens were the immediate Purchasers; for Geffrey Bullen purchased this Place, and his Grand-child Sir Thomas Bullen Knight of the Garter, and Earl of Wilts, lived here, who was Father to Anne Bullen, Wife to Henry the eighth; and as he had here his Habitation, so likewise he has here his Sepulcher, and lieth emtombed in Hever-church; but when his Son George Viscount Rochford, upon pretence of some black Crimes acted against the Majesty of Henry the eighth, fell under the Censure of High Treason; this upon his Attainder or Conviction was escheated to the Crown, and began to be reputed a Mansion of some Estimate, when Anne of Cleve for some Time lived here, and made it her residence; but, in Times subsequent to this, I find it eminent for nothing, till King James granted it to Sir Edward Waldgrave, whose Successor yet possesses it.”

This just needs a bit of clarification but of no impact on our history of Beckenham. However, maybe it’s an example of how information becomes distorted, confusing the two Anne’s associated with Henry VIII and Hever. Hevercastle.co.uk states: In 1540 Henry VIII married his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves. Henry’s decision to marry Anne was based on a portrait miniature painted by Hans Holbein. The marriage was made for political reasons but ended in divorce six months later. Henry VIII awarded her the honorary title of ‘The King’s Sister’, £500 a year, a sufficient household and two houses. In addition, he allowed her to lease a number of manors to enhance her status and income, including Hever, at an annual rent of £9-13s-3½d. Anne settled happily in England and became good friends of the King and Anne Boleyn’s daughter, the future Queen Elizabeth I.

Anne of Cleves had Hever Castle until her death in 1557 but it is not known how much time she spent at the Castle. However, there is a surviving letter written by Anne to Mary Tudor in 1554 signed ‘from my poore house of Hever’.

Henry VIII took Hever from the Boleyne’s or Bullens as Anne Boleyne had been accused of adultery with her brother etc.

1541 - Kelsey:  Foot of Fine: Robt Brogreve, esq & Margt Parker, wid. to Robt Chidley & Robt Hamond. Manor of Kelsellys w/3a mead, 155a past & 160a wood in Beckenham. Enfeoffment. (40) (Trinity) (Kent Arch.)

Acknowledges a lease as the land remains Brograve. Enfeoffment implies in return for a service.

1541 - Beckenham Manor Tyrell moiety: Foot of Fine: Hum Tyrrell, esq & wife Joan to Guy Crafford of London, esq. Moiety of manor of Beckenham w/500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood & 500a waste in Beckenham. Enfeoffment. (17) (Kent Arch.)

Acknowledges a lease as the land remains Tyrell, in this case Humphrey Tyrell but the pedigree of the Tyrells is unclear as to whether this Humphrey is a direct heir of Thomas Tyrell who was married to Elizabeth Bruyn. This again appears to be a lease (enfeoffment) as the Dalstons in 1623 are connected to the Tyrells. Enfeoffment is connected with some service or commitment. See 1544

The amount of land here seems unlikely, 2,200 acres when the whole manor is described as just over 900  acres on the 1623 map. Either some miscalculation of carucates or other factor has distorted the amount of land. The 500a of waste is presumably mostly made up of Penge Common and the figures are rounded up which looks suspicious.

1542 - Bridget Style, daughter of Sir Humphrey is buried in the vault at St. George's, Beckenham. baptized the 4th March 1539 she died as an infant burial date 6th April 1542. Of the 11 children shown on Sir Humphrey's memorial the record of the fate of some is sketchy. Maria born 1551 by Humphrey's second wife Elizabeth Peryn is described as married to Lawrence Meade in a Visitation of London family tree and no burial record as 'Style' exists. More research of parish registers is needed, though hampered by the damage caused to records during WWII.


1543 – Sir Humphrey Style of Langley Parke is High Sherriff of Kent, a post appointed for one year.

1543/44 – Foot of Fine; Hen Pyknor & wife Cecily to Robt Kyng. Mess, 3a land & 2a mead in Beckenham. £40. (3)Kent Arch 35 Henry VIII. A small transfer and possibly a mistranscription of the name Pykenot which had been associated with Beckenhams early history. This possibly terminates the Pyknot connection with Beckenham as no burials are recorded after records began in 1539. 

1543/44 - Foot of Fine; Licences to alienate lands: Humphrey Tyrrell to Sir Ralph Warren, alderman. Moiety of Bekenham manor and of lands (extent given) in Bekynham, Kent, and of the advowson of Bekenham church. (12th.) P. 18, m. 10. (BHO) and Kent Arch ref 2044. Hum Tyrrell, esq to Sir Ralf Waren, Aldm of London. Moiety of manor (and advowson) of Beckenham w/500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood & 500a waste in Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham & Hayes. £400. (45) see 1541 for earlier ‘lease’ to Crafford. The Tyrrells lease their moiety of Beckenham Manor regularly as absentee landlords.

Apparently a lease as the land reverts to the Tyrells. Tyrell's moiety was the half of Beckenham Manor which descended via Dalston, Curwen to Oliver Style. This implies that Warren's occupancy was under a lease. Evidence points to this moiety being the 'Park' surrounding the Manor House, Copers Cope Farm and Church shown on the 1623 map which describes the part near Penge and other outlying parts as being Snelgrove's in 1623.

About this time the quagmire of the ownership of Beckenham Manor is tied up in the family affairs of the Tyrells. The potential absence of direct heirs looks like the property ownership jumped across lines of generations ie to brothers and nephews. We also have evidence from Keith Baldwin that errors in othere accounts confuse matters. History of Parliament has a Catherine Tyrell marrying John Dalston whereas we believe it was an Ann Tyrell daughter of Robert who carried Beckenham Manor to Dalston. Even the legal historians have problems with the affairs of the Tyrells
http://nbls.soc.srcf.net/files/files/Legal%20History/Supervision%205/2.%20Jones.pdf
suffice it to say, just as Philipot and Hasted found, that the Tyrell moiety of Beckenham Manor descended to Dalston and then the chain to Curwen and the St. Johns becomes clear. Later however some confusion occurs within the St. Johns due to the complexity in their affairs.

 

1544 – Penge; Henry VIII Letters and Papers. ‘land which belonged’ implies it doesn’t any longer perhaps after the dissolution of the monasteries.
Robt. Tyrwhyt, esquire for the Body. To be parker and keeper of the park of Mortlake alias Putneyth Park, Surr., and of the deer there; collector and bailiff of the manors of Batrichesay, Wandelesworth, Halfefarthing and Downe, Surr., and of all lands there and in Penge, Surr., which belonged to St. Peter's, Westminster; and bailiff of the liberty of St. Peter's within the manors of Batrichesay and Wandelesworth, and within the manor of Mordon, Surr. St. Peter's, Westminster. 17 July. St. Peter’s is today’s Westminster Abbey. See 1545

1545 TNA ref: E 305/3/B34 Sir Humphrey Style to Henry VIII 1545 May 11  Court of Augmentations: Deeds of Purchase and Exchange. This reference requires further investigation. The Court of Augmentation was set up in 1536 to administer finances related to the dissolution of the monastaries and without further information we might suspect that Sir Humphrey Style is connected perhaps with some purchase of some monastic properties locally which are referred to in earlier times as being leased. The entry for 1544 (Robert Tyrwhyt) who was a fellow esquire of the Body with Humphrey Style refers to lands which belonged to St.Peter’s Westminster (Westminster Abbey) which is dissolved and becomes a Church of England Cathedral. Whether Style purchased some of those lands is perhaps an avenue of research. Humphrey’s son Edmund later leaves some land in Sydenham (sic Sippenham) to his son Edmund on his marriage.

1545 – The year of the Battle of the Solent and the sinking of the Mary Rose this Muster Roll of men at arms describes men from Beckenham. Several names are familiar. Mandate to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London to publish a proclamation that the King has appointed an army royal to be levied beyond Trent for the annoyance of the Scots and Frenchmen intending displeasure to those parts, and he charges all gentlemen and others dwelling beyond Trent to repair home immediately, and be at the order of his Lieutenant there, except those who are commanded to give personal attendance here. Westminster.

 

Many of the names in the Muster Roll are familiar from records as yeomen. Humphrey Style was a Squire of the Body to Henry VIII and a commissioner for the muster. Among others, Robert Legh acquired part of Beckenham Manor in 1531 from Clement Harleston and the Tyrells of the other moiety are absentee landlords not appearing in the muster. John and William Dawe may be the ones in Beckenham burials for 1557 and 1558 and of Dawes Farm. A Robert Violet is buried in 1559 and a Violet is said to have sold Langley to the Stiles pre 1505. Interestingly there are no Brograves mentioned perhaps because Robert Brograve dies in 1546 and only has daughters or because the Brograves mostly favour their other residences outside the county, see 1546 will of Robert where he describes other tenants his Beckenham properties. The Kynges and Kempsalls are yeomen and one Kynge is a victualler of the George Inn. See 1563 and 1599 for mentions of Kempsall. I assume that landowners were liable for the muster having a vested interest in property? “Ar” denotes Archers and “B” is a Bilman (billhook/halberd/spear type weapon). Splentes are pieces of armour and salettes are helmets. A sheaf of arrows is said to numer 24 arrows. 1545 is the year of the Battle of Ancrum Moor and other incursions into Scotland by Henry’s army as part of what is known as the Rough Wooing. Whether these local men at arms went north is not known but as the date is November 1545 they may not have been called upon but hostilities continued until 1547.

1545 – Foot of Fine; part of Kelsey; Kent Arch. Ref 2397. Robt Brograve, gent to Jn Rogers. 22a land & 2a wood in Beckenham. £20. (74)

A lease of a smallholding belonging to Kelsey?

1545 – Foot of Fine; Unidentified site; Kent Arch. Ref 2401. Jn Harman & wife Joan & Jn Blake & wife Emma to Sim Shotte & wife Agnes, Ric a Wode & wife Denys & Jn a Wode. 1/4 of mess, 45a land, 7a mead, 12a past & 4a wood in Beckenham. £40. (78)

Several names found in burials ie Denys or Dionise Woode, Richard and John.

1545 – Foot of Fine; Kent Arch Ref 2419. Guy a Wood & wife Eliz & Thos Hale & wife Faith to Nic Rokewood & Jn Byll. 3 mess, 44a land, 6a mead & 9a wood in Beckenham & Lewisham; land in Surrey. Enfeoffment. (52/380 no. 2)

Although the acreages are similar and the name Wood is in both the above Feet of Fine possibly it is two moieties of the same messuage? The first describing a ¼ implies a total of about 280 acres. Kent House has been described as two moieties of 140 acres but this may be coincidence. Also, whether fines could relate to sub leases as well as leases could be considered. ‘Land in Surrey’ might relate to Kent House which is near the  Surrey/Penge border.

 
1546 – The will of Robert Brograve of Kelsey. Robert was made main heir of Kelsey by his father William. Robert has three daughters, one married to Hammond and one to Bridges who appear to have had no heirs. Kelsey will ultimately follow the line of Nicholas Brograve, a brother of Robert.  

12 Aug 1546. Robert Brograve of Bekenham (Beckenham) in Kent Esquier being sick etc. If it please God to call me at this present tyme to be buryed within the paryshe churche of Sainct Elen in London.
   Unto my doughter Mary the house and lands belongyng in Bekenham that Leonard Machell nowe dwelleth in after the decease of the sayd Leonard and Jane his wife who hath estates therin duryng their lyves.
   John Hamond my sonne in lawe and to other my extours the house and lands that Harry Staynsmore dwelleth in in the paryshe of Bekingham duryng terme of 7 yeres and after to remayne to my doughter Mary for ever. If she dye without issue then said house etc. that Leonard Machyll dwelleth in shall remayne to my doughters Anne and Margarett and their heyres.
   Said John Hamond and my exors to make unto Henry Staynsmore a newe lease of the house and lands he now dwelleth in for 20 yeres without any fyne takyng of hym. The sayd Harry to bere no reparacyons but dawbing and thacking and to pay the old accustomed rents.
   My extours doo pay yerely 66/8 to the ?muiorns for the bequeste of Mres Reding duryng certen yeres yet to com. Unto high aulter of Bekenham 20s. To the new buylding of the churche of Sainct Ellyns in London 20s. Unto the Kings Benche the Marshalsey Newgate and Ludgate every of them 20s.
   Unto suster in lawe Custaunce Evans 20s.
   I will my wif shalhave all the houshold stuff now in my house at London. My brother Sr Edmond one of my gowns. My sonne in lawe Robert Bridges my gowne faced wyth damaske. All goodes etc. unbequethed to my extours towardes the payment of my debts. I will Harry Staynsmore and ----- Rychbell have their bargayne in the woodes which they bought of me. My brother Sr Edmound yerely 4 lodes of Talwood and 12 qrs of coles duryng his liff naturall. My sonne in lawe John Hamond my gowne furred wyth foynes. My sonne in lawe John Hamond and my brother Sr Edmound my extours.
   To my wif one bedd of downe withall that belongeth therunto. Unto Willyam Browne my servunt 6/8. My doughter Mary two fetherbeddes. Robert my servunt 6/8. By me Robert Brograve.
   To this my will berith witnes Robert Ferond clerke curat, Willyam Sherborne, Rychard Triggs.
To my sonne in lawe John Hamond all my fee symple landes woodes and tenements in Bekenham not bequethed for ever. My doughter Mary to be payde when she is maryed 20 mrks. Robert Bridges my sonne in lawe and Margaret his wife 20 mrks as well in full contentacon of suche legacys as he may clayme by the will of Mres Reding by the right of his wife as also his sayd wiffs thirde parte to be paide when my detts be payd. Unto Mawde my servunt 20s. Unto ----- Hokell the miller of Lewsham 12s. Unto ----- Ruffyn 40s.
   Witnes Robert Body scryvener by me Robert Brograve.
   Probate 4 Oct apud London 1546 by John Hamond exor. Res. ptate Edmundo Brograve cu venerit.

   In August 1546 Robert Brograve of Bekenham Esq. adding to the same his testament did bequeath to Margaret his wife all his leases and termes of yeres that he hath or do enjoy by his sayd wif by mariage and all the landes his father hath entayled in no wise broken. In putia Johannis Hamond exortoris func pnts facente et non reclamante neqz contradicente. Present Robert Ferond clerke, Willyam Sherborne, Rychard Triggs, Robert Fowbery, Agnes Crouche, Robert Vilat, Robert Body.

From this will we can trace Leonard Machell

 died in 1551 in burials.

 
1546 – Penge: Henry VIII Letters and Papers; Assigning rents from Penge and Battersea to the Archbishop of York.

Abpric. of York. Grant to Robert abp. of York and his successors (in consideration of the lordship and manor of Hexham, Nthld., and lands in cos. Nthld., Glouc., Yorks. and Notts, granted by the said Robert to the Crown by indenture of 6 Feb. 36 Hen. VIII.) of the manors of Wistowe and Cowhouse, and park called Reste Park, lands (named) in Cawode, Wistowe and Cowhouse which were parcel of the possessions of Edward late abp. of York and his predecessors. Also the annual rents, due to the late mon. of St. Peter, Westminster, amounting to 15l. 17s. 8d., from lands of the said late abp. and his predecessors in Batrychesey, Wannesworth, Wasshyngham, Bridgecourte and Peng, Surr., and 30s. 1d. from lands in the manor of Alferthing in Wannesworth parish. An annuity of 106s. 8d., a corrody of 8l., and an annuity of 66s. 8d. (paid in lieu of certain oats) which the collegiate church of St. John of Beverley, Yorks., used to pay to the said late abp. and his predecessors. A pension of 10l. 6s. 8d. from the vicar of the parish church of Annes Burton, Yorks., which belonged to the mon. of St. Mary beside the walls of York, and all the lands in Warmesworth, Yorks., which belonged to St. Mary's, York. Rents and service, viz., 36s. from lands of Wm. Thorneton in Lersthorpe, Yorks., and 2s. from lands of Ralph Chapman in Balderbye, Yorks.,— Byland mon. Lands (specified) in tenure of Chr. Stokedale in Peteythorpe Underlefe, Yorks., of Thos. Pynkeney in Thryake, Yorks., of Guy Bell in Crakehall, and of Thos. Nelson beside Brafferton vicarage; Yorks.,—Newbourgh mon. Tithes in Naffreton, Yorks.,— Whitbye mon.; tithes in Kelfelde within the Isle of Axholme, Linc., and in "Estkyngmawdeferrey Est Ferrey," within the said Isle, in tenure of Thos. Hewson, and a pension of 6l. out of the vicarage of Haxey there—Newbourgh. Also tithes of lands called "lez demeanes" in Hutton next Gisbourne, Yorks., in tenure of Adam Pursglove at the rent of 4l. 13s. 4d.,—Gysbourne mon. Also all procurations and synodals, probates of wills, institutions and admissions of clerks and other ecclesiastical jurisdiction in cos. Yorks., Notts., Nthld., and Glouc. which belonged to the said late abp. And his predecessors. The King agrees to accept from all who shall in future be appointed to the archbishopric of York the sum of 1,000l. in full

 
1546 - Humphrey Style [Stile] of Langley, leased Toller’s Broke, the site of Keston Windmill, and 2 other pieces of land in 1546. assuming rent was paid to the Wickham estate (source; Tudor Davis). Stile probably owned adjoining ‘Leafy Grove’ which is shown on the 1740/50 Langley/Jones Raymond map.

 
1547 - King Edward VI until 1553


1547 - Foxgrove: Philipot and Hasted describe; "Humphrey Beversea, I find held it in the eighteenth year of Henry the eighth (1527), and his Descendant passed it away to Luke Hollingworth, and he about the Beginning of K. Edward the sixth (1547), sold his Interest in it to Alderman Sir Jo. Oliff of London.

But we find evidence which disputes this chain of events, in 1555 William Vaus transfers possession by a fine (final accord) to Thomas Acworth, cit & merchant taylour of London. Deforciant: Wm  Vaus, esq (son & heir apparent of Thos Vaus, Ld Harrowden.) Manor of Foxgrove with 20 mess, 500a land, 60a mead, 200a past, 300a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Lewisham & Bromley. £280.(Kent Arch.)

So far we are still looking for the evidence of the Vaux family selling to Beversea and he to Hollingworth but John Oliff’s will dated 1574 and proved 1577 mentions “Foxgrove lately purchased of Reynold Hollingworth. So Philipot’s date and name are questionable. And in 1555 it appears that the Vaux family are still holding Foxgrove, see the 1535 Act evidencing Foxgrove still in the possession of the Vaux’s.

Some time later we find this record where Acworth’s son George’s widow is in some dispute with William Vaux;

C 3/2/63 Short title: Acworthe v Vaux. Plaintiffs: Agnes Acworthe widow.

Defendants: William Vaux Lord Harrowden.

Subject: lands of Sir Thomas Vaus [Vaux] kt, late Lord Harrowden , Northamptonshire.

Document type: [pleadings]. 1558-1579

(source; TNA)
As we have seen there are several instances of leases or enfeoffments being interpreted as sales or transfers.

1547 - The will of Elis Bodley, parson of Beckenham mentions his residence at Beckenham and several bequests to local people. It describes property at his residences in London and Beckenham.

2 Sept. 1547 (1 Edw VI and in earthe supreme headd of the churche of Englonde & Irelonde). I Elys Bodley parson of Saint Stephens in Walbrooke in London and also parson of Beckinhem (Beckenham) in the Diocs. of Rochester in Kent. My soule to almyghte God my Redemer and maker to ower Blyssedd ladye the Virgyn Saint Marye and to all the Saints in heven and my boddye to be buryed within the parryshe churche where it fortune me to decase. My bodye borne by 4 poore folkes them to have 8d apece for their labours. I will that seven of the poreste householders of the parryshe of Saint Stevens and 7 other of Saint Buttolphes nye Billingsgate eache to have 20 pence apece and to other poore persons of Walbrooke warde and Saint Buttolfs warde 4d apece to the some of 53/4. To 20 of the poreste howsholders of the parrishe of Beckingham eche half a busshell wheate and a bushell Rie and also to 13 other of the poreste of them 13d apece in the honour of God ower lady and the 12 appostles and to other poore people twoo pence a pece to the some of 6s8d and to seven poore maydens nexte there to be maryed in the parryshe of Beckinhan 20d apece in the honor of God and ower blyssidd Lady. To the buyldynge of the olde woorke of Powlys 4s.
   If any parte of my brothers testament Mr Thomas Bodley be founde not fulfilled as I truste to God shall not dewlie be provyd by anny boddye my extours to fulfill it in annye wyse above all thinges. I will the plate concernynge Fraunces Bodley my brother Williams son geven unto him by my saide Brother Vicar Maister Thos Bodley which remayneth in my ladys Askewys kepinge be geven to him in dewe tyme accordynge to my brothers testament and lykewyse the porcons of all his Systers remaynynge in my handes that is not delivered all redye to be delivered at there marryage daye or when they come to thage of 18 yeres.
   All such plate of myne remaynynge in my syster Gresham handes to be devyded to the saide Fraunces and his three systers Katheryne, Alice and Gryssell Bodleyes equallye savinge a dozenne spones whiche I will and bequeth to my said Syster Gresham.
   To Katheryne Bodleye my shorte skarlet gowne, a saulte of silver and parcell gilte, half a dozenne spones and a nutt of silver and gilte with a cover besides the porcon aforenamed of the plate aforesaid. To Andrewe Hubbarde sometyme my servunt a fetherbedd, a bolster, a mattress etc. a brass pott, a cobbarde at Bekinghan, twoo candelstickes, a grydyron, a spytt and frynge panne. To John Chambre my gowne furrid with black lambe whiche I do were at Bekingham, my beste dublitt and my shorte Frocke. To every godchilde at London and Beckingham that berithe my name 3/4.
   I will my extours shall provyde to geve to everye house of the Parrishe of Saint Stephens and Saint B. iij spice kaks and iij bunes accordynge to theire discrecon and other of my freends and kynnesfolks more largelier and plentifull to geve.
   I will my waytinge servunt shall have 10s besids his quarters wages. I will that every housholde servunt servinge me at Beckingham to have 5/- besides theire quarters wages and my woman servunte there fyve shillings in money and a nolde gowne that liethe on her bedd. And the tawny to be delivered to John Hall of Lewsham that leyed them to me to plegg longe agoo.
   To my Ladye Askewe for a token to praye for my soule a ringe of golde that I have Redye made and my beste horsse, the best cowe that I have, a quarter of wheate and haulf a quarter of Rie.
   To my syster Gresham a ringe whiche I do were customable and to my Brother her husbande a ringe of golde of fortie shillynges. To my syster Bodlaye at Billingsgate a hoope of golde whiche was my fathers and a horsse. To my cosyn Edmonde Askewe and to Richard his brother eche a golde ringe of 20s. To ?Eme Edmude Askewes doughter and my god doughter 20s. To Xtofer my godson Richarde Askewes sonne 20s. To my Cosyn Dennys Lewsson in Lyme strete and to my cosyn Butler by the Stocks to eche a golde ringe of 13/4. To Sr Henrye Cockes my furred frocke and a pottill pott, a candelstick and a chaver nexte the Dore in my parsonage at London. To Sr Richarde my shorte gowne. To Wm Sherneforde a bedd furnyshed and 40s when he is owte of his yeres.
   I bequethe all the lande and tenements I have at Stretham or anny where ells to my cosyn Fraunces Bodleye and his heires. The Residue of all the goodes, stuff of householde at London and Beckingham my debts and Funeralls paid I geve to my brothers foure children aforesaide and I make my extours my cosyn Lawnslott Haryson grocer to whome I geve for his paynes takyng ij kyen, tenne shepe, a horsse, a bedd furnyshed and my blacke gowne lyned with damaske and my lovynge syster Bettris Bodleye and I make my overseer my cosyn John Marshe of Mylkestrete and I geve to him for his labor a pursse of velvet with the Ringes of silver and gilte. And to my cosyn his wyfe a ringe of golde of twentie shillinges.
    In wytnes wherof I have subscribed this my ? testament and laste will with myne owne hande and sealed with my seale these beinge presente By me James Strotell by me Harry Blower.
   Probate coram duo Cantuarien Achiepoapud London 17 April 1548 by Lancelot Harryson and Beatricis Bodley exors.

http://www.oxford-shakespeare.com/Probate/PROB_11-32-83.pdf

1548 – Wickham Manor/Hayes or Baston Manor? Foot of Fine; Q: Ric, Geo and Thos, Caryll. D: Geo Forman & wife Agnes. 1 mess, 80a land, 20a mead, 100a past, 60a wood in Hayes, W. Wickham, Beckenham & Bromley. 200 marks.(Kent Arch) Unidentified but if a contiguous parcel of land  could be Shortlands, Pickhurst, Langley area. See 1550 and the Carylls can be connected to Seal and Chiddingstone. This George Forman may have been the juryman in several Inquisitions Post Mortem in the City of London and perhaps an Alderman.

1549 - Langley; Sir Humphrey Style acquires an Act of Parliament to ‘disgavel’ his lands. Gavelkind determined that estates were divided between the sons of the landlord. Gavelkind was replaced by primogeniture which determined the eldest son inherited property. It’s rather more complicated than that depending on the sources one reads.

1548 – Langley; death and will of Elizabeth Wolstan, wife of John Stile and James Yarford in that order, mother of Sir Humphrey Style. The will leaves several bequests to her son Humphrey and daughters Bridget and Florence. A codicil on the will leaves property in Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham, Battersea, Tottenham and the City of London to Humphrey. Source; PCC wills. See 1527 Yarford’s post mortem inquisition. Whether the land in Battersea, Tottenham and the City was from her first husband John Style is unclear but Yarford’s property was supposed to go to his kinswoman after Elizabeth’s death.

1549 - Foot of Fine; Q: Wm Parker. D: Hum Tyrrell, esq. Moiety of Manor of Beckenham with 40 mess, 500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Bromley, Hayes, Lewisham. £400. (Kent Arch). The amount of land mentioned in these documents is impossible to reconcile with later audits of land but here this half of the Manor of Beckenham is said to extend into surrounding areas. Also the 40 messuages describes the farms and smallholdings that the manor is divided into. Waste we are thinking may describe Penge Common or Hayes Common. (dated 2/3 Edward VI)

1549 - Foot of Fine; Q: Thos Sirrell,(Tirrell?) esq. D: Wm Parker & wife Margy. Manor of Beckenham with 40 mess, 500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Hayes, Bromley, Lewisham. £400. (dated 3 Edward VI)

These two 1549 fines effectively transfer property between Humphrey Tyrell and Thomas Tyrell via Parker and raises a question as to why? Humphrey Tyrell of Southwokyndond Rokell in Essex dies and leaves a will in 1549 so this is most like the same Humphrey. Southwokyndon Rokell derives from the Rokeles and Bruyn line of descent. Humphrey’s will mentions a cousin Thomas Tyrell but is difficult to read. The name variation could be transcription error. The Tyrell genealogy is difficult to trace with so many Thomas’s and Humphreys. Humphrey had no male heir and this could perhaps transfer the property prior to any bequest at death? The Tyrells had acquired half of Beckenham Manor about a hundred years earlier when an earlier Thomas Tyrell had married Elizabeth Bruyn and this Humphrey and Thomas are grandchildren of Thomas Tyrell and Elizabeth Bruyn. These fines and the earlier one with Warren explain how Philipot and  Hasted deduced that the Beckenham Manor moiety was described as descending via Warren and Parke(r) and as we have found Fines do not always evidence sales but often relate to leases, short term tenancies or enfeoffments. The mention of 40 messuages gives some idea of the number of tenancies on the estate.

1550 – Wickham/Hayes/Baston Manor? Foot of Fine; Q: Th Gavell, Rob Wylloughbye, gent. D: Ric Caryll & wife Clement, Geo, Th Caryll gents. 2 mess, 160a land, 20a mead, 160a past, 40a wood £1 rent in Westerham, Edenbridge, Hayes, W. Wickham, Beckenham, Bromley & Farnborough. 200 marks. (Kent Arch). The diverse areas implies this property is widely spread and divided although described as 2 messuages. Although Hayes, West Wickham, Bromley and Beckenham can in theory be connected by one parcel of land Westerham and Edenbridge are a significant distance away. See 1548 and the Carylls have been associated with Seal and Chiddingstone Manors.

1550 – Related to Langley, second husband of John Style’s wife; Sir James Yarford, knight.

Inquisition taken at the Guildhall, 27 March, 4 Edward VI [1550], before Rouland Hill, knight, Mayor and escheator, after the death of James Yarford, knight, late mercer and alderman of the City of London, by the oath of John Morryce, Edward Tagge, Thomas Peycocke, John Laylond, Thomas Petytte, Thomas Dyxyll, Robert Moldyng, William Wytte, John Sampson, Christopher Jacson, Thomas Jurdan, Richard Pagett, John Trull (?), George Forman, John Metheryngham, William Bessewicke, Thomas Michell, William Morreis and Robert Graunt, who say that

James Yarford was seised of 1 capital messuage, 1 large garden, and 5 large messuages or tenements to the said capital messuage adjoining—2 of which said 5 messuages are on the north side of the said capital messuage and 3 on the south—situate in the parish of St. Michael in Bassyngeshawe in the ward of Bassyngeshawe, London; 1 messuage called the hole Bulle and 3 tenements or small messuages thereto belonging, situate in the parish of All Souls' in hony lane in the ward of Chepe, London; and 1 yearly and quit rent of £3 6s. 8d. issuing out of a messuage called the Red Lyon, and 4 messuages adjoining thereto, then situate in the parish of St. Nicholas ad Macellas, London, and now in the parish of Christ Church (p[ar]ochia eccl[es]ie Xp[ist]i) in the ward of Faryndon, London.

So seised, the said James Yarford made his will in the said parish of St. Michael in Bassyngeshawe on the 10th day of June, 1527, and thereby devised to Dame Elizabeth Yarjord, his wife, all the said premises: to hold for her life without impeachment or waste, so that after her death the said premises should remain to the wardens and community of the mystery of the Mercers of London and to their successors for ever.

The said premises are held of the King in free burgage, and are worth per ann., clear, £40 and more.

James Yarford died 22 June, 19 Henry VIII [1527]; Margaret Colard, widow, is his kinsman and next heir, to wit, daughter of — Yarford, brother of the said James Yarford, knight, and is now aged 60 years and more.

The said Dame Elizabeth Yarford, widow, died 18 August, 2 Edward VI [1548].

Inq. p.m. 4 Edward VI, p. 2, No. 48. (BHO)

 

1551 – Foot of Fine; Unknown but Greenwich inclusion may relate to part of Old Court Manor? Q: Robt Altam. D: Wm Cure & wife Anne. 6 mess, 40a land, 10a mead, 20a past, 10a wood in Deptford, Greenwich, Bromley, Hayes & Beckenham. £120.

1551-3; Kelsey, Court of Chancery; Short title: Brograve v Brograve.

Plaintiffs: Mary BROGRAVE.

Defendants: John BROGRAVE and Richard WYGMORE.

Subject: Lands and woods (described) in Beckenham and Hayes of the demise of Robert Brograve. Kent.


This appears to relate to Robert Brograve's daughter Mary who was unmarried at the time of his death. Robert Brograve d.1546  of Beckenham, Kent (Kelsey), leaves a will and requests to be buried in a London Church (St. Ellen?). Bequests; House in Beckenham to daughter Mary, occupied by Leonard Machell and his wife until their death. Another house and land in Beckenham to John Hammond, son in law occupied by Henry Stainesmore. Machell, Stainesmore and Hammond families are recorded in parish register entries. John Hammond, Robert's son in law married to daughter Anne is left any remaining property not already bequested. There is mention of woods bargained to be sold to Stainesmore and Machell which should be honoured. Stainesmore  has a  twenty  year  lease on the house and land he occupies. If Robert's daughter Mary dies without issue then the two houses mentioned go to Robert's other dauthers Margaret and Anne.  We are left with questions as to how the land ended up after leases expired and whether any issue from the daughters and their husbands inherited property?  There are several Hammonds in parish registers, some annotated as being of Penge and possibly these  descended from John Hammond and Anne Brograve? Margaret  had married a Robert Bridges and they appear to have resided elsewhere as they only were bequested some money in Robert's will

But  there are some codicils to the will which seem to confuse  the outcome  and a "sentence" by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury appears to alter the outcome of the will mentioning Margaret Brograve.

We have to defer to later wills and records wherein the Brograve property is  recorded.

1552 - Foot of Fine; Q: Hen Stanmore. D: Mary Brograve. 1 mess, 8a land, 16a mead, 20a past, 6a wood called Longs in Beckenham. £60. (Kent Arch). Stanmore is seeking to acquire land from Brograve by a sale or in some cases a lease. This is probably a lease as the Brograve sell to Burrell in 1688. See 1545 Muster Roll, Staynsmore who is most likely a yeoman holding some property of his own.

1552 - Foot of Fine; Q: Ric Wigmore, mercer of London. D: Jn Brograve. Manor of Kelsellys with 4 mess, 23a mead, 155a past, 160a wood in Beckenham. 1000 marks. (Kent Arch). A lease of land belonging to the Kelsey Brograves

1552 – Langley; Death of Sir Humphrey and funeral 7th April; and his son Sir Edmund Style inherits Langley from his father. Sir Humphrey is buried in St. George’s Church.

    

Humphrey Style’s memorial plaque showing 9 children by his first wife Bridget Baldry(Bauldry) and 2 by his second Elizabeth Peryn. Elizabeth survived him and remarried. Possibly Edmund Style the next heir was still a minor having been born in 1538 and would have been under the guardianship of Elizabeth’s second husband Christoper Mead. It was customary for widows to be remarried often at the behest of the king, as with the Bruyn sisters of Beckenham Manor each having three husbands.

Humphrey’s will mentioned various bequests to the poor of Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham and Hayes. Also some bequests to mend the highways between Bromley and Farnborough and between Lewisham Mill(Southend?) and Beckenham Church from the foot of Stumpes Hill.

See 1579 Court of Chancery.

1553 - Queen Mary I until 1558

1553 - Foot of Fine; Q: Hen Brograve. D: Jn Brograve, gent. Manor of Kelsys with 6 mess, 400a land, 100a mead, 200a past, 300a wood in Beckenham & Hayes. £600.
A transfer of land from John Brograve to Henry Brograve.

1555 - Foxgrove; Foot of Fine Querant: Thos Acworth, cit & merchant taylour of London. Deforciant: Wm  Vaus, esq (son & heir apparent of Thos Vaus, Ld Harrowden.) Manor of Foxgrove with 20 mess, 500a land, 60a mead, 200a past, 300a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Lewisham & Bromley. £280.(Kent Arch.)

The description of 20 messuages illustrates that Foxgrove accommodated several smallholdings and contradicts the later descriptions of Foxgrove being just one entity. But without a full description there are probably other properties attached to Foxgrove. The 1720 map (1766 copy) of Foxgrove Manor describes about 300 acres belonging to Jones Raymond in 1766 with significant other parts held by John Cator. But we have to allow for possibly disposals of parts of the manor. This evidences Acworth acquiring the property from William Vaus. Some time later Acworth’s son George’s widow Agnes is in litigation with William Vaux but we have no details so far apart from references in The National Archive;

Reference: C 3/2/63 Short title: Acworthe v Vaux.
Plaintiffs: Agnes Acworthe widow.
Defendants: William Vaux Lord Harrowden.
Subject: lands of Sir Thomas Vaus [Vaux] kt, late Lord Harrowden , Northamptonshire.
Document type: [pleadings].

Date: 1558-1579

Reference: C 4/127/78 Agnes Ackworth, George Ackworth and Thomas Ackworth v. William Vans, Lord Hawwden: rejoinder16th century
C 4/119/2 Agnes Ackworth, George Ackworth and Thomas Ackworth v. William Vaus, Lord Harowden: answer16th century.

The dates are less than definitive so we are looking for further evidence between this, Philipot’s reference to Humphrey Beversea so far untraceable through evidence and Reynold Hollingworth’s mention of Foxgrove in John Oliff’s will dated 1574, proved in 1577 at his death.

1555 – Unknown property; Foot of Fine; Q: Wm Curtes, Jn Skelton. D: Thos Whyte & wife Sibyll. 2 cottages & 2 gdns in Beckenham. £20. (Kent Arch)

1556 - Approximate date of birth of John Dalston (1556-1609) of Cumberland who by marrying a Tyrell heiress will acquire one moiety of Beckenham Manor. Dalston is mentioned on the map of 1623 along with Henry Snelgrave (Snelgar).

1557 - Beckenham (High Street) and Shortlands Green and Bromley; Monday next before F. of Trans, of S. Edward, K. and C. [13 Oct.]. Swane (John), of the town of Bromley, co. Kent, draper.—To be buried in the parish church of S. Peter, Bromley. To John his eldest son his mansion house and tenements in the parish of S. Mary Abohuroh(Abchurch) in S. Laurence Pownteney Lane, and his leasehold farm called "Shorams" in the parish of Beckenam, co. Kent, in tail; remainder to Edith and Agnes his daughters. To Anne his wife his house at Bromley called "the taberde" for life, with similar remainder; and a field called "Barnet." Bequests to his daughters' children, his servants, and others. Dated 13 February, A.D. 1557.
Roll 251 (166).

Calendar of Wills Proved and Enrolled in the Court of Husting, London: Part 2, 1358-1688. (BHC)

Shorams could be several fields with that name which are part of the Kelsey estate belonging to (under lease from) the Brograves at this time. Barnets might possibly be what becomes Borngattes but also possibly an unidentified field in Bromley. The Taberde (Tabard) may well be a public house?

 
1558 – Elizabeth I until 1603

1558 – Beckenham/Penge/Battersea; Surrey Wills ref; SW/6_26
Richard Kinge of Battersea, yeoman, senior, sick 20 Aug 1558 (to be buried in churchyard)
to wife Elizabeth Kinge £2 p.a. for life by my son Richard from my messuage at Beckenham, Kent, but if she claims dower payment ceases; to Richard messuage etc., above; my nephew Arnold Kinge and my tenant ... Curtes shall have governance of RK and messuage until he is 21; to son Ralph Kinge forty marks (£10 within fourteen weeks of my death, rest when wife thinks fit); to son Gregory Kinge forty marks at 21 or marriage; to each of my three daughters Elizabeth Kinge, Margery Kinge and Sarah Kinge £10 each when 21 or married; to servant Richard Johnson 10s; to maid [and goddaughter] Elizabeth Mychell 6s 8d; to godchildren (except RJ & EM above) 6d each; residue to wife Elizabeth, exec.
Overseers: John Heyre; cousin Arnold Kinge (6s 8d each)
Witnesses: John Eyre; Rowland Jackson; John Simpson; Maud Eyre
Proved: 26 May 1559 to exec. [DW/PA/7/6 ff.24v-26r; DW/PA/5/1559/27]

The King family or families occur regularly in the history being associated with Foxgrove Farm, the George Inn etc. and several burial records. The Curtes/Curtyses also occur in burials and it is interesting that they are tenants of King. Two Richard Jhonsons (sic) appear in burials circa 1580.

1559 - Richard Johnson and wife Joan, cousin & heir of Raphe Hamond & right heir of Robert Hamond, father of the said Raphe, that is to say daughter & heir of William Hamond, son & heir of the said Raphe v. Robert Hamond.Four messuages and 50 acres of land in Beckenham, Kent and Penge, Surrey, [Kent]. Dismission.

Dismission means dismissal from a position and I take it that Johnson et al are dismissing Robert Hamond from a  tenancy of the messuages etc. This Robert Hammond may be the one who dies in 1561 recorded in Beckenham Burials. There are 35 burial records for  Hammond with a few spelling variations and possibly Roberts wife and son have recently died? Some possibly relevant burials below.

1541 HAMMONDE William s of Robert
1543 HAMMONDE Rafe
1552 HAMOND William
1553 HAMONDE Jhon
1556 HAMONDE Margaret
1557 HAMONDE Marye w of Roberte
1559 HAMONDE Richarde s of Robert
1561 HAMMONDE William s of Robert

1560 – Battersea/Penge? Surrey Wills ref: SW/15_8
Robert Hammond of Battersea, sick 8 Jan 1560/1 (to be buried in the churchyard of Beckenham, Kent where my children choose to lay me and to its poor 1s 8d)
to son Thomas all houses and land in Surrey and Kent; to Joan and Thomas Wode £1 13s 4d and to Mary Wod £1 13s 4d; my exec. to discharge John Kylyngworth for legacies of Thomas Wod's will for the two children; to Alice daughter of John Wode £3 at 18 with remainder to Mary Waller and to her £2 at marriage; to John Kyllengworth two steers (a black one and a black four year old hawked one); to wife Agnes two kine, £4 and stuff she brought at marriage and my little house by road for life; to my godchildren 4d each; to my servant Ann Curtis 3s 4d; to my servant Joan Paythey 3s 4d; to Robert Wodestok 3s 4d; to widow Dobbys, widow Hubard and widow Wodstoke 8d each; residue to my son Thomas, exec.; to Agnes daughter of John Wodestock £1 at 18 for the goods of her father and to Harry Wodestock 13s 4d at 18
Overseers: John Batte; John Kyllengworth (3s 4d each)
Witnesses: Arnold Kyng; John Grantam; Robert Woodstok
Proved: 16 Jun 1561 to exec. [DW/PA/5/1561/8]

Among the names mentioned of interest are the Batts who are long time yeomen and tenant farmers and Kyng. Other names appear in the burial records adding more substance to the early history of the area. Robert Hamonde (sic) is entered for the 9th January 1561 in burials. Agnes Hamon left a will, see 1562.

1561 - Sydenham; possibly adjoining Kent House or Penge. The Batt family feature in several records in this history. Mainly based in Penge they both lease land from other landlords and become landowners in their own right. Sippenham/Sydenham is close or nex to Penge. The name Batt might be a derivation from Battersea or Batricksye as it was sometimes spelt.

ry

London Borough of Bromley Archives

Level

Item

Ref No

242/1

Title

Bargain and sale enrolled for £60 of Rasselande, a messuage, orchard, garden, and land (12a.) at Sippenham, formerly occupied by John Hewes, now occupied by Batt

Date

14 April 1561

Description

Edward Dove, citizen of London, clothmaker to Nicholas Legh of Beckenham, gentleman.

Extent

1 Item

 
1562 - Parish: Bexley, Plumstead but in connection with John Olyffe of Foxgrave (Foxgrove). Although quoted as ‘of Foxgrave’ no evidence of residence at Foxgrove has been found. The descendants, Joan his daughter and her husband Francis Leigh adopted Hawley/Plumstead as a residence but some generations resided elsewhere. The archive description does give more background for Olyffe, being and alderman etc.

Earliest reference: 1610 TNA SP14/58/19 licence to impark

Ownership:    Edward VI  to Sir Martin  Bowes  > Thomas,  duke  of Norfolk (CPR 1561)> 1562 manorial rights purchased by Sir John  Olyffe of Foxgrave, Kent,  alderman  of London  whose heir Joan m.  John Leigh, son and heir of Nicholas Leigh of Addington 1576, son Olyff Leigh much enlarged seat there > Christian the wife of his son Sir Francis Leigh there in Charles I' reign

 

1562 – Lord Vaux of Harrowden; This reference perhaps describes the attitude of Lord Vaux; see 1555 and 1564 for mention of Acworth.

Lord Vaux would not, of course, have been a true Elizabethan if he had not been frequently in the law-courts. The earliest case is in April 1562 when Agnes, widow of George Acworth, of Potton (Beds.) sued him in Chancery for debts incurred by his father. He was ordered to appear in person on 6 May, but here as in

moSt suits the judgement is not recorded. 24 About 1576 his sister Maud and her husband Anthony Burgh or Borrows sued him in the same court for lands in Irthlingborough, IrcheSter, Laxton (Northants.) and other property, bequeathed by their mother Elizabeth to her children. They claim that William has kept her will a secret and pretended that it was not found in any Inquisition, and their repeated requests to see the will have been fruitless. But these cases were only minor annoyances that would hardly ruffle the serene and care-free life of the Lord of Harrowden.

https://archive.org/stream/vauxofharrowdenr00anst/vauxofharrowdenr00anst_djvu.txt

 

1562 – Battersea/Penge? Surrey Wills ref; SW/15_133
Agnes Haman alias Banckes of Battersea, widow 16 Dec 1562 (to be buried in the churchyard of Beckenham, Kent and to its poor 3s 4d)
to my daughter Margery Chatterton of Lewisham, Kent a featherbed I lie on, a bolster and its trappings, a cupboard, a brass pot and after death of my wife a cupboard to her daughter Grace and brass pot to Margaret; to Thomas Banckes, snr. a chest and lock and key; to John Cossey another chest and lock and key; to Robert Muscroppe's wife a petticoat and kerchief; to Robert Wood 3s 4d; residue to son John Banckes of Wickham, Norwood, exec.; re land in Beckenham: it to my son John for life and then to his heirs of that name; to my cousin Thomas Banckes £16 out of land; to my cousin John Banckes of Beddington £16 out of land at 21 with remainder to his sister £8; if payment behind they may distrain on land Picknott's Field, Beckenham, Kent
Overseers: friends Thomas Kempsall; Thomas Wood (6s 8d each)
Witnesses: Brian Ball; Richard Balden; Vincent Ball; Robert Garret, priest and writer
Proved: 7 Nov 1562 to exec. [DW/PA/5/1562/42]

 

See 1561 for Agnes’s husband’s will Hammond. Although we’ve linked Agnes with Robert Hammond it looks like the marriage of Agnes and Robert may have been second marriages for both of them?

 

1563 – Will of Harry Wod/Wood from which we can see the relationship to the Batt family, the evidence of property owned and the mention of Kempsall who is another yeoman with land near Wickham Road. Harry/Henrye is buried at St.George’s Beckenham on the 7th May 1563

 

Surrey Wills ref; SW/15_261
Harry Wod of Battersea, sick 6 May 1563 (to be buried in the churchyard of Beckenham, Kent; to poor of Beckenham 1s each)
to my son Edmund Wod two kine (of £1 10s each); to my daughter Bridget Wod two kine (of £1 10s each) both at 12; each to be each other's heir if they die before they marry; to my wife Agnes Wod my house and land for life and after death of my wife to my son Edmund and daughter Bridget and if both die without issue to my godson Harry Batt son of John Batt paying to my brother Thomas Wod's children and to my brother Robert Wod's children now alive £3 6s 8d and to my sister Jane Batt's children and to my sister Denise's child and to his own brothers £1 each; residue to my wife, exec.
Overseers: Thomas Kempsall; Thomas Hamond (3s 4d each)
Witnesses: Thomas Kempsall; Thomas Hamond; Thomas Wod; Robert Scott
Proved: 2 Jul 1563 to exec. [DW/PA/5/1563/86]

1564 – Foxgrove; Philipot claims that Humphrey Beversea acquired Foxgrove in this year but we have found no confirmation of it but have found evidence to dispute it.  Several differences with Philipot’s account are recorded in this time line. See 1555 where William Vaus disposes of Foxgrove to Thos Acworth, cit & merchant taylour of London. Deforciant: Wm Vaus, esq (son & heir apparent of Thos Vaus, Ld Harrowden.) Manor of Foxgrove with 20 mess, 500a land, 60a mead, 200a past, 300a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Lewisham & Bromley. £280.(Kent Arch.)

1567 - Beckenham Manor, 1 moiety; Robert Leigh the elder dies and buried at St.George's. Not related to the Leighs of Addington or Foxgrove.

1569 - Bromley HC

Ref No 242/3
Acc No 242
Title Bond for £40 for possession of cottage, garden, and curtilage (1 acre) at Sippenham, occupiers: James Woodden, James Eden; refers to bargain and sale of same date
Description James Woodden to Nicholas Leigh and Bridget, his wife.
Date 27 August 1569

1570 - Manor of Beckenham; under Elizabeth I; A Petition of John Johnson to Sir Wm. Cecill. Requests that examination be made of a lease, by which one-half of the lordship of Beckenham, Kent, the property of one Tyrrell, a ward, is demised to Robert Ligh (Legh), by Humphrey Tyrrel and Jane his wife. (BTO)

Robert Ligh (Legh/Leigh) had acquired the other moietie of Beckenham Manor from Clement Harleston and is leasing the other moiety from Tyrell. The Tyrell moiety will revert to Tyrells and descend to Dalston and Curwen via family intermarriages. And the Harleston/Leigh half will be purchased by Sir Henry Snelgrave.

1570 – Will of John Cawston which includes property in West Wickham and Beckenham. Some Cawstones in Beckenham burials from the 1560’s. A Willmotts Field is recorded in properties in Beckenham but Cookes hasn’t been traced so far. But we see how widely distributed the property of Yeomen could be and the value of belongings which these days are regarded as disposable ie a pair of sheets and napkins. Some Beadles are recorded in burials, the nearest one being a widow Margaret in 1616. See 1500 where William Causten acquires property, this may be the same property descended to John and leased to Beadle and 1456 where Causten already has some property.

SW/15_569
John Cawsten of South Lambeth, yeoman, sick 13 Aug 1570 (to be buried in church of Water Lambeth; to poor of Water Lambeth £1; to poor of Orpington, Kent where I was born £1)
to my sister Sybil wife of George Parker three acres of barley; to Catherine Stephenson a quarter of barley; to my poor kinsman Christopher Holmedon £12 at 21, but my son in law William Easton to pay him this for ten wether sheep and ten ewe sheep part of cattle I sold him 16 Aug this year; to my brother Thomas Cawsten two bushels of rye and £1; to my brother Robert Master £2 6s 8d; to my brother in law George Parker the £2 6s 8d he owes me; I forgive my brother in law Anthony Heathe all the corn he borrowed and to his daughters £1 each at 14; to my sisters Heathe, Holmeden and ... Woodd of Beddington a small gold ring I had of my brother Parker; to my godson John Jowx a ewe sheep; to my other godchildren 1s each; to my wife Isabel Cawsten bed and a bedstead I lie in, two featherbeds, two bolsters, two pillows, two coverlets, five pairs of sheets, all her clothes, four pewter platters, four pewter dishes, four saucers, a great brass pan her father gave me, a little brass pot, a copper kettle she bought, a little bottle, a posnet, a brass ladle, a skinner, two lead candlesticks, a tablecloth, six napkins, two pillowcases, a silver salt her father gave her, two silver spoons that were her father's, two quarters of wheat, two quarters of rye, two quarters of barley, two quarters of oats, half poultry, my pigeons breeding in my dovehouse and £6 13s 4d (two milch cows and little dun nag she rides on are part of bargain to William Easton); to my brother William Cawsten of Oxted a little gold ring with a red stone in my chest and one of the 15s rials of gold part of £5 I lent him;
to my friend Francis Willmott a little gold ring with a red stone on my little finger; residue to my son in law William Easton and his wife Sybil my daughter, execs.; re land: to William Easton and Sybil his wife for life all my estate, messuage and land (60 acres) called Cookes, West Wickham and Beckenham, Kent in the occupation of ... Beadle and after their deaths (if they die without issue) to Percival son of my brother Robert with successive remainders to his brother William and my godson John Cawsten; to my daughter Sybil messuage etc. in Limpsfield for life and if she dies without issue to my godson John Cawsten son of my brother William Cawsten with remainder to Percival Cawsten; if William and Sybil Easton live in my house in South Lambeth as I do they to permit my brother in law John Holmeden and his wife Agnes Holmeden (my sister) to have for six years my messuage Stockenden, Limpsfield which John occupies paying 20 marks p.a. but my wife to live also in house in South Lambeth and they may dispossess John but must give him a year's warning and five marks among his children; they also to permit my tenant ... Beadle for seven years after my death to live where he now does in Wickham and Beckenham for £6 p.a. rent or if they dispossess him to pay him £2 6s 8d
Overseers: brother William Cawsten; Robert Master

1575 – Kelsey; Henry Brograve (son of Nicholas) in his will leaves Kelsey which he describes the property as “Kelseyes in Kellselle Beckenham and Hayes” but describes himself as of “Buntingford in the parish of Leyton” and like many Brograves is not buried in Beckenham. Kelsey is left in dower to his wife Margaret Campion. Then it becomes his son John’s and bequests are made to daughters Ann and Marie. Does his description of Kelsey imply a name of the house within the wider property of Kellselle?

1577 - Foxgrove; Sir John Oliffe dies in possession of Foxgrove and leaves it to his son in law John Leigh. Philipot had stated: Luke Hollingworth, and he about the Beginning of K. Edward the sixth (1547), sold his Interest in it to Alderman Sir Jo. Oliff of London, and he dying (1577) without Issue Male, Joan(his daughter) matched (1563)to John Leigh of Addington Esquire, was his sole Heir (1577).

From genealogy research, Reynold Hollingworth m Mary Bristow 1565 Old Jewry, children Edward, Peter, Reynold, Mary, Elizabeth, Henry, John & Margaret. He died 1578 Will states family as Edward, Peter, Reignold, Mary. Elizabeth, Henry, John, cousin Robert Holte gent of Asherworth Lancs, cousin Reignold Hollingworth & his son Reignold, cousin William Sollyer taylor, sister Dromxe, wife Mary. Wife Mary remarried to Michael Warner who died 1603. No death date for Mary. Reynold seems to be a family name as he had a cousin of the same name. It looks like the sale of property to John Oliff was in anticipation of his death.

This extract below from Sir John Oliff’s will describes several bequests including Foxgrove to John and Joan Leigh for life and it then passes to their eldest son Oliph Leigh. As the will states ‘late purchased of Reynold (Regynold?) Hollingworth the transfer is close to the date of the will of 1574 challenging Philipot’s description and perhaps implying that Luke Hollingworth was succeeded by Reynold Hollingworth?

John Leigh dies before Sir John Olyffe and Foxgrove and several other properties in Kenty and Surrey are left to his grandson Oliph Leigh.  A will of a member of the Styles family notes an exchange of some land between Oliph Leigh and the estates of Langley and presumably Foxgrove. (unspecified). Sir John Olyffe’s will mentions Arnold Kinge, his farmer who can be traced in Beckenham burials. The King family had long association with Foxgrove Farm.

We can find some burials at St. Bride Fleet Street and St.Margaret’s Lothbury of children belonging to Reynold Hollingworth whether this is the same Reynold or his son is debatable. It perhaps indicates that Hollingworth was another City merchant and perhaps Reynold’s father was Luke as mentioned by Philipot?

See 1555 where William Vaus disposes of Foxgrove to Thomas Acworth, Merchant Taylor. So we are left with Philipot getting the Grene’s and Vaux’s the wrong way round and some disputes with his dates. The chain goes; Grene, Vaus, Acworth........Hollingworth, Oliffe, Leigh and we search for a connection between Acworth and Hollingworth with no records to show Humphrey Beversea as mentioned by Philipot.

1578 – Penge area; Croydon/Battersea puts this near the top of current day Anerley Hill? Reference: TNA E 133/3/464B Description: Elizabeth Rydon, widow, queen's farmer, v. Hugh Goldwell and others. Wood felled in a certain piece of waste ground lying at the north-west end of Gravell Hill Coppys, by Henry Rydon, and carried to the manor house of Croydon, by order of Matthew Parker,archbishop of Canterbury. Bounds between the parishes of Croydon and Battersea. Alleging that the parishioners of Croydon, while perambulating their bounds, were stopped from entering the coppice by Thomas Kempsall. Beds & Surrey. Date: 20 Eliz I, Easter.

Kempsall is mentioned in other entries, a yeoman landowner. Rydon may be the origin of local names Reddons. Perambulating their bounds sounds like ‘beating the bounds’ as carried out to confirm parish boundaries and here it seems to have come up against what are parish boundaries and what are private property boundaries.

1579 – Langley etc.: Court of Chancery, Short title: Style v Touneshend.

Plaintiffs: Edmund Style.

Defendants: Thomas Touneshend and Dame Elizabeth Touneshend his wife.

Subject: manor of Langley alias Little Cowsted and property in Beckenham, Bromley, Hayes, Lewisham, Isle of Sheppey, Deptford, [Gilling…], Kent; Addington, Surrey; Waltham, Essex; Northamptonshire; Calais etc.

Document type: [pleadings]. (TNA)

Edmund was the primary heir of Humphrey Style d. 1552 and Elizabeth Townsend was his second wife and widow subsequently married to Townsend and probably a Nicholas Rookwood. Edmund as plaintif is perhaps seeking to regain property. The possibility of marriage settlement, dower or bequests might explain the reasons. This also links Langley in Beckenham with Langley near Maidstone and Cowstead farms appear near Sittingbourne (Gillingham?) and Sheppey.

1583 - Beckenham Manor moiety; Nicholas Leigh dies and leaves a will although no record of his burial is at Beckenham indicating he may have resided or died elsewhere. Note; this is not the Leighs of Foxgrove but the family who acquired half of Beckenham Manor through John Leigh who also acquired Bellingham Manor in Lewisham. There is a record for Bridget wife of Nicholas buried in 1579.

1585 - Court of Common Pleas, Hilary Term Kent, trespass; close and taking; Haddon, Francis, gent, Lane, Robert of Beckenham, Carpenter

1588 – The Spanish Armada

1589 – (after); Beckenham Manor moiety; Sir John Dalston of Cumberland marries (Ann?) Catherine Tyrell or Tirrel, daughter and heiress of Thomas Tirrel (source: History of Parliament) However, current research is indicating that the wife's name was Ann. In any case this was Dalston's second marriage at the age of about 33. The couple had two daughters, one of whom married Henry Curwen. Whether the Thomas Tyrell of whom she was heiress was a son/ward of Humphrey Tyrell in earlier feet of fines requires some confirmation. See 1570. Dalston is MP for Carlisle in 1589.

1590 - The Will of Izarde Curtis or Curtys of Beckenham, widow of William Curtys, is reported as recording " my house and lande within the pische of Lewisham called Stumpeshill" (source: Robert Borrowman 1910) 'pische' is an alternative spelling or abbreviation of "parish". Whether this refers to property on the site of Beckenham Place is speculative but may be supported by indications of buildings on Rocque's map of 1745. At present it is the earliest written indication we have for buildings on or near the site. Frustratingly, wills and property deeds often lack any map or detail to allow for identification of land.

1591 – Manor of West Wickham; some land in Beckenham and elsewhere. Exemplification of Fine Of manors of Chevening, West Wickham, Baston, Southcourt and Keston, 4 messuages, 2 tofts, 2 gardens, 1000a. land, 40a. meadow, 100a. pasture, 40a. woodland, 200a. heathland, £20 in rents all in Chevening, West Wickham, Keston, Hayes, Beckenham, Lewisham, Bromley, Farnborough, Downe and Cudham, with advowson of West Wickham church and also free warren and market and farms in West Wickham. [William Stanford and Walter James plt (plaintiff). and John, Sampson and Samuel Lennard, def (deforciant). Seal of Court of Common Pleas.] [H. M. C. 770] 1591Kent History and Library Centre  Ref;U1384/T1/17. The Beckenham portion is thought to be adjacent to Kent House and Penge giving rise to Lennard Road. The reference doesn’t indicate who is acquiring the property from whom but as Lennard is indicated as deforciant it would appear that Stanford and James are acquiring a lease here and that Lennard had already acquired the property. The Lennards held Chevening and West Wickham etc and although Hasted does not give a year for the Lennards acquisition of West Wickham Manor this would seem to fit his description “Sir John Heydon, of Baconsthorpe, knight, his son, inherited this manor, and left it at his death to his eldest son, Sir Christopher Heydon, whose son, of the same name, was a man of some note in the reign of queen Elizabeth; his son and heir, Sir William Heydon, succeeded to this manor in the twenty-second year of that reign, the same being then held of the queen, as of the honour of Albermarle, by knights service; he alienated it in the latter end of that reign to John Lennard, of Chevening, esq. custos brevium of the common-pleas, who purchased it for his second son, Samuel Lennard, and, besides, left to him, by his will, five hundred marcs per annum.”

1591 – Penge area?; Contents SW/17_693 Elizabeth Rydon of Battersea, widow 31 May 1591

the will of my late husband Henry Rydon to be performed; to my sister Bridget Duecke, widow my best grogran gown; to my sister ... Knight of Kingston Hill my best black gown; to my sister ... Marshe my wedding ring; to my cousin Henry Duecke and his wife my great silver salt which I bought from his mother; to my cousin Ann Lipscum £10; to my cousin John Embersome £5; to my cousin Elizabeth Woode £5; to Joan Rydon daughter of William Rydon £20 and £10 more her father has of mine, four pairs of sheets, two tablecloths and 24 napkins; to Elizabeth Holgate £5; to John Palmer a cow; to Elizabeth Alife wife of William Alife, gentleman £20, a bedstead, my best bed and its trappings in the parlour, a coverlet which I bought from (Mr) Bowes, four pillowcases, four pairs of sheets, two plain tablecloths of the best, 48 plain napkins, two long towels with fringe with a cupboard, table, six joined stools, four cobirons in the parlour, silk curtains and valence for a bed of blue and yellow taffeta; to my godson William Holcroft £30, a standing bedstead in the great chamber, a great coverlet lined with canvas, a featherbed, a bolster, blankets, a mattress, a pillow, four pairs of good sheets and four pillowcases; to Henry Holcroft, snr. £30; to Ann Holcroft the bed in the little parlour, a featherbed, a bolster, blankets, curtains, two pillows, four pillowcases, four pairs of sheets and the other coverlet lined with canvas; to Mary Holcroft £20, a featherbed, blankets, a coverlet, two pillows, four pairs of sheets and two pillowcases; to Thomas Holcroft £10; to Geoffrey Holcroft £10; to Henry Holcroft, jnr. £10; to Thomas Gregorye two of my best oxen and a red mare colt; to Nicholas Gregorye a colt fellow to the red mare colt; to Ann Woode £5; to Joan Holcroft wife of Thomas Holcroft, gentleman late deceased all my room and that which is in the barn, that which grows on the ground late in the occupation of her husband; I hold land now enclosed called Lady Acre, Clapham - the rent first to my poor godchildren and then to poor of Battersea and therefore give it to William son of Thomas Holcroft, gentleman late deceased for rest of 1,000 years paying £1 p.a.; to 12 poor women a gown of sheep colour to accompany me at my burial; to the 'persons' £1; Joan Holcroft widow of Thomas, exec.

Overseers: (Mr) Morrell; (Mr) Emberson

Witnesses: Robert Pakenham; Richard Neale; Roger Morrell

Proved: 28 Aug 1593 to exec. [DW/PA/5/1593/83] See earlier references for Rydon, 1531 etc. There are no burial records for Rydon or Reddon in Beckenham so perhaps there are in Croydon or Battersea parishes since the Surrey border enclosed Penge hamlet and came close to Kent House Farm.

1596 - Penge: There seem to have been several tenants of the manor at Penge in 1596, (source: H.E.Malden, An extract from: A History of the County of Surrey, 1912)
The 'hamlet' of Penge was part of the ancient ecclesiastical parish of Battersea. The curious anomalies of its local government led to its formation as a separate urban district and its transfer to the county of Kent in 1900. (fn. 49) Penge was a wooded district, over which the tenants of Battersea Manor had common of pasture. (fn. 50) The boundaries of the hamlet on the north in February 1604–5 were the common of Rockhills (evidently Rockhills in Upper Sydenham, immediately north of the Crystal Palace) and the 'Shire Ditch' leading past the house called 'Abbetts' to the north corner of 'Lord Riden's Wood.' The Shire Ditch also bounded the hamlet on the east and was crossed by 'Willmoores Bridge,' half in Kent and half in Surrey. On the south it was bounded by the waste or common of Croydon, the green way from Croydon to Lewisham. On the west was a wood 'of Mr. Colton's' in Camberwell parish, which stretched from Vicker's Oak to the Low Cross near Rockhills. (fn. 51) There seem to have been several tenants of the manor at Penge in 1596, (fn. 52) but in 1725 the vicar of Battersea returned to Bishop Willis that there were only thirteen houses and sixty inhabitants in Penge, who went to Beckenham Church, and for whose care he paid a trifling consideration to the incumbent of Beckenham. (fn. 53) The whole common was inclosed under an Act of 1827. (fn. 54) There were then 320 acres already inclosed and several houses standing there. In 1853 Mr. Schuster sold his park on the summit of Penge Hill to the Crystal Palace Company for the re-erection of the gigantic building made by Sir Joseph Paxton for the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. (fn. 55) The Palace was opened by Queen Victoria in 1854. (fn. 56) In 1877, owing to financial difficulties and to the 'Greenwich fair characteristics,' which had replaced the former educational objects of the Palace, the company was reconstituted. (fn. 57) The Palace, as originally planned, was the exhibition building of glass and iron which had served for the Exhibition of 1851 in Hyde Park, re-erected on this site, with the addition of high water towers to supply the fountains in the grounds. Inside courts were erected to illustrate the arts and architecture of different periods, from the Egyptian monarchy to the Italian Renaissance, and there was a great collection of plaster casts of famous statues. (fn. 58) A School of Art and Music was established, and later a School of Forestry and Engineering, which has continued to flourish. The Palace became the chief seat of the highest class of music near London, and the Handel Festivals, under the direction of Sir Michael Costa and Sir August Manns, obtained the greatest reputation, as did the Saturday Concerts so closely associated with the names of Sir August Manns and Sir George Grove. But the public taste did not rise to this level, and the theatre and music-hall exhibitions gradually eclipsed the educational features. The grounds, of great extent, including a cricket field, football ground and a lake, continue to furnish unrivalled scope for exhibitions, excursions, games and firework or aeronautical displays. The land surrounding the Palace was sold shortly before 1875 for building purposes, and the whole site is now for sale.

1596/97 – Manor of Battersea and parts of Penge and Beckenham; TNA Reference: E 134; 38and39 Eliz I/Mich3

Oliver St. John and his wife Johanna. v. Edward Style: Manor of Battrychsey (Surrey), "waste ground and coppices called Penge," parcel of the manor, and a messuage called "Grovefield House" in defendant's occupation. Common of pasture for goats on such waste. [The names of messuages called `Thornton's," "St. Peter's Hall," "Wilmot's Haw," "Stromer's Croft," "Katefield," "Hemphaw," and the possessions of Agnes Holden, Richard Baldwin, Henry Kempsall, Robert Wood, John Bat, of Beckenham, Sir James Yarford, Knt., and his wife Dame Eliz., Humfrey Style, Knt., and his second wife Dame Eliz., and Nichs. Rookwood and Thos. Townsend, the husbands successively of Eliz., are mentioned.]: Surrey.

Henry Rydon(Roydon) d.1568 left a will leaving property he was enfeoffed of to his wife for her natural life then to his daughter Johan Harte who married firstly Thomas Holcroft having two sons and secondly Oliver St. John. The description of this document is too vague to be accurately placed, probably in the viscinity of Penge Common and requires more investigation. Either unidentified fields or names have changed. Grovefield House might be related to Groveland which is later part of Burrell/Kelsey property. Kempsall and Batt are yeomen landowners mentioned elsewhere in this history and Richard Baldwin was tenant of the Abbey Farm part of Beckenham Manor near Rockhills as shown on the 1623 Beckenham Manor map. These occupants seem to be local people who gave evidence to a commission investigating the claims of St.John. As I don’t have an Edward Style for this date in the family tree it looks like a transcription error of ‘Edmund Style (1538-1617) of Langley’. Sir James Yarford (d.1527) was the second husbad of the widowed wife Elizabeth Wolstan (d.1547) of John Stile (d.1505). The document must reference the occupation by the Styles since John Style acquired Langley circa 1500? Humphrey Style probably acquired some Abbey of Westminster property at Penge after the dissolution of the Monastries and this may be related property. Humphrey was son of John Style and Humphrey’s second wife Elizabeth Peryn remarried Thomas Townesend buth this is the first mention I’ve seen of another husband Nicholas Rookwood. The Oliver St. John here became Viscount Grandison and lived between 1559 and 1630 married to Joan Roydon and the land in question is probably that which Joan inherited from her father. He and Joan had no issue so perhaps her first husband’s heirs if any had claim on any property. A related Oliver St. John acquired one moiety of the Manor of Beckenham circa 1639. The will of Elizabeth Roydon 1591 gives more names for Holcrofts which could be children or other relatives.

Whatever the outcome of the suit, Joan St.John, who became Viscountess Grandison died in 1631 just months after her husband and her surviving son Sir Henry Holcroft was executor of her will which is so far unfound.

1598 – Muster Roll under Elizabeth I, both Grove and Muscrappe names appear in Beckenham burials, Stephen appears but John Muscrappe/Musgrove doesn’t. Muscrappe a variation of Musgrove.

1599 – The Will of Thomas Kempsall of Beckenham, Yeoman; these wills though few give a snapshot of life in the parish and illustrate the presence of smaller properties occupied by the yeoman and husbondmen (farmers) of the parish. As the records of christenings and marriages for Beckenham were damaged we rely on burial records for clues to any wills which in turn, in some cases, give details of descendants and relatives. From that we have traced several foreseeable intermarriages of local families.

The Kempsalls had a property bounded by Chancery Lane, Wickham Road, Oakwood Road and probably Overbury Avenue. It is annotated on the 1766 Foxgrove Manor map. Often the existence of small properties is evidenced only by the name of the neighbouring landowner or occupier.

Thomas’s will written in 1593 divides his property between his sons Henry and Jeremy and binds them to pay some proceeds to his other sons John and Thomas. It appears from burial records that another son Sadocke, predeceased Thomas senior. Although this will’s probate is dated to 1599 there is no record of a Thomas Kempsall being buried in St.George’s whether by omission or a transcription error in copying the registers. The repetition of names within families ie Henry, Thomas etc make it difficult to trace family trees. Nevertheless this evidences this local family from the first records in 1539 to the mid 18th Century. See 1619 for the will of Jeremy Kempsall.

1600 - Beckenham Manor (part of and a probable lease) Philipot states “to Bradbury, from which Family about the latter End of Q. Eliz.(1600) it came over by Sale to Serjeant Gent, who gave it in Dower with his Daughter to Sir George Dalston of Cumberland, who in our Memory (1630-?) conveyed it to Sir Patrick Curwin of the same County, who later sold it to Oliver St. John (1635) (source; Philipot).

But we are finding that the accounts of Philipot and Hasted treat the descent of Beckenham manor perhaps too briefly and with missed elements. No confirmation of a “Sergeant Gent” has been found. However, the issue is complicated and has confused several writers. Although Bradbury was involved with the Tyrells this part of the Manor came by a daughter, Ann of the Tyrells who married Sir John Dalston and thereby via a Dalston daughter to Henry Curwen who married Catherine Dalston and it descended to their son Patricius who sold it to Sir Oliver St. John circa 1638 (source; K.Baldwin research)

1600 – Burials in Beckenham: St. George’s from the earliest records in 1539 total about 720. We might assume that those 60 years indicate about 12 per annum i.e. 1200 burials for the century.

1603 - King James I (VI of Scotland) until 1625

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