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The History of Beckenham


this page will be regularly updated: latest update July 1st 2020 with some additions and corrections. Missing illustrations are being added. Adapted from the Beckenham Place Park timeline it will become more generalized about Beckenham as it is edited.

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Work in progress ©Malvin Mitchell and Keith Baldwin

Contents:
Introduction
Historians and Sources
Landmarks in Beckenham's History
A Fuller History Timeline
Context
Pre-History and Medieval Period

The Estates

The Manor of Beckenham
The Manor of Foxgrove
Langley Park and Farm
Kelsey
Kent House
Beckenham Place Park
Beckenham Rectory
Shortlands, Clay Hill, Clayherst (pdf)
James Scott, Scott's Lane (pdf)
Other Properties
Expanded Timeline: Earliest Records to Present Day
    1066 to 1600 Beckenham and some surrounding areas
    1601 to 1800
    1900 to 2000 Beckenham Place unless otherwise stated
A Brief Timeline

Introduction

Beckenham has been written about by almost countless historians but this account may reveal hitherto undiscovered aspects and change or challenge parts of some previous accounts. Building on our work related to Beckenham Place we found the impact of events concerning the other parts of Beckenham and nearby parts of Bromley and Lewisham were of particular interest.

For the earliest events we still rely to varying extents on the work Thomas Philipot, Villare Cantianum 1659. Edward Hasted's History and Topography of Kent 1778 and 1797. And Daniel Lysons Environs of London which certainly provided information, clues and leads. While reciting the work of these writers we also are correcting some of that material and adding information.  Some writers have found misconceptions in all of these and we try to clarify any differences with substantiating evidence from various archives. Most writers have taken the main estates and written about them separately but as the evolution of one estate was often affected by overlaps with another I have attempted to merge the accounts into a timeline which enables relating transfers of property from one owner to another.

Philipot took the Manor of Beckenham, the Manor of Foxgrove, Langley Park, and finally Kelsey or Kelseys. Hasted repeated the format adding Kent House. Lysons followed this format as well. Later writers such as Roberty Borrowman (1910) and Rob Copeland (1967) added more recent information which Inman, Tonkin, Manning and others continued. Len Hevey filled a gap of early history up to the 14th Century, citing Robert Borrowman as a post 14th C. writer but we question some of Borrowman's material obviously drawn on Hasted etc. Len Hevey focussed on the early history upto the 14th Century, Pat Manning on the Cator family as well as other publications, Copeland Inman Tonkin and others generally worked from Hasted and Lysons with added local records and reminiscences.

The timeline from the Beckenham Place Park history will form the foundation of this account but more emphasis will be put on other areas until a more comprehensive picture emerges, hopefully. Some caution has to be exercised as Beckenham had several spelling variations and which may apply to other places or people with that or similar name. Another Beckingham is in Yorkshire sometimes spelt Beckyngham. Other names are prone to spelling variations and alliases such as Brun/Brune/Bruyn and Rochelle/Rokele/Rokeley.

Research into the various people mentioned does reveal some interesting stories of intrigue which would be too lengthy to fully repeat here. A note on inernet  searching, we find that 'googling' doesn't always return a result and you have to go to various archive catalogues. Although several archives have been searched this is not exhaustive as each person or place name would have  to be searched in every archive.


The Historians and Sources

The previous writers include:

Thomas Philipot 1659 History of Kent “Villare Cantianum”,
Edward Hasted 1778 1
st edition Topography and History of Kent and 2nd edition in 1797/99,

Daniel Lysons 1796 Environs of London,

W.H.Ireland 1828 A New and Complete History of Kent,

Robert Borrowmans 1910 Beckenham Past and Present,

Rob Copeland 1967 Manors of Beckenham and other publications,

Nancy Tonkin and Eric Inman’s Beckenham circa 1990,

Len Hevey 1994 "The Early History of Beckenham" (from the Iron Age to 14th C.). A History of Shortlands and History of Elmers End.

Eric Inman’s 1995 series of articles on the History of Beckenham Place Park written for the Friends of Beckenham Place Park, and "Beckenham" co-written with Nancy Tonkin

Pat Manning 2000 Cators of Beckenham and Woodbastwick and other publications on Rivers, Churchyard memorials, etc.,

Some if not all of these writers drew, as we do, on the works of their predecessors and contemporaries. Hasted refers to Philipott, Lysons to Hasted, etc. Sometimes fiction is written as fact such as we believe some assumptions referred to later in this account. But I also indulge in a few speculative scenarios based on available evidence. However, some discoveries and corrections by one writer did not get picked up in other contemporary or later publications.

Some material in Bromley Historic Collections and county archives was at some time derived from other archives such as the British Library. Our rediscovery of some of this material has contributed toward our reassessments of the various aspects of  Beckenham's History. Although some of the above writers knew of this material they may not have been so focussed on specific areas or timeslots in order to analyse the content. The archive catalogues searched include: The British Library, The National Archive, National Library of Scotland (maps), Bromley Historic Collections, Surrey Archive, West Sussex Archive. Some archives do not have an online catalogue i.e. Lewisham, Lincolnshire, etc. where we know some records are stored. 

Recently (May,2020) we have acquired a copy of Len Hevey's Early History of Beckenham which confirms some of our findings from independant research and also contains additional material which will incorporate into the timeline

The Internet has also revealed sources as books become available in e-book form and various archives become electronically indexed. Google books and other versions include: Philipott’s, Hasted’s, Lyson’s, and Ireland’s histories, Collinson’s letters, Memorial of Humphrey Marshall and John Bartram, Life of Dr. Johnson, Hester Thrale, Lady D’Arblay, Memoirs of George IV and Memoirs of William IV, etc. Beckenham History and Bromley Borough Local History Society websites contain material. Some of this we would question but for the most part it contributes valuable information and personal recollections.

We aim to represent as accurately as possible the evolution of the town of Beckenham and its environs. Dated estate plans in the British Library, Kent Archive and Bromley Historic Collections have enabled the analysis of landholdings by landlords at specific dates. This has allowed for discovering detail which is not in the earlier written records.  I doubt we will be able to relate everything in a fully comprehendable manner as the chain of events and occupation is not complete. Just as today it would be difficult to relate all transfers of property it is even more difficult from old archives. The small windows we have on the past add some colour to events.

I certainly started by accepting the previous accounts of others, but where prior information is proved to be wrong or doubtful we draw attention to it here. I say 'we' as I am reliant on leads and information from a fellow researcher Keith Baldwin.  I should add that we are not attempting to entirely replace former accounts which all have a lot of information to offer.

Landmarks in Beckenham's History

1086 Recorded in the Domesday Book

1345 Lay Subsidy Roll of taxation

1623 Map of Beckenham Manor (only survives as a 1768 copy)

1659 Thomas Philipott's Villare Cantianum, History of Kent published

1688 Kelsey is bought by Peter Burrell I

1712 Francis Leigh of Foxgrove dies, it passes by sale to Tolson

1720 Map of Foxgrove Manor (only survives as a later copy 1766)

1723 and 1735 Maps of Burrell's Kelsey estate

1732 Hugh Raymond buys Langley and  Simpsons Place

1735 a Map of Langley (referred to in archive and copied later 19th C)

1740/50 Jones Raymond's Map of the Southern part of Langley Place

1745 John Rocque produces a map of London and surrounding area which shows a ‘messuage’ on Stumpshill, described as Stoms Hill on his map.

1760 (circa) John Cator acquires the site of Beckenham Place Park mansion and some other fields in the Manor of Foxgrove and builds a fine stately house by 1762.

1766 redrawn map of Foxgrove Manor

1768 redrawn map of Beckenham Manor

1769 Andrews, Drury and Herbert’s map shows a house with a similar footprint to the current mansion on the site of the Rocque ‘messuage’

1773 John Cator buys the Manor of Beckenham from Viscount Bolingbroke but the purchase is fraught with problems until 1780, very little of Manor of Beckenham land becomes or remains part of Beckenham Place Park.

1777 John Cator exchanges fields called Pill Crofts and Hop Ground adjoining his Stumps Hill house property from Amy Burrell, widow of Peter Burrell II

1785 John Cator closes roads crossing his estate and diverts the Beckenham to Southend road enclosing (enparking) his ‘park’. The lake may have been constructed at this time.

1793 John Cator exchanges land with Peter Burrell IV, Lord Gwydir to consolidate his estate this may have had some impact on the size of the ‘Park’

1799 An Ordnance Survey map drawing shows Bromley  and Beckenham

1806 John Cator dies and his nephew John Barwell Cator inherits the Cator estates

1809 A map and estate book of the Burrell estates of Kelsey and Langley.

1820 Sir Peter Burrell, Lord Gwydir dies and the Beckenham estates of the Burrells of Langley, Kelsey and parts of Beckenham and Foxgrove Manors are sold.

1825 John Barwell Cator and trustees in the Cator family acquire a Private Act of Parliament which allows changes to the estates

1840 to 1927 A series of tenants occupy Beckenham Place

1927 – The London County Council decides to buy Beckenham Place Park from the Cator Estate.

1929 – Beckenham Place Park Opened as a Public Park

1972 – Ownership of Beckenham Place Park passed to London Borough of Lewisham from the GLC

A Fuller History of Beckenham

Perhaps there is an imbalance in history accounts as they focus on more high profile personalities because their records are more easily found. Here we focus first on the places and then the people who passed through. The deeper we delve into detail then the more complex it becomes so some generalisations will be inevitable. Previous writers have tended to write about the main estates: Manor of Beckenham, Manor of Foxgrove, Langley estate and Kelsey estate. Then some histories consist of personal reminiscencies. Not much is known of events the further back we go but some individuals had connections with national events. If these are relevant I will include them. We have delved into various archives via online catalogues but only scratched the surface in many respects. But this has added some substance to the account. Various errors and potential errors have been found in most accounts and If any are noticed in this please bring it to our attention.

Context

This account  may focus largely on the early history of Beckenham which is more of a mystery. The later and recent history has probably been adequately covered in various publications, not least those of Rob Copeland, Patricia Manning, Eric Inman  et al.
Maybe Beckenham has always been a bit of a backwater as it isn't on a major road to anywhere and this might have retarded its urbanization for longer than nearby places on major roads.
The A21 and A22 byepass it and radial routes  such as the South Circular and A232 pass north and south of it. A Roman road which is said to have passed through the area has not survived as a noticeable local road.
However some notable personages resided in and around Beckenham from Lords Mayor of London, Aldermen, Large Landowners and Knights or Peers of the Realm.

There were a few large landowners with tenant farmers and workers, also, some smallholdings and private houses, some of which were described as mansions or great houses. With a small population recorded as 1,000 in 1801 which rose to 26,000 in 1901 development was slow. The large landowners were either long term family inheritors or people who had purchased estates as a means of ‘banking’ their wealth. However, the estates did change hands fairly regularly and the landowners’ names are also associated with estates elsewhere so Beckenham was not by any means a sole family seat for many or even any. The long term landowners included the Leighs of Addington who inherited Foxgrove Manor, the St. Johns/Lords Bolingbrokes of Beckenham Manor who’s main base was in Battersea, the Brograves of Kelsey and the Styles of Langley. The Burrells arrived in the late 17th Century and the Raymonds in 1732. Wealth accumulated from business was often invested in land purchase which in turn generated rents and other income.  The Cators  made their presence felt from the mid 18th C and other names of note were  Lethieullier, Brett,  Motley, Austin,  Hoare, Eden.

Often the absence of an heir led to sale of estates as with the Styles of Langley whose female heiress married into the Elwills who then sold to Hugh Raymond, or heirs favoured other places and sold their Beckenham property as with Frederick St. John/Lord Bolingbroke in 1773 and the Burrells in 1820 after the death of Peter Burrell/Baron Gwydir, and the Cators gradually from about 1808. More than one landlord needed to sell estates to pay off debts as with the heirs of Francis Leigh of Hawley who owned Foxgrove at his death. The histories written by Thomas Philipot (1659) and Edward Hasted (1778 and 1797) relate the chain of exchange of ownership but these also miss some fine detail. Other significant landowners were the Tolsons, Motleys, Austins, Pughs, Willis, Humphrey and Lethieulliers. Maps and land deeds discovered show the patchwork of fields and estates with ownership almost jumbled in some cases. Large estates were divided into farms with for example Langley being divided into 4 or 5 farms with all but one being leased to tenants. In 1737 Thayers Farm and Elmers End Old and New Farms were owned by Thomas Motley who also owned a fine house and grounds in Beckenham village. Around this time the Lethieulliers owned Kent House Farm and the site of Clockhouse. A few generations later and the land was either left or sold to others.

We find common links with the South Sea Company or East India Company, sometimes both. These were sources of income and wielded significant power. Often the landowners were members of parliament not necessarily for Beckenham but for other areas ie the Burrells for Haslemere and Boston and Cator for Wallingford and Stockbridge. Being a member of parliament and a member of the South Sea or East India Company enabled them to influence decisions in favour of their interests. Some smaller land or property owners had businesses such as Dying and Tanning in London or Southwark, just as the Cators would start with a timber business. It is surprising how many landowners were in the legal profession and held administrative posts from Sherrif to Justice of the Peace. In the medieval period several knights were close to the crown from whom they derived their property and power.

Each century had its periods of turmoil both domestically and internationally which often impacted local affairs from the Wars of the Roses, The English Civil War, the Great Plague, the Restoration of the Monarchy, wars between Britain and France, such as the War of the Spanish Succession, The 7 Years War, The war of American Independence and the later Napoleonic Wars. The social conditions bordered on the barbaric both domestically and internationally. Felons could be transported to the Americas up to the time of the American Revolution and to Australia thereafter or hung for quite minor offences. The working class, poor and slaves were all treated harshly. Felons could be transported into slavery and apprentices were indentured for 7 or more years into a situation of ownership by their masters. The two World Wars affected the population with the loss of life among soldiers in the First World War, and both soldiers and civilians in the Second World War. In WW1 several buildings were used by the military and in WWII bomb damage was significant in the Borough and at least 2 POW camps were established which themselves narrowly missed being hit by bombs.

Religion has not left any visible  signs of turmoil although the parish church would have been Catholic prior to Henry VIII's split from Rome. Though some claims have been made that dissenters such as the Cators as Quakers suffered persecution, that persecution often was only in the form of fines for not attending the recognized Church of England or for not paying tythes or taxes and it seems that the nonconformists could in most cases afford the fines levied upon them.

The Law played its  part in various land processes as the Court of Chancery commonly has records of disputes and settlements regarding Beckenham properties. Some comparisons brought up by this account show that Bolingbroke entered into a subterfuge with Cator amounting to thousands of pounds with no penalty whereas someone stealing a couple of window frames was transported for 7 years and others sentenced to death for theft of low value goods. Earlier in 1720 several notable persons committed large frauds and embezzlements under the South Sea Bubble affair and in most cases quite minor financial penalties were applied.

Beckenham was one of many places easily in reach of London but away from the pollution and dirt of the City and hence a place to have a country house. Admiral Sir Piercy Brett moved into Clockhouse in the mid 18th Century and John Cator’s brother Joseph moved in after Brett’s death in 1882. The village had large houses such as The Mead, The Ridge, Beckenham Lodge, The Manor House and a substantial Rectory. The mid to late 19th century saw the building of large villas with coach houses and stables.

Frederick St. John (Lord Bolingbroke) had married Diana Spencer but his debts and subsequent broken marriage led him to dispose of estates in Battersea and Beckenham.

Investing money in a landed estate which brought in rents from tenant farmers and house rents was akin to ‘buy to let’ as it is carried on today. Even the middle class and aristocracy often rented property as opposed to buying it. Many documents relate to leases of property although in isolation they may be seen as transfers one release of property is later reversed by a return of the property to the original holder. For example the Bruyns Beckenham Manor fell under the influence of Robert de Marny as he married the widowed Alice Bruyn, then it was transferred to the local rector or clergyman, Martham, only to be returned to the Bruyns under Ingram Bruyn. The reasons for these transfers is mostly unknown but basically financial.

For some background I would recommend ‘London Life in the Eighteenth Century’ by M.Dorothy George, which is probably out of print, as being well researched and probably used since as source material by other authors.

Pre-history to the Medieval Period

Evidence in the landscape shows that geologically the area was under a shallow sea 54 million years ago in the Eocene period as in some areas the Blackheath Beds or Harwich Formation of shingle emerge through the London Clay. In one area of Beckenham Place Park there is an exposed conglomerate (concretion) of the Blackheath Beds which is shingle cemented together with lime and sand. In other areas the London Clay is on the surface covered with a thin layer of topsoil being leaf mould, loam or silt deposits. Some valleys have accumulations of silts forming meads and meadows. The geology would affect the later use of the land and economy. Clay soil has always been difficult to work for crops so often left for grazing or woodland. Valley silts and loams were probably favoured for arable farming. Locally there have been brick fields utilising clay and sand, gravel pits and lime kilns all using the natural resources laid down geologically. The nature of the ground would affect the economy as some land was poor for agriculture such as Penge Common. Clay areas and woodland were  a major source of fuel and building material. There are a few references to lime kilns which would need both chalk and woodland fuel for the improvement of soil. At least one lease agreement requires the lessee to manure and lime the land regularly. One landowner is recorded as providing timber for naval dockyards circa 1680. The Chalk is mostly several metres below the surface but the existence of lime kiln fields indicates that some chalk was available, maybe coming from the Chislehurst Caves or similar places where chalk is nearer the surface.

During the Mesolithic, Bronze and Iron ages there was probably occupation as although not much  by way of  definite remains but some have been found. There are hill forts and earthworks within walking distance at Keston, Halsted and Westerham, also some mention of flint tools found near West Wickham. An overview of this period can be drawn from Len Hevey's "Early History of Beckenham".

During the Roman occupation of Britain a road passed through the Beckenham area en route from Lewes in Sussex to Londinium. Though no hard evidence has been found in the park or close by it is projected by some experts that the road cut across the corner of Beckenham Place Park near the Foxgrove Road Lodge at the junction of Foxgrove Road and Southend Road. Different projections for the route of the road exist and as Beckenham has been redeveloped several times I would have thought more evidence would have surfaced, literally. Also, althought the road deviated to cross the north downs it is projected to have gone straight up Spring Park at West Wickham which would have been a challenge for loaded horse drawn carts of Roman goods. The suggested area is now outside the public park and under an area of private housing. Roman remains exist not far away at Keston, Titsey and Orpington. In the area where the roman road is projected to have crossed the park before the park was established there was a quarry or gravel pit and a lane called Limekiln Lane maybe indicating that there were lime rich deposits or chalk here. Whether these were part of the Blackheath Bed conglomerate or underlying Chalk near the surface we cannot say. I’m told the chalk would be about 100 feet/30metres below the surface. As much of Beckenham has been redeveloped more than once it is curious that no historic remains have been found. The Roman road structure was said to have been mainly gravel and as the area is largely of gravel composition then over time the road may have fallen into disrepair, the course became obscured and diversions created around areas which may have become impassable. Also we have to consider the local waterways, although not considerable, would have required crossing with bridges or fords and this may have caused the road to deviate from the accepted Roman practice of building straight roads wherever practical. One source suggests the road crossed what is now Langley Park Golf course and may have gone through Kelsey Park. Some local roads though not straight do approximately follow these lines. Various landlords had roads diverted around their estates and the various stages of settlement and farming could have erased or buried many features. The course of the road is plain to see through Edenbridge and several other places but does not seem to have survived in any form through Beckenham.

Unfortunately, very little survives locally of any Ango-Saxon, Medieval, Tudor etc. One of the oldest structures is the lych gate of the church and that’s a bit like Trigger’s broom, 3 new heads and 2 new handles! It is said that parts of the Old Manor house survive in the facade and interior of the building there opposite the church which is now a restaurant. Even the church was rebuilt in the Victorian period after fire damaged the previous medieval incarnation but some old memorials remain. The Alms houses next to the church and the George Inn are dated to the 17th century. The Anglo-Saxon administration survives in the old maps as the Park is in the Hundred of Bromley and Beckenham which is in the bailiwick or Lathe of Sutton at Hone. We do have recourse to documentary evidence about Beckenham and surrounding areas in various archives certainly from the Domesday entry and documents related to land transfers and taxation. These will be inserted into the timeline where available or discovered. Thanks to Keith Baldwin for diligent research here.The Black Death introduced the bubonic plague here in the 14th Century and fairly regular outbreaks occurred which impacted the population. Other diseases such as smallpox, diptheria, measles etc were also serious and these kept the population in check regardless of wealth.

The works of Thomas Philipot and Edward Hasted revealed an ever changing web of ownership, intermarriage, selling and transfer of properties all over Kent. In some cases estates were handed out by the Crown only to be seized again when some misdemeanour took place e.g. The Boleyn’s having Hever confiscated by Henry VIII after Anne Boleyn’s alleged adultery. And later, The St. Johns had a chequered history, with one being excluded from Parliament on the Restoration of Charles II, Another being convicted of murder but a pardon purchased from the Crown, Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke may or may not have been a landlord of Beckenham Manor, but he was attained for treason for supporting the Jacobites, exiled in France for some time and subsequently had his properties and titles restored to him which some might say was lucky for him. He however died without issue. Frederick St. John who sold the Manor of Beckenham lands to John Cator had a failed marriage with Diana Spencer and seems to have dissipated the St.John estates  almost single handedly. The manors and estates around Beckenham had complex histories which is explained in the following timeline.

The Reverend William Rose had a Georgian rectory built to an Adam Brother's design but that gave way to a town hall and now a branch of Marks and Spencer and its car park which cover the site. He also had designed if not built a sumptuous stables as he appears to have been a keen horseman at a time when horses were the equivalent of fast cars.

Perhaps the George public house in the high street is the oldest most complete structure locally and that passed through the hands of the Cator Estate and is listed in the 1825 Act properties along with the Crooked Billet in Penge.

Those are some of the unknowns which await discovery of firm evidence.


The Estates
Early writers recorded Beckenham by referring to its major landowners and estates divided into Beckenham Manor, Foxgrove Manor, Kelsey and Langley. Kent House Farm was recorded by at least one writer. If one takes the names of the landlords and searches for instance Philipot or Hasted's accounts we find that most landlords held divers properties often in several counties. Also, Philipot and Hasted as well as contemporaries and later writers were almost producing directories of landlords, their estates, lineages and locations. Along with the maps of Rocque and Andrews, Drury, Herbert these formed a who's who of Kent. I'll quote Philipot's and Hasted's passages but then I'll divide them into their relevant timeslots on the timeline. Hopefully this will put things into context and demonstrate which events were contemporary with one another. It will also correct or dispute some of their statements based on rediscovered evidence and the substantiated accounts by others. Along the way we see several Court of Chancery cases dealing with property issues which arose through inheritance, sales and the contesting of wills. We have added whatever documents we can find acknowledging the work of divers people who have transcribed documents, produced indexes and directories over the years and the subsequent transferring of data onto the internet. Some documents confuse matters as they imply land was transferred permanently but is subsequently returned to or reclaimed by the original owner rendering the document as a lease rather than a freehold transfer. As all property was held by grant from the crown then in some cases reclamation by the crown deprived the landlord of ownership.
Apart from these major estates the other properties varied in size sometimes being swallowed up by the larger landlords. It bears repeating that the landholdings were interwoven by complex ownership of sometimes individual fields quite distant from the landlords base. Apart from a few insights we can't fully trace the occupancy of land as many landlords had tenants to manage farms. A map of Langley circa 1740-50 records some tenants and surrounding landowners and an estate book of 1809 of the Burrell etates shows leased occupancy. Material exists for the Cator estate circa 1860 through maps and records. Probably the full picture would hold so much munitiae as to be uninteresting but we will try to show a more comprehensive picture than hitherto published.
Dickens probably got his Jarndice versus Jarndice idea from some of these events in the same way that Jane Austen used her experiences of her extended family for her novels.

The Manor of Beckenham
This Manor has a complicated history because of its transfers of ownership and division into two moieties or parts under the two Bruyn daughters and a subsequent rejoining by purchases of the St.Johns circa1635-1650. Philipot even indicates that one moiety was divided further between Henry Parke and Ralph Warren but that is assumed by Lysons to be related to loans or morgages. A comparison of Philipot, Hasted and Lysons reveals several differences and some modern day sources also bring some of their details into question ie Isolde (Rokeley) is now thought to be of unknown family and Maude de Rokeley is the probable heiress who brought the Beckenham Manor into the Bruyn/Brun family.  The Manor lands were also spread and divided geographically from near Beckenham Parish Church St. George's up to Rockhills which is now Crystal Palace Parade with other isolated fields and messuages. As Kelsey is thought to emerge as land acquired from the Bruyns it is certainly possible that Kelsey was once part of Beckenham Manor as it lies between the two parts or moieties and other dismembered parts of Beckenham Manor. The Manor does not appear to be a primary residence of any of its landlords, probably being leased or let for much of its existence. The Bruyn's apparently favoured Essex, The St.Johns based in Battersea, maybe members of the extended families resided at Beckenham? Certainly most of the landlords had other residences.We are also dependant upon the translations from Latin of early documents. Research is revealing that the descent of the  manor via the Bruyns was complex and involved with several other manors in Essex, Hampshire and elsewhere. Although Beckenham Manor may not have featured very highly in state affairs it was connected with several events through its owners. Various disputes about ownership drew in several families. de Marny more or less seized ownership from the Bruyns after marrying the widow on one Maurice Bruyn and later William Brandon did the same after marrying Elizabeth, one of the daughters of Henry Bruyn. Some of these protagonists were close to the crown  and held hight positions. Sometimes falling foul of the crown and being attained for treason as with William Brandon under Richard III and Walter St.John under William and Mary.

Philipott says:
(dates inserted might be a year difference)

Bekenham near Bromley helps to give Name to the Hundred wherein it is placed, and of old time was held by Gentlemen, called in Latine Records de Rupella, in French de la Rochel, and in English Rokeley, and were in their original Etymologie extracted from Rochel in France, Richard de Rokeley died seised of this Mannor, in the fifth year of Edward the first,(1276) and was succeeded in the Possession by Philip de la Rokeley, and he held it likewise at his Death, which hapened in the 23 year of Edw. the first,(1295) and left it to his Sole Daughter and Heir Isolda de la Rokeley matched to William Bruin, by whom She had Issue Sir Maurice Bruin, Chamberlaine to K. Edw. the third, honoured with the Summons to Parliament as Baron amongst the Peers of this Realm, who by a Right derived to him from his Mother, was possest of this at his Death, in the twenty ninth of Edward the third,(1356) and transmitted a wide and spreading Revenue to his Posterity here, at Southokenden in Essex, and at Roumere in Hantshire, which last was given in Appendage to a younger Son, from whom the Bruins of Athelhampton in the County of Dorset, are lineally de∣scended. But when after a fair continuance this Family had flourished at this Place, the Distaffe prevailed against the Speare, and Sir Henry Bruins two Daughters and Coheirs about the Beginning of Edward the fourth (1461), divided his Inheritance, each of them having a first and second Husband: Alice the eldest was first married to Robert Harleston of Essex Esquire, and after to Sir Thomas Heveningham; and Elizabeth second Daughter was wedded first to Thomas Tirrell of Heron in Essex Esquire, and after his Decease to Sir William Brandon Knight, who was Standard-bearer to Henry the seventh at Bosworth Field,(1485) where he was slain in asserting his Cause and Quarrel against Richard the third, and he had Issue by her Sir Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk (1484), the Flower and perfection of English Chivalrie in his Time, who sometimes kept his Residence at this place, (not as Proprietarie, but onely as Lessee, for the Sole Inheritance upon the Division of Bruin's Estate accrued to Tirrell;) and here entertained Henry the eighth, with all the Cunning Pompe of Magnificence, as he went to bestow a Visit at Hever, on his discarded, and repudiated wife Ann of Cleve (1540-45). But to go on, this Mannor as I said before, being annexed to the patrimony of Thomas Tirrell, Humphrey Tirrell his Grandchild to whom it descended, passed away one Moietie of it in the thirty fifth year of Henry the eighth (1543) to Ralph Warren, and the other to Henry Parke; Warren alienated his Proportion not long after to Bradbury, from which Family about the latter End of Q. Eliz.(1603) it came over by Sale to Serjeant Gent, who gave it in Dower with his Daughter to Sir George Dalston of Cumberland,(married 11 Feb. 1605, Catherine (bur. 22 July 1614), da. of John Tamworth of Halsted, Leics.) (History of Parliament online) who in our Memory conveyed it to Sir Patrick Curwin of the same County, and he some few years since sold his Interest in it to Sir Oliver St. John of Batricksey in Surrey,(abt 1635) who upon his Decease (1639) gave it to his Son then Mr. Walter, but now upon the Death of his Nephew (1657), Sir Walter St. John Baronet, the other Moitie by Joan sole Heir of the abovesaid Henry Parke, came to be the Inheritance of Mr. Robert Leigh descended out of Cheshire, whose Successor about the latter End of King James (1625) alienated it to Sir Henry Snelgrave, from whom it descended to his Grandchild Mr. Henry Snelgrave, who not long since passed it away (1648 to the Evelyn brothers then in 1651) to Mr. Walter, now Sir Walter St. John Baronet, who lately hath exchanged the whole Mannor, for other Land with his Brother Mr. Henry St. John.



What can we add?
Hasted's account differs in several aspects maybe extending and correcting Philipot? It can be found at https://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-kent/vol1/pp527-550
The situation surrounding the division of the manor requires some explanation not least in which parts were the manor divided. One record describes the widow of Bruyn holding one third of the manor which may then have been divided between the two daughters. Philipot describes the two Bruyn daughters as having two husbands each while Hasted describes three each. Other writers put the husbands in different orders. Philipot describes Dalston marrying a daughter of Sergeant Gent whereas Hasted and History of Parliarment state he married a daughter or sister of Thomas Tyrrel/Tirrel. In 1639 Henry Snellgrave died in Beckenham and is buried in St. George's. His will mentions several properties
In 1648 and 1651 There are records in Surrey Archive for transfers of money and property between Henry Snellgrave (Grandson of Sir Henry) and Richard, George and  John Evelyn the famous diarist. The Evelyns subsequently sold this part in 1750
to two St. John brothers Walter and Henry. Sir Oliver St. John's part was left to his son, John who died young and it became the property of Walter St. John his uncle who also aquired the baronet title. It descended to Frederick St. John who exchanged the manor house and Court Downs for Woolseys Farm with Peter Burrell in 1757 and sold the rest to John Cator in 1773, but that is a simplification of events which will be explained in the timeline. The map of 1623 copied in 1768 is the best illustration we have of the complexity of the Beckenham Manor properties.
There is certainly more to discover or explain.
And Lysons writes "

The manor of Beckenham was held of King Edward the Consessor, by Anschil. When the survey of Doomsday was taken, Ansgot, of Rochester, held it under Odo, Bishop of Baieux. Richard de la Rokele died seised of it in 1276. His son Philip left a daughter and sole heir, Isolda, married to Sir William Bruyn; from whom this manor descended to Sir Henry Bruyn, who died in 1461, leaving two daughters, coheirs (fn. 5). Alice the eldest had, by her first husband John Berners, Esq. a son, who died without issue; upon which, a moiety of this manor was inherited by John Harlefton, son of her second husband. Clement Harleston sold it, in 1530, to Robert Legh, Esq. (fn. 7), whose descendant of the same name, in 1610, aliened it to Henry Snelgar, or Snelgrave, Esq. (fn. 8) (afterwards knighted). About the year 1650, it was sold, by his grandson Henry Snelgrave, Esq. to Walter St. John, Esq. (fn. 9), in whose family the manor became again united.—Elizabeth, second daughter of Sir Henry Bruyn, married, to her first husband (fn. 10), Thomas Tyrrell, Esq. whose descendants inherited the other moiety of this manor; one of them, whose name also was Thomas, left a daughter and sole heir, married to Sir John Dalston, by whom she had two daughters. Catherine, one of these coheirs, married Sir Henry Curwen (fn. 11). About the year 1650, Sir Patrick Curwen, his son, sold a moiety of the manor of Beckenham to Oliver St. John, Esq. (fn. 12); from whom it came to Sir Walter St. John, Bart. already possessed of the other moiety. The manor, thus united, continued in the St. John family till the year 1773, when Frederick, the late Viscount Bolingbroke, sold it to John Cator, Esq. (fn. 13), the present proprietor, who resides in an elegant mansion, which he built soon after his purchase of the estate, and called Beckenham-place. It stands on an eminence, and commands a beautiful, though not a very extensive prospect."

But the jury remains 'out' on these early assessments as the 'de la Rokeles', Rokell or Rokeleys are thought to have descended via Maud de la Rokeley/Rokele married to Sir Maurice le Brun/le Brune/Bruyn. Isolde was married to Maurice's father William le Brun and no one knows her family name but she is described as of the 'House of Queen Eleanor' as a Maid of Honour (source: Sir John Maclean 1876). Another name attributed to Philip de la Rokele is Philip de Rupellis. As well as the manor of Beckenham, Matilda carried the manor of Okendon in Essex to the Brun family. The biography of Maurice le Brune would indicate very little direct contact with Beckenham except as landlord so leases and tenants would be of more interest. Manors with alternative names such as Wokyndon Rokell or South Wokyndon are mentioned and Hasted connects Rokele with several Kent manors.
Later we find that Maurice le Bruyn married to Alice le Lacer assigned his property to Robert de Marney, de Marney later married Alice when she was widowed and de Marney had a reputation for riding rough shod over anyone connected with him. See History of Parliament for his entry which describes his ruthless nature. But Beckenham Manor and other land return to Ingram Bruyn and his heirs circa 1400.
We take issue with several details of both Philipot and Hasted such as the omission of the manor passing through the hands of the Evelyns although briefly and detail about Cator's aquisition is wrong in several respects.

Lysons in his Environs of London in a very brief summary states:
The manor of Beckenham was held of King Edward the Confessor, by Anschil. When the survey of Doomsday was taken (fn. 1), Ansgot, of Rochester, held it under Odo, Bishop of Baieux. Richard de la Rokele died seised of it in 1276 (fn. 2). His son Philip left a daughter and sole heir, Isolda (fn. 3), married to Sir William Bruyn; from whom this manor descended (fn. 4) to Sir Henry Bruyn, who died in 1461, leaving two daughters, coheirs (fn. 5). Alice the eldest had, by her first husband John Berners, Esq. a son, who died without issue; upon which, a moiety of this manor was inherited by John Harlefton, son of her second husband (fn. 6). Clement Harleston sold it, in 1530, to Robert Legh, Esq. (fn. 7), whose descendant of the same name, in 1610, aliened it to Henry Snelgar, or Snelgrave, Esq. (fn. 8) (afterwards knighted). About the year 1650, it was sold, by his grandson Henry Snelgrave, Esq. to Walter St. John, Esq. (fn. 9), in whose family the manor became again united.—Elizabeth, second daughter of Sir Henry Bruyn, married, to her first husband (fn. 10), Thomas Tyrrell, Esq. whose descendants inherited the other moiety of this manor; one of them, whose name also was Thomas, left a daughter and sole heir, married to Sir John Dalston, by whom she had two daughters. Catherine, one of these coheirs, married Sir Henry Curwen (fn. 11). About the year 1650, Sir Patrick Curwen, his son, sold a moiety of the manor of Beckenham to Oliver St. John, Esq. (fn. 12); from whom it came to Sir Walter St. John, Bart. already possessed of the other moiety. The manor, thus united, continued in the St. John family till the year 1773, when Frederick, the late Viscount Bolingbroke, sold it to John Cator, Esq. (fn. 13), the present proprietor, who resides in an elegant mansion, which he built soon after his purchase of the estate, and called Beckenham-place. It stands on an eminence, and commands a beautiful, though not a very extensive prospect.

And from this we can find Robert Leigh the elder dying in 1567 and buried at St.George's Beckenham and trace his descendants through Nicholas Leigh to the next Robert Leigh.  Some dates by Lyson are estimates. some information incorrect from other sources and we have found more accurate and supplementary information in the timeline.

The Manor of Foxgrove

Here follows Philipott’s account  with original spellings (f for s etc.). He starts with a reference to John de Foxgrove about 1347. The Lay Subsidy Roll of land taxation for 1334 shows a John Foxsegrove under the Lathe of Eyllesford (Aylesford) but not the Hundred of Beckenham. Whether even at that time Foxgrove was under absentee landlords has not as yet been established. I have inserted dates in the following based on Philipott’s timeline references to monarchs.  Like  all the manors and estates of Beckenham Foxgrove was widely spread and divided, centred upon Foxgrove  Manor farmhouse but reaching  beyond Kelsey and Langley to West Wickham,  almost to Southend, Lewisham with parts  at Plaistow, Bromley.

Foxgrove is the last place of Account in this Parish, it had in elder times Proprietaries of this Sirname; for I find John de Foxgrove paid respective Aid for it in the twentieth year of Edward the third (1347), at making the Black Prince Knight. After this Family succeeded Bartholomew Lord Burwash, and he held it at his Decease, which was in the twenty ninth year of Edward the third (1356). and from him it descended to his Son Bartholomew Lord Burwash, who in the forty third year of the abovesaid Prince (1370), passed it away to Sir Walter de Paveley, and in his Family it remained untill the latter End of Richard the second, (1399) and then it was conveyed to Vaux of the County of North-Hampton, and there made its abode untill the latter End of Henry the sixth (1461), and then it was alienated to John Grene Esquire, and he died possest of it in fourth year of Edward the fourth (1465); and in this Family did the Title reside, untill the Beginning of Henry the eighth (1509), and then it was demised to Beversea, and Humphrey Beversea, I find held it in the eighteenth year of Henry the eighth (1527), and his Descendant passed it away to Luke Hollingworth, and he about the Beginning of K. Edward the sixth (1547), sold his Interest in it to Alderman Sir Jo. Oliff of London, and he dying (1577) without Issue Male, Joan(his daughter) matched (1563)to John Leigh of Addington Esquire, was his sole Heir (1577), and in Right of this Alliance, did it come down to Sir Francis Leigh (d.1644) late of East-Wickham; whose Widow Dowager the Lady Christian Leigh, is now in Possession of it.(1659 she died in 1660)…….end of quote.


Subsequent to this, as Hasted recounts, Francis Leigh 1651-1711 directed that Foxgrove and other land at Plaistow be sold by his Will. Hence, John Tolson bought the land, and it descended by complicated means to his nephew, Lancelot Tolson Tilly. But we find Hasted's account to be either inaccurate or too brief. The will of Francis Leigh and subsequent events arrive at a different conclusion.

What further detail can we add? The Burghersh/Burwash family held wide ranging properties. Similar to Beckenham Manor the owners may not have been locally resident. Where documents are discovered they are recorded in the timeline. John Grene appears as a local lawyer/sheriff/escheator. We can trace the family tree of Sir John Oliff through his daughter Joan and down through the Leigh family. Francis Leigh's will of 1711 did not specifically say to sell the estate but the executors he named did not deal with the probate and his wife Frances Leigh was awarded probate. Francis directed that his bequests and debts be settled and any remaining property be passed to his son also named Frances. A Court of Chancery case of 1716 directed that Foxgrove be sold to pay his creditors and this raises a question as to whether Foxgrove passed to John Tolson in 1712/13 or later to his brother Lancelot Tolson of Plaistow(Bromley). John Tolson died in 1713 perhaps before Foxgrove was sold. Lancelot Tolson left Foxgrove to his nephew, Lancelot Tolson Tilly who dying young, left it to his parents who in turn left it in parts to Lancelot Tolson Tilly’s widow Elizabeth who in her turn left her part to Joseph Grove her uncle. Another part was left to Deborah Brydges (married to Reverend Edward Timewell) and eitheer a third part to John and Edward Brydges or they would inherit if Deborah Brydges died without issue. The timeline will explain more fully. For those interested in genealogy it’s a complex story and this branch of the Leigh family is connected but different to the branch at Addington. The wills and bequests of the Tillys certainly confuse me and I am discussing the processes with another researcher. It remains the case that some land acquisitions of John Cator cannot be dated other than by his assets listed in the 1825 Private Act of Parliament.
Today the Manor of Foxgrove is covered by Beckenham Place Park perhapse accounting for about 150 acres and the remainder in built development and Foxgrove Cricket and Tennis club.


Langley Place or Park and Farm

Langley lies astride the parish boundary between Beckenham and West Wickham. West Wickham in early times was just called Wickham but to differentiate more definitely from East Wickham near Bexley the 'West' seems to have been added. Perhaps because one local family, the Leighs, were of East Wickham as well.

Philipot said of Langley:  Langley in this Parish is a second Seat of eminent Account, which was in elder Times the Possession of John de Malmains, who obtained a Charter of Free-Warren to his Lands in Bekenham, in the twelfth year of Edward the second,(1319) which was renewed to Henry de Cliffe, to whom they accrued by Purchase from Malmains, in the third year of Edward the third;(1330) but stayed not long in the Tenure of this Fa∣mily, for before the going out of Edward the third,(1377) I find the Propriety invested by Sale in Langley, to which Family the Foundation of that House owes in part its Original, on which they ingraffed their own Name, which hath flourished under that Title ever since, though the Family be withered away and gone, the last of which Name at this place was Ralph Langley, who with Roger Twisden, Stephen Monins, Edward Monins, John Edingham or Engham, Richard Edingham, John Berton of Cotman∣ton in Shouldon, John Berham, John Betenham of Shurland in Pluckley, and others, Gentlemen of prime Rank in this County, were summoned to appear before Robert Poynings and John Perry, in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth,(1434) to disclaim the Title of the House of York, and this Ralph died in the year 1451, and ordered Langley and other demeasns at Bekenham to be sold for the discharging his Debts, the purport and Effects of which Will were accordingly performed, and his Estate at Bekenham and Langley, passed away by Sale to John Violett, whose Successors enjoyed it until the Be∣ginning of Hen. the eighth,(1509) and then it was conveyed to John Stiles Esq; who much inlarged the House with a supply of Buildings, and from him is it by Descent devolved to be the instant Possession of his Successor Sir Humphrey Stiles Knight and Baronet.(d1552)

Hasted said a bit more about Langley  but it can be confused with Langley near Maidstone but we find that the Domesday entry which Hasted quotes with the  mention of a fishery relates to Seal near Sevenoaks and the fishery must be on the river Darenth or consisting of fish ponds.

Hasted's entry: LANGLEY-PARK is a seat of eminent account in this parish, which was formerly accounted a manor, and in the reign of the Conqueror was part of the vast estate of Odo, bishop of Baieux, and earl of Kent; and is thus, if I mistake not, described in the general survey of Domesday, taken in that reign: (regretably Hasted did mistake it)

Goisfridus de Ros holds of the bishop (of BaieuxLasela. It was taxed at 7 shillings. The arable land is . . . . . . . In demesne there are 3 carucates, and 31 villeins, with 14 borderers having 16 carucates. There are 10 servants, and one fishery producing fourscore and 10 eels; wood for the pannage of 55 hogs. The whole manor was worth, in the time of king Edward the Confessor, 30 pounds, when he received it 16 pounds, and now 24 pounds, what Goisfridus held; what Richard of Tonbridge held in his lowy was rated at 6 pounds; what the king held of this manor, 22 shillings. Brixi Cilt held it of king Edward.

This place afterwards came into the possession of the family of Malmaines, who were settled at Waldershare in this county, in the time of the Conqueror. John de Malmaines obtained a charter of free warren for his lands in Begenham, in the 12th year of king Edward II. which was renewed to Henry Malmaines, of Cliffe, in the 3d year of king Edward III.

It appears by the Book of Aid, in the 20th year of king Edward III. that Nicholas Malmains held half a knight's fee of the king in Begenham. He died, in the 23d year of that reign, possessed of much land in this county; before the end of which, the property of this manor was transferred by sale to Langley, a name most probably taken from this place, though the family itself has been long since extinct. These Langleys of Beckingham were, most probably, adistinct family from those of Knowlton in this county, who were originally descended from a family of that name in the county of Warwick.

The last of this name here was Ralph Langley, who died in the 30th year of king Henry VI. and by his will directed Langley, with the rest of his demesnes in Beckenham, to be sold for discharging his debts; in pursuance of which it was passed away by sale to John Violett, who bore for his arms, Gules, three coronets, or, whose descendants enjoyed it until the beginning of the reign of king Henry VIII. when it was conveyed to John Stile, alderman of London.

He was the son of William Style of Ipswich, was afterwards knighted, and of the Drapers company, and dying in 1500, was buried in Allhallows Barking church, London. He married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Sir Guy Wolston of London, by whom he had Sir Humphrey Style, of Langley, who was one of the esquires of the body to king Henry VIII. and sheriff of this county in the 35th year of the same reign. He died in 1557, and was buried in Beckenham church. He procured a grant from Sir Thomas Wriothesley, garter principal king at arms, reciting, that not being willing to bear arms in prejudice to the other branches of his family, he had petitioned for a coat, with a proper difference, which the said king at arms, in 1529, granted, under his hand and seal, viz. Sable, a fess engrailed between three fleurs de lis, within a bordure or, the fess fretted of the field.

He procured, with others, an act of parliament in the 2d and 3d years of king Edward VI. for the disgavelling of his lands in this county.

By his first wife, Bridget, daughter of Sir Thomas Baldrey, he had three sons; Edmund, born at Langley, in 1538; Oliver, who was sheriff of London, and ancestor of the Styles, of Watringbury, barts. and Nicholas, who was knighted.

From Edmund Style of Langley, esq. before-mentioned, eldest son of Sir Humphrey, descended Sir Humphry Style of Langley, eldest son of William, who was gentleman of the privy-chamber to king James, and cupbearer to king Charles I. and was created a baronet, by privy-seal, on the 20th of May, 1627. (fn. 26) But though this branch was the elder to those of Watringbury, yet these last were the senior baronets, being created April 21, 1627, anno 3 Charles I. He died in 1650, and was buried in the vault at Beckenham church, and leaving no issue, his title became extinct, and he was succeeded in this estate at Langley by his half-brother, William, the eldest son of William Style by his second wife, Mary, daughter of Sir Robert Clarke, one of the barons of the exchequer.

This William Style of Langley, esq. was bred a barrister at law, and was of the society of the Inner Temple. He married Elizabeth, sole daughter and heir of William Duleing, by whom he had two sons, and two daughters, and dying in 1679, was buried in this church.

Of the sons, the second, but only surviving son Humphry, succeeded his father at Langley, in whose time there were several coats of arms, as well of this family as of those they had intermarried with, painted in the windows of this house, but dying without issue male, his only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, carried it in marriage to Sir John Elwill, bart. who died in 1727, without issue by her. This family of Elwill was of Exeter in Devonshire, who bore for their arms, Ermine on a chevron engrailed, between three eagles displayed gules, three annulets or, and were advanced to the dignity of a baronet, in the person of Sir John Elwill, in the 8th year of queen Anne's reign. He was twice married, but left issue only, by his second wife, the daughter and heir of — Leigh of Egham, in Surry, by whom he had two sons, Sir John above-mentioned, and Edmund, who succeeded his brother in title and in this estate of Langley, and in 1732 transferred his property in it, together with the house, called Langley-house, the park, and also the north and south isles of the parish church of Beckenham, to Hugh Raymond of Great Saling, in Essex, esq. who settled them on his only son, Jones Raymond, esq. in tail general; remainder to his eldest daughter, Amy, who married Peter Burrell, esq. and her issue male. On his death his son, Jones Raymond, esq succeeded to this estate, and kept his shrievalty for this county at Langley in 1738, in which year he died, and was succeeded by his son, of the same name, who died unmarried in 1768, on which it descended, by the intail before-mentioned, to his sister, Amy, before mentioned, whose husband, Peter Burrell, esq. in her right, became possessed of it. He died in 1756, having had by her, who survived him, four sons and two daughters. Mrs. Burrell, his widow, afterwards resided here, and died in 1794, on which this seat descended, together with her other estates in this parish, to her grandson, sir Peter Burrell, bart. since created lord Gwydir, of whom a full account has already been given, and he is the present possessor of this seat, with the park and grounds belonging to it.

Kelsey or Kelseys and Kelsey Park

Some question exists about the origins of Kelsey as the connection with the de Kelseys is challenged. Later writers have said that the Brograves leased some land from the Bruyns which became Kelsey.

Philipot wrote of Kelsey: Kelseys lies likewise in this Parish, and may justly exact our Notice; by Deeds written in a Character that hath an Aspect upon the Reign of Henry the third, John de Kelsey, William de Kelsey, and others of that Sirname are represented to have an Interest in this Seat, and from hence it is probable the Kelseys of Surrey did derive their first Extraction, however by the Injuries of Time they have been in succeeding Generations cast under the umbrage of an obscurer Fortune: But I return, After this Family had deserted the Possession of this place, which was before the latter End of Richard the the second, I find the Brograves stepped in, and by purchase became Lords of the Fee, a Family which in very old Deeds writ themselves Burgrave, and sometimes Boroughgrave, though now a more easie Pronunciation hath melted it into Brograve, which represents the Etymologie of the Name, to have been in its Origi∣nal perfectly Saxon. In the year 1479, there was a License granted (as appears by the Records of Rochester) to William Brograve by the then Bishop of that Diocess, to erect an Oratory or Chapple at his Mannor-house of Kelseys, the Vestigia or Reliques of which are yet obvious to an inquisitive Eye, and from this William did the Title and possession in an even Current come down to Mr. Thomas Brograve, who being not many years since deceased, his Widow Mrs. Martha Brograve now in respect of Join∣ture, enjoys the present Possession of it.

But having about 130 years more information Hasted says;

KELSEYS is a seat of note in this parish, which as early as the reign of king Henry III. had owners of that name, as appears by deeds written in a character seemingly of that time, wherein John de Kelsey, William de Kelsey, and others of that surname, are described as having an interest in this seat. After this family had deserted the possession of this place, which was in the reign of king Richard II. the Brograves (sometimes written Boroughgrave) were by purchase become owners, and resided at it.

An ancestor of this family was Sir Roger Brograve, who lived in the reign of Edward I. and was of Warwickshire, who bore for his arms, Argent three lions passant guardant gules; from whom descended William Borgrave of Beckenham, to whom, in 1479, licence was granted by the bishop of Rochester (as appears by the records of that church) to erect an oratory, or chapel, at his manor house of Kelseys, the ruins of which are not now even to be traced out. (fn. 20)

At length, a descendant of this name and family, John Brograve, some small time before the year 1688, conveyed this estate by sale to Peter Burrell, esq. who was the ninth son of Walter Burrell, esq. of Holmstead-house, in Cuckfield, in Sussex, whose ancestors are said to have been originally seated in Northumberland as early as the reign of king Edward I. but Randulphus Burrell, son and heir of Randulphus, having married Sermonda, daughter and coheir of Sir Walter Woodland of Devonshire, anno 19 king Edward II. became in her right possessed of a great estate in that county. His direct descendant, John Burrell, was a man of eminence in the reign of king Henry V. and left several sons, of whom Walter, the eldest, succeeded him in his estates; and Gerardus, the youngest, settled at Cuckfield, in Sussex, anno 1446, being vicar of that church, and archdeacon and residentiary of Chichester. He died in 1508, leaving his estate to his nephew, Ralph, who settled at Cuckfield. Thomas, his son, by Dorothy Weston, his wife, had Ninian Burrell, esq. of Cuckfield, who married Jane, daughter of Henry Smith of Surry, afterwards remarried to Peter Courthope, esq. of Danny, in Sussex, and died in 1614, leaving several sons and daughters.

Of the sons, Walter, the eldest, married Frances, daughter of John Hooper of Stockbury, esq. in this county, by whom he had nine sons and three daughters. (fn. 21) Of the former, Peter Burrell, esq. the ninth son, purchased the manor of Kelseys, some few years before the Revolution, as mentioned above. He afterwards settled here, and married Isabella, the second daughter of John Merrick, esq. of Essex, by whom he had six sons and four daughters. He died in 1718, and was buried in this church, leaving only two of his sons, Peter and Merrick, and three daughters, surviving; of whom, Frances married Richard Wyatt, esq. of Egham, in Surry; Isabella married Thomas Dalyson, esq. of Hampton, in this county; and Anne married Richard, brother to Sir Hugh Ackland, bart. of Devonshire.

Merrick Burrell, the youngest son, was of West Grinsted-park, in Sussex, and was created a baronet in the 6th year of George III. to him and his heirs male, and in default of such, to his nephew, Peter Burrell, esq. of Beckenham, since deceased, and his heirs male. On Sir Merrick Burrell's death, s. p. the title of baronet descended to his great nephew, Sir Peter Burrell, the present baronet, since created Lord Gwydir, as will be farther mentioned below.

Peter Burrell, esq. the eldest son, succeeded his father in this estate, and resided at Beckenham. He served the office of high-sheriff of this county in 1722, and died in 1756. He married Amy, eldest daughter of Jones Raymond of Langley, esq. (should read Hugh Raymond of Langley) in this parish, by whom he had four sons and two daughters. Of the former, Peter Burrell, esq, the eldest son, succeeded him in this estate, and was of Beckenham; Raymond, the second son, died young; and William; the third, was bred to the civil law, commenced Doctor of Laws, and was chancellor to the bishops of Worcester and Rochester. He married Sophia, daughter of Charles Raymond of Valentine-house, in Essex, who was created a baronet in 1774, with remainder, in default of issue male, to William Burrell above mentioned, and his heirs male by Sophia his wife, which title, on his death, descended to Sir William Burrell, bart. above mentioned, who died in 1796, leaving his widow surviving, and by her two sons and one daughter. Of the two daughters, Amelia married Tobias Frere, esq. and Isabella died young. Peter Burrell, esq. married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of John Lewis, esq. of Hackney, by whom he had one son, Peter, and four daughters, of whom Elizabeth-Emelia married Richard Henry Alexander Bennett, esq. of Cambridgeshire; Susanna married lord Algernon Percy, second son of the late duke of Northumberland, now lord Lovaine; Frances Juliana married Hugh earl Percy, now duke of Northumberland; and Elizabeth, the fourth daughter, married Douglas duke of Hamilton. He died possessed of Kelseys, in 1775, being succeeded in it by his only son and heir, Peter Burrell, esq. of Beckenham, who was afterwards knighted; and at length, on the death of Sir Merrick Burrell, bart. succeeded to that title by the limitation of the patent. He married in 1779, the lady Elizabeth Priscilla Bertie, eldest sister of Robert late duke of Ancaster. on whose death, s. p. she succeeded to the title of Baroness Willoughby of Eresby, and in her own right and person to the office of Lord Great Chamberlain of England, the office being executed by her husband Sir Peter Burrell, knt. and bart. who was, in May 1796, created Lord Gwydir of Gwydir, in Carnarvonshire. By her he has a son, Peter Robert, born in 1782, and other children, and is the present possessor of this estate. He bears for his arms, Vert three plain shields argent, each having a bordure ingrailed or.

The error regarding Amy Raymond's father, being daughter of Hugh Raymond and not Jones Raymond who was her brother is perhaps connected with Hasted's error regarding Langley and Foxgrove whereby he believes there were two Jones Raymonds when in fact there was only one. Although Hasted's background information is interesting it does not cover the complex land acquisitions and exchanges whereby Kelsey, Langley and parts of Foxgrove and Beckenham Manor came into Burell ownership from Hugh Raymond of Langley and the Tolsons of Foxgrove including the involvement of John Cator who was moving into the area from circa 1757. The timeline attempts to clarify these transactions.


Kent House

Philipot does not mention Kent House but Hasted writes:

"KENT-HOUSE is situated on the very edge of this county, towards Surry, and seems to be so called either from its having been once the outer bounds of this county, or from having been formerly the first house on the entrance into this parish within this county, from that of Surry. It was for some generations in the possession of the family of Lethieullier; the first of whom was Sir John Le Thieullier a Hamburgh merchant, who had raised himself by his industry in trade, and settled in this parish. He devised it at his death to his son, William Lethieullier, of this parish, esq. who by his will gave it, with his mansion and other estates in Beckenham, to his second son, Manning Lethieullier, esq. whose son, John Greene Lethieullier, esq. alienated it, in 1776, to Thomas Lucas, of Lee, in this county, esq. who died possessed of it in 1784, leaving his widow surviving, who re-marrying John Julius Angerstein, of Charlton, esq. he is, in her right, at this time possessed of it."

A few early records can be found relating to Kenthous (sic) at the National Archive etc. and these may lead to more research. Len Hevey believes it was originally part of Beckenham Manor like Foxgrove and Langley and over time these parts became separated from the Manor. A record from 1503 indicates a family called Fabyan held Kenthouse with land in Beckenham, Lewisham and Battersey. Certainly the Style family are associated with Kent House in 1501 and 1624 seemingly acquiring it from an unpaid debt. Before that, in 1346 Henry de Clyf and  in 1384 John Leeg is mentioned as the manor of Kent House. The Lethieulliers acquired Kenthouse and are said to have built Clock House circa 1716/30. Some writers have said Kent House was the first house outside the boundaries of London but its proximity to the Kent/Surrey border is the more likely reason for its name and it has been compared to Kent Hatch and New Cross which were other places on the county border. In earlier times London did not extend south of the Thames until the metropolis grew into Greater London by encompassing villages which became its suburbs. Kent House will be found referred to in the timeline.

Other Properties:

Thayer's Farm

Alternatively spelt Thayre's on a 1736 map of Thomas Motley's properties, the name implies someone called Thayer once owned the farm but he has eluded being definitively traced so far but these records in St. George's burials probably hold clues:

9 Feb 1642
THAIRES Giles(the elder)
6 Aug 1654
THARE Judy d of Giles
15 Apr 1688
THARES Giles s of Giles
9 Jun 1786
THARES John s of Giles
14 Oct 1687
THARES Mary d of Giles
11 Dec 1696
THARES Samuel s of Giles
18 Dec 1696
THARES Valentine s of Giles

6 Sep 1653
THAYER Giles
8 Jun 1648
THAYER Katharine d of Giles
24 May 1644
THEIRE Marie d of Giles
12 Jun 1715
THEYES
Gyles
20 May 1737
THEYR John
10 Sep 1740
THEYR Margaret
1 Oct 1734
THEYR Martha

Giles d.1653 left a will which is being searched for. He was predeceased by two daughters. Presumably Gyles was his son and John maybe a grandson. By 1736 the farm belonged to Thomas Motley and maybe John sold it to Motley near the time of his death. That may have enabled him to provide for Margaret who could have been his wife or daughter.  The story needs confirmation and of course there's a possibility that the Thayers were tenant farmers but the will of Giles of 1653 may contain significant information. Thomas Motley is the earliest confirmed owner we have traced and his map shows the tenant farmers of his land who do not include any Thayres in 1736. Thomas Motley's property descended via his daughter married to Francis Austin and their son Francis Motley Austin. It was later purchased into the Cator estates.

Elmers End Farms

Similar to Thayers Farm, Thomas Motley's map illustrates these and how they were related to neighbouring landlords, the St.Johns, Burrells, St.John Humphrey. The name Elmer was in earlier times often spelt Aylmer, a family that appear in early tax rolls in 1328 and 1345 as well as some archive documents.

Eden Farm or Place was built on part of the Burrells Kelsey/Langley lands and leased to the Eden family. Although said to be part of Langley it would appear that the land was part of Kelsey which was owned by the Burrells along with Langley when the land was leased to the Eden family.

Monks Orchard formed part of the Addington estates of the Leigh family until that was sold to Barlow Trecothick. His heir, a nephew sold Monks Orchard to the Burrells

Clockhouse built for the Lethieulliers had a few fields around it and came into the hands of Joseph Cator in 1782 after Sir Piercy Brett, a former owner, had died. Then it was absorbed into the Cator estates on Joseph Cator's death in 1818 being leased until its demolition. There is some possibility a pre-existing building was on the site indicated by the 1623 Beckenham Manor map, possibly an earlier farmstead but this is one of the many unknown details outstanding.

Woolseys Farm was on and around Clay Hill, the site of what is now Bishop Challoner's School in Bromley Road. The first pictorial descriptions of it are on the 1723 and 1735 Burrell estate maps held in the British Library and at that time it was under the land holdings of the Burrells of Kelseys although leased to someone believed to be Buxton although the map is faded  and the writing difficult to read. Clay Hill was a crossroads on Bromley Road with what is now Scotts Lane and Court Downs Bridge Road. From 1735 the site changed landlords a few times becoming part of Raymond estates after the Raymond and Burrell families intermarried. Then part of an exchange between the Burrells and John Cator, then John Barwell Cator sold it in the early 19th Century. From a farm it became upgraded to a large house with associated farm. Was an hotel for a time before becoming the school.


The Village
The early village would have been dominated by the Parish Church  and Manor House opposite. We might imagine a house with its estate establishing a family chapel and the evolution of a settlement. An estate with farms obviously requires labour so some accommodation for people and livestock would be involved. Some documentary evidence could even imply that the Rector of the Church did occupy the manor house for some time but needs conclusive evidence. The mix of estates and the number of farms would require a good number of people and the early population of Beckenham has been stated as about 1000. Church records would be the most comprehensive record via births, deaths and marriages. Various property documents reveal names of small property owners, leaseholders and tenants. As well as the estate landlords some names cropping up are Willis, Pugh, Grote, Batt etc. The available maps from 1623 onwards illustrate some buildings but maybe only more dominant houses were shown.  The maps had more to do with recording property ownership than accurate representation of landmark details. Some land ownership documents refer to 'Closes' which could be groups of workers cottages or hovels. It seems the term 'hovel' was a bonafide description of a lowly residence. Although the village was small there was a correspondingly small 'workhouse' at Clay Hill and the almshouses next to the church for the impoverished. The Parish system provided some poor relief but if anyone falling on hard times was from a different parish then measures were in place to remove them to their home parish which had responsibility for them. The village had several large houses called Grete(Great) Houses or mansions as well as the old manor house. The Mead was owned by Thomas Motley near Thornton's Corner. Another large house was on the site of the Greyhound Public House or now closed public conveniences. Village Place was also on the High Street nearly opposite the Village Way junction. Beckenham Lodge once owned by the Banyer family was near the War memorial/Barclays Bank site with its own grounds.
The estate maps of the Burrells dated 1809 and the Cators dated 1868 show a lot of detail of the village and surroundings before large scale development took place. The writings of Borrowman, Copeland, Inman, Tonkin and Manning are the best sources of information about the 19th century  village. As one works backwards the  details becomes harder to define.

Beckenham Rectory
In the late 18th Century William Rose the Rector had a Rectory built to the designs of the Adam Brothers. His 'living' from the parishes of Beckenham and Carshalton plus family wealth must have been considerable as he also had designs for a substantial stables. Our thanks go to David Love for this article about the Rectory.


Penge
.
More associated with Battersea in ancient times the area became more connected with Beckenham over a period of time. Some connections came about through the St.John family who had acquired Battersea (Batricksey) Manor before they purchased Beckenham Manor and part of Beckenham Manor is near Rockhills
A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 4. Originally published by Victoria County History, London, 1912.


The 'hamlet' of Penge was part of the ancient ecclesiastical parish of Battersea. The curious anomalies of its local government led to its formation as a separate urban district and its transfer to the county of Kent in 1900. (fn. 49) Penge was a wooded district, over which the tenants of Battersea Manor had common of pasture. (fn. 50) The boundaries of the hamlet on the north in February 1604–5 were the common of Rockhills (evidently Rockhills in Upper Sydenham, immediately north of the Crystal Palace) and the 'Shire Ditch' leading past the house called 'Abbetts' to the north corner of 'Lord Riden's Wood.' The Shire Ditch also bounded the hamlet on the east and was crossed by 'Willmoores Bridge,' half in Kent and half in Surrey. On the south it was bounded by the waste or common of Croydon, the green way from Croydon to Lewisham. On the west was a wood 'of Mr. Colton's' in Camberwell parish, which stretched from Vicker's Oak to the Low Cross near Rockhills. (fn. 51) There seem to have been several tenants of the manor at Penge in 1596, (fn. 52) but in 1725 the vicar of Battersea returned to Bishop Willis that there were only thirteen houses and sixty inhabitants in Penge, who went to Beckenham Church, and for whose care he paid a trifling consideration to the incumbent of Beckenham. (fn. 53) The whole common was inclosed under an Act of 1827. (fn. 54) There were then 320 acres already inclosed and several houses standing there. In 1853 Mr. Schuster sold his park on the summit of Penge Hill to the Crystal Palace Company for the re-erection of the gigantic building made by Sir Joseph Paxton for the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. (fn. 55) The Palace was opened by Queen Victoria in 1854. (fn. 56) In 1877, owing to financial difficulties and to the 'Greenwich fair characteristics,' which had replaced the former educational objects of the Palace, the company was reconstituted. (fn. 57) The Palace, as originally planned, was the exhibition building of glass and iron which had served for the Exhibition of 1851 in Hyde Park, re-erected on this site, with the addition of high water towers to supply the fountains in the grounds. Inside courts were erected to illustrate the arts and architecture of different periods, from the Egyptian monarchy to the Italian Renaissance, and there was a great collection of plaster casts of famous statues. (fn. 58) A School of Art and Music was established, and later a School of Forestry and Engineering, which has continued to flourish. The Palace became the chief seat of the highest class of music near London, and the Handel Festivals, under the direction of Sir Michael Costa and Sir August Manns, obtained the greatest reputation, as did the Saturday Concerts so closely associated with the names of Sir August Manns and Sir George Grove. But the public taste did not rise to this level, and the theatre and music-hall exhibitions gradually eclipsed the educational features. The grounds, of great extent, including a cricket field, football ground and a lake, continue to furnish unrivalled scope for exhibitions, excursions, games and firework or aeronautical displays. The land surrounding the Palace was sold shortly before 1875 for building purposes, and the whole site is now for sale.

Between 1821 and 1841 the population of Penge increased very slightly. In 1841 it was 270. In 1851, owing to the establishment of the Surrey School of Industry, the Queen Dowager's Almshouses and the Watermen's Almshouses, it had increased to 1,169. In 1901 it was 22,465. One great cause of this increase was the advent of the London, Brighton and South Coast, and London, Chatham and Dover railways, which constituted Penge a suburb of both London and Croydon. The former has stations at the Crystal Palace, Anerley and Penge; Penge station, on the latter, is within the boundary of Beckenham. A town hall was built in the Anerley Road in 1879. Anerley, Penge and Upper Norwood are the three wards of the Penge Urban District. The ecclesiastical districts of St. John the Evangelist, St. Paul, Holy Trinity and Christ Church were formed in 1851, 1869, 1873 and 1886 respectively.


Beckenham Place Park
In Hasted's History of Kent he briefly describes Beckenham Place as the seat John Cator and that it was built in 1773 on the purchase of Beckenham Manor from Frederick St. John.  We have found this to be inaccurate in several respects. Cator had acquired land which was part of Foxgrove Manor from the late 1750's and his exchanges of various plots with Jones Raymond and Amy Burrell brought him into posession of the site of the current Beckenham Place mansion on Stumpshill by 1759/60. Cator's father in law Peter Collinson writes of visiting his daughter and Cator in June 1763 at their newly built house at Stumpshill and he admires the grounds and planting around the house. At that time Cator did not own all of the subsequent parkland and the  remaining park contains little if any of the Beckenham Manor land acquired from Frederick St. John. Complex purchases and exchanges are described in the timeline along with several questions and facts regarding the Cators and the other landlord families.
Details of the features within Beckenham Place mansion can be found in Cultivated Leisure by David Love

Shortlands, Clay Hill, Scott' Lane
Shortlands is a relatively recent development which covers the area of the earlier Clay Hill which itself was an evolution from Cleyhurst. The properties of Lodge Farm and Woolseys Farm have been swallowed up by it and it has taken its name from Shortlands Green which goes back beyond the 17th Century. Shortlands House, now Bishop Challoner's School, is on the site of Woolseys Farm. Scott's Lane takes its name from James Scott, a surgeon of Bromley who took up residence there. These articles by Linda and Keith Baldwin trace its history and some interesting personalities who lived there. Follow Shortlands and Scott for the articles in pdf format.


Timeline (note;  The Early History of Beckenham by Len Hevey is a recommended read alongside this for pre-history until the 14th Century)

1042-1066 King EDWARD THE CONFESSOR (The reigns of monarchs will be inserted to add perspective along with some events)
Following the death of Harthacanute, Edward restored the rule of the House of Wessex to the English throne. A deeply pious and religious man, he presided over the rebuilding of Westminster Abbey, leaving much of the running of the country to Earl Godwin and his son Harold. Edward died childless, eight days after the building work on Westminster Abbey had finished. With no natural successor, England was faced with a power struggle for control of the throne.

We do not have any evidence of Beckenham from this time apart from the Domesday Book entry but as Domesday refers back to the time of Edward the Confessor his period of reign may be relevant.

1066 - HAROLD II, you should have learnt this at school...The Battle of Stamford Bridge, Battle of Hastings and all that. According to Domesday, Anschil or Eskil was the Lord in 1066 and before, paying tax to King Edward. Spellings differed according to old english or french versions.

1066 - 1086 King William I (the Conqueror)

1066-1086 was a period of turmoil which has been well researched by others but culminated in the Great Survey or Domesday in which William wanted to determine what taxes had been owed during the reign of King Edward the Confessor thereby allowing William to reassert the rights of the Crown and assess where power lay after a wholesale redistribution of land following the Conquest.

The Domesday survey was carried out by commissioners holding sworn inquests in local courts, where they asked fixed questions of local men. For each property, each question was asked three times, to cover changes over time. The commissioners asked how land had been held:

The questions included: (replies inserted from data)

In the beginning of the Domesday survey, Anschillus de Bacheham (Anschil/Eskil of Beckenham) is said to have had the liberties of sac and soc (jurisdiction) within his lands, in the Lathe of Sutton at the time of Edward the Confessor but by 1086 Ansgot of Rochester is subtenant under Odo Biship of Bayieux. Ansgot holds various other manors in Kent and an Ansgot is described as Chamberlain to William Rufus who succeeded William the Conqueror.

Is it beyond any possibility that Anskil  could have been restyled as Ansgot.  Some debate has surmised that Ango-Saxon names were translated into Norman/French versions.

Beckenham is  recorded as having 34 households, 22 villagers, 8 smallholders and 4 slaves.  Domesday excluded land held by the crown or church.

In 1066 Anschil (Eskil) was landholder to the lord King Edward but Odo is still recorded as tenant in chief in 1086 with Ansgot of Rochester subtenant despite Odo's apparent fall from grace. It is interesting to note Danish names appearing (Bigga & Eskil) in an area not noted for Viking invasion but this implies a mixed population.

Bishop Odo was a maternal half-brother of William the Conqueror who was a trusted royal minister, even acting regent in William’s absences, but in 1067 he was found to be defrauding both the crown and diocese of Canterbury and a number of properties were sequestered. In 1082 he was imprisoned for planning a military expedition to Italy and all of his lands were taken back by the King. He remained in prison for 5 years only released by King William on his deathbed but never regained any power. He is reputed to have later taken part in a rebellion to replace William Rufus (William II) but was allowed to leave Kent for Normandy and his land in England was forfeit to the crown. Hevey  states that Beckenham remained in the  king's hands until the reign of  King John.

1086 - Domesday Book entry for Beckenham, Hasted had transcribed: In Brunlei hundred Ansgotus de Rochester holds of the bishop (of Baieux/Odo) Bacheham. It was taxed at 2 sulings. The arable land is eight carucates. In demesne there are 2 carucates, and 22 villeins, with 8 borderers, having 8 carucates and a half. There are 12 acres of meadow, and 4 servants, and 1 mill, and wood for the pannage of 60 hogs. In the time of king Edward the Confessor, and afterwards, it was worth 9 pounds, now 3 pounds. Anschil held it of king Edward.

8 Carucates or Ploughlands are estimated to be 120 acres each, ie 960 acres. A plough team is said to be 8 oxen.

The much later Foxgrove map of 1766 copied from 1720 records that "20 great beasts of Foxgrove" were grazed on land alongside the Ravensbourne. The Manor of Beckenham map of 1623 shows land of 936 acres but excludes Foxgrove, Langley and Kelsey etc but does include woodlands on the manor. So Domesday's coverage requires clarification. An ideal position for a mill would have been on the Beck in Kelseys where the river descends through the two lakes though other positions on the Beck may have been utilized for mill ponds. A windmill once stood on Bromley Hill but nothing definite can be identified for Domesdays description.

A more modern translation of Domesday describes Land of Bishop Odo of Bayeux


1086 - Langley/West Wickham: if we take it that Langley was not identified in the Domesday survey, being confused with Langley near Maidstone or Hasted's 'Lasela' which turns out to be Seal near Sevenoaks, then some of Langley may have been part of West Wickham with the following entry. The Beckenham, West Wickham and Hayes parish boundaries meet within Langley. Maps indicate the parish boundaries having Langley Place estates partially in Wickham, the 1750's Raymond map of Langley and the OS 1860/70's Kent sheet XV illustrate boundaries..

[West] Wickham was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Helmestrei and the county of Kent.

Households: 24 villagers. 13 slaves. Land and resources Ploughland: 2 lord's plough teams. 4 men's plough teams. Other resources: Woodland 10 swine render. 1 mill, value 1 shilling and 7 pence. 1 church.Valuation Annual value to lord: 13 pounds in 1086; 6 pounds when acquired by the 1086 owner; 8 pounds in 1066.

Owners 

Whatever the outcome of Domesday, then locally only Beckenham, Bromley and West Wickham were recorded. Lewisham to the north could be of interest as a bordering neighbour. But several factors may limit the detail provided by Domesday. The Sulings or areas able to be ploughed were not fixed in size and  the area of ploughable land was influenced by soil types. There was presumably more woodland as a resource for building material and fuel. The population of Britain has been estimated at  1.25 to 2 million or less than 1/30th  of todays. A website related to Domesday quotes:

The total population of England in 1086 cannot be calculated accurately from Domesday for several reasons: only the heads of households are listed; major cities like London and Winchester were omitted completely; there are no records of nuns, monks, or people in castles. The population of England at the time of Domesday has been tentatively estimated at between 1¼ and 2 million. However, these figures are much lower than the 4 million people there are estimated to have been in Roman times.
Lincolnshire, East Anglia and East Kent were the most densely populated areas with more than 10 people per square mile, while northern England, Dartmoor and the Welsh Marches had less than three people per square mile. This is because many villages had been razed by the conquest armies.
see; https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/domesday/world-of-domesday/landscape.htm

Len Hevey compares the estimates of Domesday with the Tithe map of 1838 and finds that the total area is within 150 acres by comparison of 3300 acres (Domesday) and 3439 acres (1838 Tithe). This would also indicate that all the land was under 'Beckenham Manor' before Foxgrove, Langley, Kelsey and other properties were carved off.

1086 - Peverel of London;  Two manors in Kent which in 1086 belonged to Ansgot de Rovecestre did not pass to his descendants. Instead they became merged with the package of lands, mostly in Essex, which in 1086 belonged to Rannulf Pevrel. It is not known how this happened. One guess might be that Ansgot married his daughter to Rannulf’s son, giving her these two manors as her marriage portion; but there are other imaginable explanations. At all events, the entire holding lapsed to the king on the death of Rannulf’s son Willelm. It came to be known as the honour of Peverel of London. The manors in question are Beckenham and Stoke (i.e. the portion of Stoke which did not belong to the church of Rochester). Half of Beckenham (the northern half) seems to have been held in domain until being granted out by Henric II: the first recorded owner is Willelm fiz Erneis (occ. 1168). The other half of Beckenham (the half which came to be called Langley Park), together with Stoke, became the property of a family whose name, in its earliest appearance, is Malesmæins (R1, fo. 186r); I take that to mean males meains, ‘pain in the wounds’. (But thirteenth-century scribes spell the name in various ways, not seeming to know or care about its etymology.) That surname attached itself to the manor in Stoke.
http://www.durobrivis.net/survey/db-ke/09-baronies.pdf
substantiating evidence is perhaps needed.

1087-1100 King William II (Rufus)

1086-1096 Ansgot of Rochester, who held the Manor of Beckenham and several other manors in Kent is thought to have died during this time. (source: Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1991)

Two manors in Kent which in 1086 belonged to Ansgot de Rovecestre (Rochester) did not pass to his descendants. Instead they became merged with the package of lands, mostly in Essex, which in 1086 belonged to Rannulf Pevrel. It is not known how this happened. One guess might be that Ansgot married his daughter to Rannulf’s son, giving her these two manors as her marriage portion; but there are other imaginable explanations. At all events, the entire holding lapsed to the king on the death of Rannulf’s son Willelm. It came to be known as the honour of Peverel of London.

The manors in question are Beckenham and Stoke (i.e. the portion of Stoke which did not belong to the church of Rochester). Half of Beckenham (the northern half) seems to have been held in domain until being granted out by Henry II: the first recorded owner is Willelm fiz Erneis (occ. 1168). The other half of Beckenham (the half which came to be called Langley Park), together with Stoke, became the property of a family whose name, in its earliest appearance, is Malesmæins (R1, fo. 186r); I take that to mean mal es meains, ‘pain in the wounds’. (But thirteenth-century scribes spell the name in various ways, not seeming to know or care about its etymology.) That surname attached itself to the manor in Stoke. In the 1130 Pipe Roll WILLIAM de Tresgoz (Tregoz) sheriff of Wiltshire renders an account of the farm of the land of William Peverel of London including “in repairing the houses and parks and spinneys and fishponds 115s and in enlarging the park of Beckenham 18s”. In the 1139 pipe roll William de Tregoz is still farming the lands of William Peverell of London.[1]

William de Peverell was a staunch supporter of King Stephen, he was imprisoned with him in 1141, and about 1152 Henry II dispossessed him of all of his lands most likely because of his support for Stephen against Henry.

[1] Battle Abbey Roll http://www.1066.co.nz/Mosaic%20DVD/library/Battle%20Roll/battle_abbey_roll3/battle_abbey_roll3.html



1100 - King Henry I until 1135. Henry Beauclerc was the fourth and youngest son of William I. Well educated, he founded a zoo at Woodstock in Oxfordshire to study animals. He was called the ‘Lion of Justice’ as he gave England good laws, even if the punishments were ferocious. His two sons were drowned in the White Ship so his daughter Matilda was made his successor. She was married to Geoffrey Plantagenet. When Henry died of food poisoning, the Council considered a woman unfit to rule and so offered the throne to Stephen, a grandson of William I. (source: www.historic-uk.com)

1100 - William de Insula to all men of Kent, French and English and in particular (nominatim) to the men of Beccaham, greeting. Know that I have granted to Christ Church, London, and the canons there, the land of Beccaham, which was Reginald Gahit's, which he held by service of a half knight, and which Picot Empasterat gave to the same church, William, Reginald's heir, agreeing; to hold of me and my heirs as freely as Picot held the same, and this by service of a half knight. Witnesses: Cecily, his wife, Rodbert, his son, Geoffrey, the chaplain, William of Lincoln. Kent. Endorsed:—[-] Becheham[-] Becham. (source: National Archive, BHO Ancient Deeds)

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/ancient-deeds/vol5/pp214-228

William de Insula is said  to  be the same as William de Lisle

And this 12th Century Ancient deed;  Grant; Grant in frank almoin by William de Insula, with the consent of William his heir, Cicely the grantor's wife, and the rest of his children, to the canons of Christ Church, London, of the land which Robert de Witecroft held of him in Becham. Witnesses:- Prior Bernard of Dunestaple, Geoffrey, chaplain of the said William, Robert de Cornhello, and others (named): [Norf.]. Twelfth century. Ref. E 40/5493 (TNA and BHO) curiously BHO have linked it to Norfolk where there is a town called Becham. That is thought to be an error.

Such grants of lands to religious orders would effectively pass the income from rents to the order and chains of letting and sub-letting would emerge down to the occupant and cultivator of any land. Picot can be found as a reference connected with Norfolk or Cambridge but Gahit has not returned any results from searches.


1100 - Grant by David, son of John, son of Alexander de Orpintun [Orpington], to Holy Trinity Priory, London, of his rights in lands at Beckenham and "Clayherst". Kent (source NA)

1129 - In the late 1120’s Hamo (Haimo II) sheriff died without heirs. His land (which also included Camberwell) was divided between Robert Earl of Gloucester and Robert de Crevicoeur (Calvados) Lord of Chatham[1]. This could be the part of Beckenham which was in the king’s hands in 1130 (To the earl of Gloucester 41 s. In the king's demesne of Beckenham 2 s. 4 d.), but the rest was probably already owned by the family which gave its name – Mal es meains, ‘Pain in the wounds’ – to the manor in Stoke.[2]

Walter son of Odo paid a fine in 1129/30 to secure his inheritance in Lincolnshire from the Countess of Chester as a beneficiary of Ivo Taillebois. Walter is also recorded as witness to a charter by William de Lisle granting Beckenham to Quarr Abbey circa 1130 (held at Belvoir Castle).



[1] https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=bviFDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=%22earl+of+gloucester%22+odo+bayeux&source=bl&ots=JETGaHJQSf&

sig=ACfU3U1SIP-G_LvqPZ8R5nxt_fW1Q0yo2Q&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiE-8313sTmAhWhmFwKHTPkBJ8Q6AEwD3oECA4QAQ#v=onepage&q=beckenham&f=false page 67

[2] http://www.durobrivis.net/articles/landowners.pdf (E 372/1, p. 68)

1134/5 - This document must be from the change of King Henry I to Stephen when Henry's daughter Mathilda was regent or empress for a short time having been named as heir by Henry but deposed in favour of Stephen. From a latin document requiring more translation attributed to 1141.

The empress confirms the gift of land in Beckenham (Kent) from Picot empastorator. and also those in 517

Latin text: M(athildis) imperatrix H(enrici) regis filia et Anglorum domina baronibus justiciartio vicecomiti et ministris et omnibus fidelibus suis Francis et Anglis dc Kent salutem. Sciatis me concessisse ecclesie Christi Lund(onie) et canonicis deo ibidem servientibus in elemosinam in perpetuum, pro animabus patris et matris mee et pro salute anime mee, terrain quam Picotus empastorat(or} eis dedit in villa de Bekaham, et vii solidatas terre quas Picot(us) emit de hominibus ejusdem ville. et viii solidatas terre Aestmundi. et terram de Claiherste cum omnibus rebus, locis, consuetudinibus et libertatibus ad easdem terras pertinentibus liberas et quielas ab omnibus rebus excepto servitio dei. Preterea concedo eis pasturam decem bou{m) inter meos boves in plano et in bosco. et x porcos sine pathnagio, et super hoc prohibeo super forisfactum meum ne aliquis sit ausus hominibus vel rebus ad predictam ecclesiam pertinentibus aliquam injuriam vel contumeliam inferre, quia nolo quod ecclesia jus suum vel libertatem in aliquo tempore meo perdat. Testim(onio) Rodb(er)to com(ite) de Glo[ecestria] . . . cancel[l]ario.

Translations from online which although inaccurate give some idea of the gist. Archaic English Latin is said to be idiosyncratic;

Mathilda empress Henry the king's daughter and the English lady barons sheriff and ministers and all the faithful of their French and English of Kent health. You may know me concessisse of the church of Christ in Lund(onie) and the canonical god there servers as alms in perpetuity, for the souls of the father and mother mee and for the health of the anime mee, terrain than Picotus empastorator them gave in the village of Bekaham, and seven shillings worth of land which Picotus purchased from men of the same town. and eight shillings worth of land Aestmundi. and the ground of Claiherste with all the things, places, customs and freedoms of those countries appurtenances free and quielas from all things except service to god. Moreover, I grant them food ten herds between my oxen in the plane and in the bosco. and ten pigs without pathnagio(pannage), and over this hindu over forisfactum my not someone is a daring men or things to the saying of the church from any injury or abuse to inflict, because I don't want that church to her right or freedom in any time of my loses. Testim(onio) Rodb(er)to com(go) of Gloucester. . . cancel[l]some scholars, based on

Mathilda Empress, Henry’s daughter, and the English barons Just/justiciar lady ordered the officials and all the faithful, French and English of Kent health/safety. Know that I have granted to the church of Christ (Christchurch), London and the canons of the god in the same place those who are serving in alms for ever, for the souls of my father and of my mother and for the salvation of the my soul, that the land of  Picotus empastorat (or} yield to them in the town of twenty years, and the seven shillings' worth of land, which picot (us) bought from among men of the same town. hundred and eight shillings' worth of land Aestmundi., and the earth out of Claiherste, with all the things, places, customs, and liberties to those lands, a matter that, free and quiet away from all these things, excepto the service of God. in addition, I grant them their pasture, ten? ou { iii) between the piano and my cows in the woods. and ten pigs without pathnagio (pannage); Testiment(signed) Robert of Gloucester, chamberlain.

1135-1154 King Stephen

Undated but during Stephen's reign:

London Holy Trinity Priory:

Stephen King of England of all men, French and English of Becham (Beckenham) health. Know that I have granted, for the life of King Henry and other ancestors, the Holy Trinity London and canons in the country serving Claherst by paying five shillings  per year. The land that was Estmund for eight shillings and six pence per year. so do not make any, that insult to injury or let it be. According to Hubert, the chamberlain. At Westminster.

from a latin document which read; 

Confirmation of the land at Clayhurst and Esmtund‘s land

S(tephanus) rex Angltorum) omnibus hominibus suis Francis et Anglis de Becham salutem. Sciatis me concessisse. pro anima regis Henrici et aliorum antecessorum meorum, ecclesie Sancte Trinitatis London(ie) et canonicis in ea deo servientibus terram suam de
Claherst  per v solidos  reddendo (sic) inde per annum. Et terram que fuit Estmund per viii solidos et vi denarios reddendos per annum. Quare volo et precipio quod ipsi teneant eam bene et in pace, et libere et honorifice eam teneant (sic) in bosco et plano et pratis et pasturis et omnibus aliis rebus. ita ne ulla eis injuria vel contumelia fiat. Teste Huberto camerario. Apud Westmonasterium.

Source: Regesta Regum Anglo Normannorum 1066-1154

In the 12th Century there are two grants made to Holy Trinity (Christchurch) Priory in London of lands in Beckenham (including Cleyherst) by Walter son of (Count?) Gilbert & David son of John son of Alexander of Orpington.

Another document from Stephen's reign: Stephen, king of England R. . . Malmains and man of Becham health. know I have granted the canon of Holy Trinity London the ground of  Claiherst at XII pence per year. I want to advise that, in peace and honor office he holds,they may have no wrong done to them on that.Testement/signed Hubert Chamberlain . In Westminster

1154-1189 King Henry II

1176 - Westminster Abbey Charters; (But maybe 1160; year VI Henry the younger) 298. Grant by Abbot Walter to William son of Ernis, of land at Penge (Surr.), for thirty years. Chapter, Westminster 29 Sept. 1176.

Sciant omnes ad quos littere iste pervenerint quod ego Walterus, Dei gratia abbas Westmonasterii, et conventus eiusdem loci, communi assensu concessimus Willelmo filio Ernisii terram illam que est extra nemus nostrum de Pange, sicut aqueductus designat usque ad propriam terram prefati Willelmi, et a nemore archiepiscopi Cantuariensis usque ad parcum de Becham; tenendam de nobis pro xx solidis per annum, scilicet: x solidis ad Pascha et x ad Festum Sancti Michaelis, usque ad xxx annos. Post illum vero terminum, remanebit terra illa ecclesie nostre in eo statu in quo fuit die qua eam predictus Willelmus suscepit, nisi heres ipsius Willelmi obtinere possit apud abbatem et conventum ut deinceps teneat sicut antecessor tenuit. Si vero infra prefatum terminum decesserit sepedictus Willelmus, heres ipsius tenebit usque ad memoratum terminum. Hanc autem conventionem fideliter tenendam juravit idem Willelmus in capitulo nostro, tactis sacrosanctis evangeliis. Facta est autem hec conventio inter nos anno vi coronationis Regis Henrici iunioris, et martirii Beati Thome, ad Festum Sancti Michaelis. His testibus: Magistro Nicholao et Jordano, clericis abbatis; Gilleberto de Wandelesuurtha; Ricardo de Berching'; Radulfo camerario abbatis; Henrico de Winton; Henrico de Limeseia; Eudone filio Ernisii; Hugone Carbunel; Roberto de Martinivilla; Radulfo de Bruhill'; Ricardo Aguillun; Roberto clerico de Becham et Osberto fratre eius; Willelmo presbitero de Beccham et multis aliis.

MS: WAM LII.
10.5 × 9.3 cm. Seal missing. Endorsed: Penge (15C).
Note: No copy because the transaction would have been out of date before any cartulary was made.

(Source BHO)https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol25/pp144-159

Well, my Latin is non existent but I can make out Robert Clerk of Beckenham and William priest of Beckenham. Also this online translation:

Know all to whom from one letter to another this have reached that I Walter, by the grace of God (Abbot of Westminster) abbas's archaeology, and the meeting of the same place, the common consent concessimus William fitz Ernisii country that is outside the forest (Pange), we sing, o, as the aqueduct designates(stream boundary) up to a proper ground aforementioned of William, and a tree of the archbishop of Canterbury down to the park about Becham (Beckenham); to hold of us for twenty shillings per year, namely: 10 at the staple at Easter and 10 at the Feast of St. Michael up to thirty years. After that the limit will remain the land of those of our church in a position where it was the day on which it aforesaid William received, unless the heir of of William to obtain a can with has and log in to the forward hold as the ancestor held. If, however, below aforementioned term has died(expired) sepedictus William, the heir of the hold up to had a limit. This agreement faithfully hold sworn the same William on the article and our, touching sacred gospels (sworn on the Bible). You made this meeting between us in the year vi (six) coronation of King Henry the younger, and martirii(martyr) of the Blessed Thomas, the Feast of Saint Michael. With these witnesses: Master Nicholao and Jordano, clergy, abbot; Gilleberto of Wandeleswrtha; Ricardo de Berching'; Ralph camerlengo abbot; Henry of Winton; Henry of Limeseia; Eudo the son Ernisii; Hugh Carbunel; Robert de Martinivilla; Ralph of Bruhill'; Ricardo Aguillun; Robert the clerk of Becham and Osberto brother of his; William priest of Beccham and many others.


1189- King  Richard (the Lionheart) until 1199

1199 - King John until 1216

1204 - Land in Penge; 330. From the Calendar of Fines, Surrey; Final concord between Abbot Ralph, plaintiff, and William de Ginnes and his wife Matilda, defendants, concerning a carucate of land in Battersea (Surr.), and the wood and land of Penge (Surr.). Curia Regis, Westminster. Easter term 1204.[1]


Latin text; Hec est finalis concordia facta in curia domini regis apud Westmonasterium a die Pasche in j mensem, anno regni Regis Johannis quinto, coram Gaufrido filio Petri, Ricardo de Her[iet'], Simone de Pat[es]hull, Eustachio de Faucunb[er]g, Johanne de Gestling, Osberto filio Hervei, Godefrido de Insula, Waltero de Creping', justiciariis, et aliis baronibus domini regis tunc ibi presentibus, inter Radulfum abbatem Westmonasterii, petentem, et Willelmum de Ginnes, et Matildem uxorem suam, tenentem, de una carucata terre cum pertinentiis in Batricheseya sicut aquaductus designat usque ad propriam terram predicti Willelmi, et a nemore archiepiscopi Cantuariensis usque ad parcum de Beke[n]ham. Unde placitum fuit inter eos in prefata curia, scilicet: quod predicti Willelmus et Matildis recognoverunt totam predictam terram cum pertinentiis esse ius ipsius abbatis et ecclesie Sancti Petri de Westmonasterio. Et pro hac recognitione et fine et concordia predictus abbas concessit predicto Willelmo et Matildi et heredibus ipsius Matildis totam predictam terram cum pertinentiis, tenendam de ipso abbate et successoribus suis inperpetuum per liberum servicium viginti solidorum per annum pro omni servicio, reddendo ad duos terminos anni, scilicet: ad Pascha decem solidos, et ad Festum Sancti Michaelis decem solidos. Et pro hac concessione predicti Willelmus et Matildis remiserunt et quietum clamaverunt predicto abbati et successoribus suis totum ius et clamium quod habuerunt in bosco et in terra de Pange de se et heredibus ipsius Matildis inperpetuum, ita quod predictus abbas et successores sui possint facere voluntatem suam de predicto bosco et terra sine contradictione predictorum Willelmi et Matildis et heredum ipsius Matildis: ita tamen quod predictus abbas concessit predicto Willelmo et Matildi et heredibus ipsius Matildis communam herbagii in bosco suo de Pange de omnibus propriis averiis de Bekenham, exceptis capris et alienis averiis, quamdiu boscum clausum non fuerit. Et preterea idem abbas concessit predictis Willelmo et Matildi et heredibus ipsius Matildis triginta porcos in predicto bosco quietos de pannagio et omnes alii porci et omnia averia de Bekenham removeantur de predicto bosco de Pange quamdiu pessio durat, scilicet: inter Festum Sancti Michaelis et Festum Sancti Martini. Et si forte contigerit quod predictus abbas vel successores sui predictum obscum de Pange clauserunt predicti Willelmus et Matildis et heredes ipsius Matildis habebunt in predicto bosco pasturam ad quadraginta animalia et ad centum oves et predictos triginta porcos quietos de pannagio. Et si forte contigerit quod idem abbas vel successores sui de predicto bosco essartare voluerint licet bene facere eis hoc sine contradictione predictorum Willelmi et Matildis vel heredum ipsius Matildis sed tamen remanebit de predicto bosco et herbagio non sartato quod idem Willelmus et Matildis et heredes ipsius Matildis habeant sustentacionem ad predictos triginta porcos et ad quadraginta animalia et ad centum oves. Et idem abbas cepit homagium ipsius Willelmi de predicta terra in eadem curia.

Translation: (not accurate but you get the gist) This is the final agreement in the king's court at Westminster on Easter one month fifth year of King John, before Geoffrey Fitz Peter, Richard Her [descryed '], Simon of Pat [are] Hull, Eustace of Faucunb [e ] G, John Gesding, Osbert son Hervey Godfrey Island, Walter Creping, judges, and other barons of the king but was present, between Ralph abbot of Westminster candidate, and William of Ginnes and Maud his wife, holding; carucate of land with their belongings in Battersea aquaductus as he points to the native countries of William, the archbishop from the grove to the park de Beke [n] ham. Hence it was a plea between them in the aforesaid court, that is: William and Maude acknowledged that all the said land with their belongings and be right at the Abbot of St. Peter of Westminster. And for this acknowledgment and the end, and the concord of the aforesaid abbot was granted to the said William and Matilda, and the heirs of Matilda: the whole of the aforesaid land with its appurtenances, to be held from the abbot and his successors for ever, by his free service of twenty shillings by the year instead of all the service, which may be rendered, at the two ends of the of the year, namely Easter ten shillings, and the Feast of Saint Michael in ten pieces. so that the aforesaid abbot and his successors, that they may do the will of his own in the woodland, and the earth, without contradiction by the aforesaid William and Maud, and heirs of the same Maud, on condition, however, that the aforesaid abbot was granted to the said William and Matilda, and the heirs of Matilda: the common of herbage in his wood of Pange (Penge) of all the de Beckenham be driven with their own, with the exception of the goats, and other men's cattle, as long as the wood is shut up, did not happen. And, furthermore, the same abbot granted to the aforesaid William and Matilda, and their heirs of him, Maud, and thirty pigs in the wood with all was quiet among the pannage of the, and all the other swine fed, and all the beasts of the de Beckenham be removed from the wood with de Pange, as long as pessio lasts, that is, between the feasts of Saint Michael, and the Feast of St Martin . And if you happen to do so, that the abbot or his successors, in the woodland essartare they wish, even though to do good, to them, this is without a contradiction of the aforesaid William, and Maud, the or the heirs of the same Maud, but, however, will remain in the woodland and also the herbage does not sartato what is the same, William, and Maud, and the heirs of Matilda: they have a maintenance at said thirty to forty pigs and animals and a hundred sheep. The Abbot received homage from William the land in the same court.

It seems that this is disputed though: Otuel (Othewel) de l'Isle notifies the king's justices, who are probably on eyre in Kent, that the prior and canons of Holy Trinity Aldgate, London hold half a knight's fee in Beckenham from him and that it is against his will and unjustly that Alexander de Orpington (Orpenton), the latter's son John and Osbert Huitdeniers (Uitdeniers or Eightpence)[2] entered that land; Otuel excuses himself and sends his son Otuel to bear witness. To the justices of the lord king, Otuel de l'Isle, greeting. Know that the prior and canons of Holy Trinity, London, hold some land in Beckenham from me in fee and heredity by the service of half a knight, as they held from my father and from my brother William and as our charters testify. And therefore I want you to know that neither Alexander de Orpington nor his son John or Osbert Huitdeniers have entered that land through me, but against me and without my consent and unjustly and against all reason, and therefore I send my son Otuel to bear witness of this and I myself would have come to this day if I had not been retained by old age and serious illness. If, however, it should be necessary in some place and at some time, I shall come and stand with the prior and the canons and do what I have to as the lord of the land which they hold from me, as mentioned before. Farewell.[3] [4]

Osbert Huitdeniers is thought to have been both sheriff of London and justiciar at different times. He was a relative of Thomas a Becket and employed him as a clerk on leaving school about 1140.[5] He was responsible for negotiations with Empress Matilda as representative for the Angevins. He held land by Robert Earl of Gloucester (one of many illegitimate sons of Henry I) who may have been responsible for dealing with lands confiscated from Odo

[1] https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-record-soc/vol25/pp175-185

[2] https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=nuYYo5XSlrMC&pg=PA109&lpg=PA109&dq=huitdeniers&source=bl&ots=Imxwb6qHvf&

sig=ACfU3U3XAlQAMjlYmun9qPo0NEDhaK4kQw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiSn9-x1MTmAhVPTsAKHbHVCTMQ6AEwAXoECAgQAQ#v=onepage&q=huitdeniers&f=false [3] ENGLISH LAWSUITS FROM WILLIAM I TO RICHARD I. VOLUME II: HENRY II AND RICHARD I (NOS 347-665) (No 580)

[4] https://www.british-history.ac.uk/ancient-deeds/vol3/pp238-251 National Archives E 40/5937

[5] https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=bkGpFhiPtIEC&pg=PA212&lpg=PA212&dq=osbert+huitdeniers&source=bl&ots=OqofJ1ndOv&

sig=ACfU3U37skWqTarv6rlGLf6ALWJKa7AtRg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjQjLPY2sTmAhVChlwKHT-IATkQ6AEwC3oECA0QAQ#v=onepage&q=osbert%20huitdeniers&f=false


1215 - Magna Carta

1216 - King Henry III until 1272

1227 - 1004. Inspeximus and confirmation by Henry III of 998 (below) mentioning specifically that Holy Trinity is free from subjection to the church of Waltham and confirming especially the gift of Algate with the soke and £25 blanch from the city of Exeter payable at the exchequer by the sheriff of Devon, their land at Leyton and the custody of the hospital next the Tower [f. 180v] and their lands in Bracking granted by King Stephen and Queen Matilda and other lands of the honour of Boulogne (Bolon(ie)), namely the land of Berkeden(e) of the gift of Richard de Anesteye and the land of Corneye and the church of Lefstanechirch of the gift of Hugh Triket and the chapel of Alsiswyk of the gift of Richard son of William; confirmation of their lands and rents in Bekeham and Clayherst of the gift of Picotus Empascorat with the liberties there granted by the Empress Matilda, daughter of Henry I; confirmation of the following gifts; of Roger son of Brian and Matilda his wife, 2 carrucates of land in Hoddenho and Trockyng; of Robert de Gatton, his land in Hamstede as Gilbert de Bradele held it of him at fee-farm; of Hubert the queen's chamberlain 4 librates in the manor of Brackyng; of Richard Wallensis 81½ acres of land and 4 acres of meadow in Brackyng with the services of Augustine the son of Wlwardus, Edith the widow and Richard Cruyland; of Ralph Hareng 25½ acres of land in the field of Heston and the meadow belonging to this tenement and the service which Robert the Smith (faber) of Heston was accustomed to pay annually; of William Blemund all his wood with the heath (bruera) as are enclosed by trenches (fossatis) in the parish of St. Pancras in Kentissetune next the plot (partum) of the bishop of London on the south and of William Uggel and his heirs and their services; of Ralph Triket a croft called Hogue or Hocus and a small piece (morcellum) of land next his barn (horreum) in Brambeleg and Nortmado 'et Spareweham et wildam et Wigewikam' and land formerly of Eadmund and Hugh son of Baldwyn, Hugh's house (managium) with an adjacent field; of Richard son of Osbert a certain place in which a mill was situated in Brambeleg which mill was one of four mills next to that of the nuns of Stratford on the east; of Robert Burell 10s. rent in Brambeleg; of William de Pyrho 16s. rent from a mill called the Monks' Mill in Brambeleg; of Ralph de Heyrun and William Thrisse and William de Berkyng 42 acres of land and 1 acre of meadow and an annual rent of 15s. 6d. and ½ lb. of pepper in Edelmeton; of William, earl of Essex and earl Geoffrey his father his land of Selegeford and 1½ hides in Brambeleg; of Richard de Lucy 20s. rent in Newton and all the land which Godfrey Beifuin his servant (serviens) held a day and a night (una die et una notte) in the manor of Leesnes; of Henry de Furnell and Theobald de Brackyng the mill of Brackyng; of Henry de Corneya land and meadow and a rent of 37d. which he had in Corneya and Widihale; of [f. 181] Peter de Bendeng 10s. of quit rent from land in Bilesherse; of Hubery de Anestie and Denise his wife 9s. of quit rent from the mill of Kaldecote; of Nicholas de Catesber[y] and Katherine his wife 11 acres in Catesbiry; of Thomas de Bordesdon 9 acres of land in Bordesden; of Hugh de Marines 17 acres 1 rood of land and the service of Stephen le Wayte and his heirs in Westmel(n)e; of Richard son of Robert 1¼ virgates of land with pasture in Westmelne and the service of Geoffrey his brother from half the land of the donor's father; of Henry de Scalar(us) and Joan his daughter 9½ acres of land in Widihal; by the permission and confirmation of Earl William de Mandavill forty cartloads of brushwood from the wood of Enefeld; of Walter de Mandevill the church of Brumfeld with its lands and all tithes; and of the same Walter the church of Nuteleg and its lands and all tithes; witnesses, E[ustace] bishop of London, J[ocelin] bishop of Bath and Glastonbury, R[ichard] bishop of Salisbury, Hubert de Burgh justiciar, Ranulf earl of Chester and Lincoln, William de Eynesford, Richard de Argent(an) the king's steward, Stephen [f. 181 v] de Beg(ne), Henry de Capella and others, given under the hand of R[alph] bishop of Chichester, chancellor, at Westminster 8 Feb. 1227.


Margin: Carta iiija.

C.Ch.R., i, 3; Monasticon, vi, 153–4.


998.
 [1121–2] Notification by Henry I that the canons of Holy Trinity shall be free from subjection to other churches; that the canons may close the road between their church and the wall of the City; the king grants them £25 p.a. blanch from the farm of Exeter in free alms, also Alegate with the soke; grant of the English Cnithenegild with all lands and liberties both within the City and without; the canons and their men to hold with all liberties and free customs with sac and soc and toll and team and infaganethief, quit of all gelds, scots, wites, assizes, sheriffs' aids, suits of shires and hundreds [f. 179v] and leets and hustings and of pleas and plaints; hidages and tallages, military service and riding service (de excercitibus et equitacionibus), journeys (de oneribus expedicionum), keeping watch, work on castles, parks, bridges, stews, walls, enclosures, toll on carts, obligation to provide carrying service (summagio) and shipping service, the building of royal residences and of all secular service and exactions, all toll in any market or fair and of all tolls on journeys by road, bridge or sea throughout the kingdom; and the canons' men shall plead only in the canons' court and they shall not be impleaded for any tenement except before the king or his chief justice (capituli justiciario meo); the canons and their men are in the king's special protection; witnesses, Ranulf the chancellor, G. de Clinton, Ralph Basset, at Northampton.

1227 - Birth of Henry Malmaines; eventually Langley;

Henry FitzAilwin m Margaret

  dd. 1212

|     Alan FitzHenry m Orabilis de Mayhamme

|     |     Henry Malmains (changed from FitzHenry)

|     |       bd. 1227

|     |       dd. 1262

|     Peter FitzHenry

|     |     Joan FitzHenry m William Aguillon

|     |     |     Robert Aguillon

|     |     Margaret FitzHenry (aka Cheyney)m Ralph de Clere

|     Thomas FitzHenry

|     Richard FitzHenry


1250 - Beckenham Manor Park, (The lands around the manor, not Beckenham Place Park which occupies the land of Foxgrove Manor) was medieval and already established by the 1250s when mentioned in the land grant (in the British Library) by Sir Richard de la Rochelle to the Hospital of St Katherine next the Tower of London. In this grant the land included Beckenham Park, heriots and reliefs in the village of Beckenham, and the course of Hawk's brooks 'running from my park of Beckenham towards the land of the friars and sister of St Katherine with Hawk's brooks running from it.'[1].


[1] The Landscape Legacy of Deer Parks in Kent & Bromley – Susan Pitman

Susan's book identifies several places which formed deer parks including Langley nearby. The later 1623 map showing fields or areas called Spring Park, Alder Park, Park Close and Rounds Park imply fenced areas (emparked)  and some parts were more wooded such as Stumphill wood. The Hawks brooks is the ancient or original name for the Beck River but some questions arise as to whether 'running from' means downstream in the direction of Lewisham. The northern boundary of the park formed the Parish boundary until this day.

1254 Henry III granted free warren in his lands in Kent, Wiltshire & Essex and weekly markets & annual fairs at Wokenden (South Ockendon) and Market Lavington to Richard de la Rokele at the behest of Sir John Fitz Geoffrey Justiciar of Ireland and uncle of Richard.
After the battle of Evesham the Earl of Gloucester took the Manor of Beghenham value £40 but restored it to him in 1265.

From Magna Carta Ancestry by Douglas Richardson 2nd Ed. 2011: In 1254 at his instance (Sir John Fitz Geoffrey), the king gave a charter to his nephew, Richard de la Rokele, for free warren in Richards demesne lands in the counties of Kent, Wiltshire and Essex and Market Lavington Wiltshire.

Fitz Geoffrey was justiciar for Ireland, a position which the Rokeles acquired later.


1257 - Reference to Amfrey de Beckenham rector of the church of Hodleg

1262 - Richard de la Rokele; South Wokenden, Essex; Free Warren?
Cum Ricardus de la Rokel' nuper dimiserit et concesserit Ricardo de Sancto Dionisio manerium de Wokindon', quod est infra metas foreste regis Essex', habendum et tenendum tota vita ipsius Ricardi de Sancto Dionisio cum omnibus libertatibus ad manerium illud pertinentibus, ac nos per nostras literas patentes dudum concesserimus prefato Ricardo de la Rokel' quod per totam forestam nostram predictam fugare possit leporem, vulpem, tessonem et catum et eos libere capere et asportare quo voluerit sine impedimento nostri vel ballivorum nostrorum foreste predicte ut dicitur, volentes prefato Ricardo de Sancto Dionisio graciam facere specialem vobis mandamus quod quamdiu idem Ricardus de Sancto Dionisio teneat manerium predictum ipsum libertatem predictam per totam forestam predictam Essex' secundum quod in predictis literis nostris patentibus continetur habere et ea uti permittatis sine impedimento vestri vel ballivorum nostrorum foreste predicte sicut predictum est, ac si idem Ricardus de la Rokel' manerium illud in manu sua teneret. Teste rege apud Westmonasterium iiij. die Maii.(BHO)

1267 - Beckenham Manor; Henry le Waleys purchased the Beckenham Manor 1267, but this appears to be on a lease as Henry le Waleys bought Beckenham Manor[1] from Richard de Rupella(de la Rokele)[2]. In fact Richard, who died about 1277, was succeeded by his son Philip[3] whose daughter Isolda took the manor in marriage to Sir William Bruyn according to Hasted or as Isolda was not a daughter  of the Rokeles being a maid of honour of Queen Eleanor was married to William Bruyn/Brune. It is claimed Matilda, daughter of Philip de Rupella/de la Rokeley who married Maurice Bruyn, William and Isolda's son, brought the manors of Beckenham and Okendon(Ockendon, Essex)  to the Bruyn family. Therefore the manor must have been leased to Henry le Waleys.  Waleys rose to be Lord Mayor of London and granted some income from Beckenham to a religous order of nuns. le Waleys name is derived from the fact he is believed to have migrated from Wales. 

[1] https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=hmfZlJ4hi-0C&pg=PA334&lpg=PA334&dq=waleys+beckenham&source=bl&ots=p5WlZZSa2q&sig=ACfU3U3nUtMVJ_9r8K6S0Ht1zQqWlfQhZg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjapuupuNrmAhVPQhUIHfC1At4Q6AEwAnoECAcQAQ#v=onepage&q=waleys%20beckenham&f=false

[2] https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1540-6563.2008.00217.x

[3] https://www.british-history.ac.uk/inquis-post-mortem/vol2/pp133-141
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_le_Walleis

1272 - King Edward I until 1307

1272 - Grantor: Peter de Stokes, Rector of the church of Beckenham. Grantee: Henry le Waleys, citizen of London. PLACE OR SUBJECT: Grant of land, etc., in the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth. COUNTY: London. (TNA)

This only evidences the name of the Rector of Beckenham and that he held land in the Parish of St. Mary Woolnoth in the city of London. There are other references to land in Beckenham being connected to other land in the city via grants and leases.

1274/5? - Kent Hundred Rolls: Beckenham and Foxgrove; translation of a latin document in the National Archive taken from http://www.kentarchaeology.ac/khrp/hrproject.pdf

Edward I returned from crusade in 1274 to a kingdom where the crown had been weakened by civil war during the baronial reform period of 1258-65, and where there was extensive local government corruption. According to the heading of the Kent Hundred Rolls, inquiry was to be made into the king’s rights which had been usurped by lay and ecclesiastical lords, and into the excessive demands of sheriffs, escheators and coroners, and also of bailiffs and other officials, whether royal or seigniorial. Many of the encroachments on royal rights, often dating from c.1258-65, were the result of the expansion of royal government and justice in the thirteenth century. As new royal procedures developed, lay and ecclesiastical lords did their best to take them over for their own use, in order to strengthen their hold over their tenants. Henry III had ordered an inquiry into franchises in 1255, and Edward I throughout his reign was intent on building up the rights and powers of the Crown. He and his lawyers considered that all judicial rights belonged to the Crown, and any private liberty or franchise had to be backed up by royal warrant. He was, moreover, a reformer of law and justice, and realised that discontent among his subjects might lead to protest and rebellion. On the other hand, justice and good government would increase his prestige and his revenues.

Bromley Hundred - The jury say that Beckenham manor was at one time in the lord king’s hand and now Sir Richard de Rupella holds it of the lord king in chief by the service of one knight and they do not know by what warrant. They also say that half the hundred of Bromley is in the lord king’s hand and it is worth 6s. each year and the other moiety of the same hundred is in the bishop of Rochester’s hand but they do not know what it is worth each year. Then they say that a certain land called Foxgrove [Beckenham par.] in the vill of Beckenham is of the lord king’s fee and now John Malemains holds that of Sir Robert Agillon (Aguillon) by the service of a fourth part of one knight’s fee, but from what time or how it was alienated they do not know. Then they say that half the hundred of Bromley was withdrawn by the bishop of Rochester who holds the half hundred for 10 years and it is worth 10s. each year, with loss of 20s. each year to the king. Then they say that the archbishop of Canterbury has the assize of bread and ale and other liberties, as has often been said before but they do not know by what warrant. Then they say that the archbishop of Canterbury, the bishop of Rochester and Sir Richard de Rupella have chace and warrens in their demesnes from ancient times but they do not know by what warrant. Then they say that Adam de Walais, then the bailiff, took 18d. from Ralph de Langel for removing the same man from one assize. money from them for remitting the same summons. Then they say that Hamo de la Forstall gave a certain sum of money more than the ancient farm of this lathe, to Sir Henry Malemains, the sheriff, and because of this he greatly oppressed the people and country unjustly and Alexander de Cateford and Richard de Halifield, who were bailiffs after the said Hamo, acted in the same way and they say that the said Richard took 10s. from Henry de Ponte falsely accusing him of robbery, for a similar reason he took 10s. from Walkelin de Ponte, 2s. from Adam Fidel and 3s. from Richard de la Denne. Then they say that Master Richard de Clifford, the escheator, took possession of Beckenham manor for the lord king by declaring that Richard de Rupella was dead (5 Edward I[1]) and afterwards he took 1 tun of wine, price 1 mark, from Henry le Walais (Waleys) who held the same manor at farm, before he was able to hold and have the term of his farm. Then they say that the same Master Richard, the escheator, caused the greatest destruction in the archbishopric of Canterbury at the time of its vacancy, but they do not know how much. Then [he took] 6d. from Walkelin de Ponte for a similar reason, 4d. from Henry de Ponte for a similar reason and for a similar reason the same Adam took money, corn and timber beyond measure from many men of Bromley hundred. Then the same Adam falsely summoned the men of this hundred at Guildford and afterwards took much.

Jurors for the Hundred of Bromley: Hundred of Bromley John of Foxgrove, John Wymer, Gilbert of Raunesden, Ralph de Perre, Lambert Russel, Ivo de Reyerse. 

Of the names mentioned here we have record of Rupella/Rokele in several references. de Langel is mentioned in a later Lay Subsidy Roll, Malmains is in other references as is Walais/Waleys. Of the jurors John of Foxgrove may have been written 'de Foxgrove' or 'de Foxegrave' in the latin text but not necessarily the family from whom the manor derived its name, rather the other way round? This is among the insights we can get from contemporary documents and accounts. The escheator was responsible for reclaiming property for the crown where a legal heir did not exist. Richard de Rupella (Rokele) did not die until 1277.  Absences may have been due to wars and crusades or foreign duties as the Rokeles held posts in Ireland for the king. And there was an heir in Philip de la Rokele.The actions of Richard de Clifford seemingly gave rise to characterisations such as the Sherrif of Nottingham in Robin Hood.




[1] National Archives C 133/17/1


1277 - Richard de Rokeley (de la Rokele) died seised of this Mannor of Beckenham, in the fifth year of Edward the first (1277)The original Etymologie of Rokeley extracted from Rochel in France.  (Philipot).  Although similar to Ruxley there is apparently no connection as Ruxley is derived from the family of Rokesle but there are instances of confusion between the two names. Philipot derived his source from the following Calendar of Post Mortem Inquisitions

Post Mortem Inquisition; Richard de la Rokele. Writ to Ralph de Sandwyco the king's steward, 8 April, 5 Edw. I. Kent. Inq. 14 April, 5 Edw. I.(1277)
Becghenham. The manor, held of the king in  for 1 knight's fee.
He died on the morrow of St. Nicholas in the said year. Philip his firstborn son, aged 30 and more, is his heir.
Writ to Richard de Holebroc, the king's steward, 8 April, 5 Edw. 1.
Essex. Inq. (undated.)
Crustwick. The manor, held of the king in chief by service of 12d. yearly.
Wokindon Rokele. The manor, held of the earl of Hereford for 1 knight's fee.
Heir as above.
(BHO)

1288 - Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds; Grant by William Peverel, mercer, of London, to Simon de Wychingham, mercer, of the same, of all the tenement in Bekenham, which he had of the demise of Richard de la Esthalle, paying certain rents to the prior and convent of the Holy Trinity, London, and to others (named). Witnesses:- Sir Ralph de Sandwyco, warden of London, William de Hereford, and Thomas de Stanes, sheriffs of the same, and others (named): [Kent?]. [16 Edward I.] Reference E 40/4891 (TNA/BHO?)

1295 - Beckenham Manor; Post Mortem Inquisition; 258.PHILIP DE LA ROKELE. Writ, 5 Oct. 23 Edw. I.(1295) nq. 18 Oct. 23 Edw. I.
ESSEX. Wokyndon. A messuage &c., 400a. arable, 24a. meadow, 30a. pasture. 10a. heath, a windmill, 33s. 10d. rent of free tenants, 8l. 6s. 2d. rent of customers, and works, with geese, cocks and hens, held of Humphrey de Bonn earl of Hertford (sic) by service of 3 1/2 knights’ fees.
Maud his daughter, aged 10, is his next heir.
KENT.inq. Friday after St Luke, 23 Edw. I. Beghenham. The manor (extent given) held of the king in chief by service of a knight’s fee.
Herst. 40a. arable held of the abbot of Westminster by service of 20s. yearly.
Heir as above, aged 9 1/2 years.C. Edw. I. File 71. (8.)

Philipot stated that Richard de Rokeley(Rokele) was succeeded in the Possession of Beckenham Manor by Philip de la Rokeley, and he held it likewise at his Death, which happened in the 23rd year of Edw. the first,(1294) and left it to his Sole Daughter and Heir Isolda de la Rokeley matched to William Bruin, by whom She had Issue Sir Maurice Bruin, Chamberlaine to K. Edw.the third, honoured with the Summons to Parliament as Baron amongst the Peers of this Realm, also sheriff of Essex second year of Henry VI (Philipot)
But  evidence in the post mortem inquisition shows that Philipot is wrong about Isolda and it was Maud de la Rokeley, daughter of Philip, later married to Maurice Bruyn/Brune who carried Beckenham Manor and Wokyndon(Ockendon, Essex) to the Bruyn family. The confusion may lie in the fact that Maud was a minor and the father of her future husband, William Brun was married to Isolda but it doesn't fully answer the difference. Evidence shows that Maud, aged 9.1/2 here was married at about age 12 and may already have been a widow when marrying Maurice Bruyn. Betrothals and marriages were often performed on adolescents to ensure inheritance of property.
Philip is survived by his widow Joan who holds the land in dower during her daughter's minority or until married. Joan remarries to Richard Chiggewelle and the daughter Maud becomes his stepdaughter and ward until her marriage to Maurice le Bruyn.

The National Archive has reference to a Post Mortem Inquisition: Philip de la Rokeley,  23 Edward I (1294) Beghenham Kent the manor (extent given) held of the king in chief by service of a knight’s fee. Herst (Clayherst?) 40a of arable held of the Abbot of Westminster by service of 20s yearly. Heir Maud his daughter aged 9 and a half.[1]

National Archives – Kent Hundred Rolls 1274/5


[1] https://www.forgottenbooks.com/en/download/Calendar_of_Inquisitions_Post_Mortem_and_Other_Analogous_Documents_v3_1000689559.pdf


1301 - We have a slight conundrum here in that the Manor of Beckenham was said to held by the Rokeles but the Battle Abbey Role by the Duchess of Cleveland differs. But as that was written in 1889 we might assume it perpetuates some inaccuracies which originated in Philipot and repeated in Hasted. The publication states:

"Rokell : from Rochelle in the Cotentin. "In 1130 Humfrid de Rochella had lands in Dorset; in 1165 we find William de Rochelle in Essex (Rot. Pip. Lib. Niger). The former witnessed the charter of William de Mandeville, Earl of Essex, founding Walden Abbey" (Mon. i. 460).—The Norman People. South-Okendon, or Wokyndon, in Essex, took its name of Rokele from its ancient owners. The above-mentioned William held it in the reign of Henry II. of Hugh de Eu, under Geoffrey de Mandeville: "in some deeds he is styled William de Eu. Probably he married a daughter of Hugh, and so came into this manor. The capital Seat was a stately one, not far from the Church, on the right hand side of the road leading to Warley and Burntwood."—Morants Essex. He was succeeded by Sir Richard de la Rokele, at whose death in 1222, the manor was confirmed to his son, to be held by knight's service of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford. There were only two more heirs; the last, Philip, died in 1295, leaving two daughters and coheirs, Maud and Isolda. Maud was married to Lord Grey; and "Isolda brought Wokyndon Rokele in marriage to Sir William de Brune, of the Bed-Chamber to King Ed. I., who was so much in favour with that Prince, that he gave him the Manor of Beckingham in Kent: And his wife, Isolda, who was Lady of the Bed-Chamber to Queen Alianor, obtained also from her several lordships."—Ibid, The arms of Rokele were Lozengy, Gules; whereas the De la Rochelles of Normandy (according to Drouet-Darcq's Armorial de la France) in 1360 bore two bends Argent with seven escallops.

The name is found in several other counties. Grangevilles Rockells, in Norfolk, was granted in the thirteenth century by Sir Richard de Rokele (perhaps the same who was seated in Essex) to Reginald de Kareville, as the marriage portion of his daughter Alice.—Blomfield. Richard de la Rokele, joint Lord of Flitcham-cum-Appleton, Oulton, and Walton, was knight of the shire in 1311 and 1314; and Godfrey de la Rokele held at Colney, Tibbenham, and Aslacton, in the same county in 1316. Besides these, I find mentioned in Palgrave's Parliamentary Writs, Humphrey de la Rochelle, of Frilsham and Marsham, Berkshire; Robert de la Rokele of Astwood in Buckinghamshire, Martin de la Rokele, one of the Justices appointed in that county in 1309; and John de la Rokele, of Holland in Yorkshire, one of the "Fideles" of Ireland, who received a writ of military summons in 1322. Another Essex manor, Coggeshall Rokells, bore their name."

William Bruyn died in 1301 and the 1295 entry says Philip de la Rokele's daughter Maud was 9 at that time. The source material for the Battle Abbey Role cannot be investigated but the post mortem inquisition record (see 1295) throws some doubt upon it ie. "Maud his daughter aged 9.1/2".

1302 - Manor of Beckenham: GRANTOR: Executors of Henry le Waleys, citizen of London. GRANTEE: Nuns Minoresses (Juliana, abbess). PLACE OR SUBJECT: Grant, indented, of a tenement called `Bekenham' in the city of London. COUNTY: London. (National Archive). There is reference to Henry le Waleys acquiring Beckenham Manor with associated property in the City. Given that  several Beckenham incumbents were Mayors or Aldermen of London this is very likely. Various transfers of property over  the years may have added or separated parts of the Manor. As we believe the manor to have been leased and sub-leased on a regular basis then this grant looks like le Waleys donating rents to the Priory/Prioress.

Maud de la Rokele who was heiress to Beckenham Manor would be about 16 years of age. The possibility exists that the Rokeles or Bruyns leased to Henry le Waleys who then sub-leased. Bearing in mind that  the Rokeles and Bruyns treated Essex estates as a primary base along with the properties in Hampshire with Beckenham being mainly and income generator from rents.


1303 - Langley?: John de Malmains said to have possessed Langley is sued for debt by inquisition. From a Latin document, source: National Archive. Whether a connection exists is speculative.

Debtor: John Malmaines {Malemeyns}, knight, of Kent [held parts of fees in Eastry Hundred, Kent], and William de Brenton {?Brampton] of Kent.

Creditor: Geoffrey de Conduit, citizen of London.

Amount: £30.

Before whom: John le Blund, Mayor of London; Henry de Leicester, Clerk.

First term: 22/07/1303

Last term: 22/07/1303

Writ to: Sheriff of Kent

Sent by: John le Blund, Mayor of London; Henry de Leicester, Clerk.


1307 - King Edward II until 1327



1308 - Penge/Kenthouse but connected to Joan Bruyn, wife of Maurice by her second marriage to Richard Chyggewell?: Close Rolls; March 20.Westminster. John Tolomer came before the king, on Friday next after the feast of St. Benedict the Abbot last past, and sought to replevy to Robert de Chyggewelle his land in Batricheseye, taken into the king's hands for the said Robert's default before the justices of the Bench against Walter Fraunceys. This was signified to the said justices.

March 23.Westminster.The same John came before the king, on Friday next before the feast of the Annunciation, and sought to replevy to himself the land of the said Robert in Batrichesseye and Beghhonham, which land was taken, etc. 

Robert Chyggewelle was the son of Richard Chiggewell who had married the widowed Joan Bruyn, Joan dies in 1324 holding the land life.


1308 - Repair of church at Beckenham. Trespass cutting down of trees. William Bush parson of Beckenham v. John de Ponton, Richard de Langele sr, Ralph de Steineshull,(Stommeshulle?) William son of Richard de Langele sr, Walter le Lunge, Adam Wythel, William Fraunceys, John Anketyn, William de Berkhamstede, Robert de Langele, Henry Altherman, Richard Aylmere, Ralph Aylmere, Thomas Aylmere & Gilbert de Crokedenne. John de Ponton, Richard de Langele sr, and Ralph de Steineshull justify as wardens of the work of the church of Beckenham; because the interior of the church needed repair, they with the others as parishioners of the church and by the consent, license, and will of the parson cut the trees and took them to the church to repair the church. No verdict. [30]

http://aalt.law.uh.edu/E2/KB27no194/bKB27no194dorses/IMG_0430.htm

The transcript of the name Ralph Steineshull could be wrong and it may be Ralph Stomeshull which we believe is the same as Stommeshulle which appears in the Lay Subsidy Roll of 1334 and we have connected that with the latter day placename of Stumpshill.


1313 - Post Mortem Inquisition; WILLIAM DE BLIBURGH.Writ, 12 March, 6 Edw. II.

Inq. made at Bromlegh on Sunday, 18 March, 6 Edw. II. Bromlygh.

A messuage, 2a. garden, 1 1/2a. wood, 3a. 3r. meadow, 26a. arable, and 3a. alder-wood, held of the bishop of Rochester by service of rendering 5s. yearly and suit of court.
Hese. (Hayes) 4 1/2a. pasture held of the prior of Christ Church, Canterbury, by service of rendering 1 1/2d. yearly.
Beghenham. (Beckenham) 2a. wood and 20a. arable, held of Maurice le Brun by service of rendering 5s. 4d. yearly.
Agnes de Blyburgh,(niece) aged 35, the wife of Richard de Donlee, and daughter of Amy (Amie) sister of the said William, is his next heir; the jury know not of any co-heirs.


This indicates a sub-tenant of Maurice le Brun  for a relatively small piece in Beckenham but one could guess that  the land might be connected on the Beckenham, Bromley, Hayes borders approx. 62 acres in all. However we find on later maps that  land holding were not always contiguous, having outlying fields and plots. The names Bliburgh and Donlee  could be researched further. Bliburgh/Blyburgh held Simpsons Place in Bromley and reputedly had a licence to crenalate or fortify his house. Its not known but one could assume the Beckenham and Hayes property to have been bordering his Simpsons Place property.

(BHO/E.L.Horsburgh)



1317 - Patent Rolls:March 10. York. Licence, after inquisition ad quod damnum taken by Master Richard de Clare, king's clerk, escheator beyond Trent for John Abel to enclose a way leading from Gadeford (Cadeford/Catford) to Beghenham (Bekenham) under his dwelling place of Cypenham (Sibenham/Sydenham) in Leuesham (Lewisham) for the enlargement of his said dwelling place, provided he make another sufficient way in his own soil containing 70 perches of land in length and 24 feet in width.
This could be in the viscinity of Kent House?

1319 - "Langley in this Parish is a second Seat of eminent Account, which was in elder Times the Possession of John de Malmains, who obtained a Charter of Free-Warren to his Lands in Bekenham, in the twelfth year of Edward the second." (source: Philipot).
 
Free warren is a type of franchise or privilege conveyed by a sovereign in medieval England to an English subject, promising to hold them harmless for killing game of certain species within a stipulated area, usually a wood or small forest.

Hasted tells us: This place (Langley) afterwards came into the possession of the family of Malmaines, who were settled at Waldershare in this county, in the time of the Conqueror. John de Malmaines obtained a charter of free warren for his lands in Begenham, in the 12th year of king Edward II (1319) which was renewed to Henry Malmaines, of Cliffe, in the 3d year of king Edward III (1330). It appears by the Book of Aid, in the 20th year of king Edward III (1347) that Nicholas Malmains held half a knight's fee of the king in Begenham. He died, in the 23d year of that reign, possessed of much land in this county; (fn. 23) before the end of which, the property of this manor was transferred by sale to Langley, a name most probably taken from this place, though the family itself has been long since extinct. These Langleys of Beckingham were, most probably, a distinct family from those of Knowlton in this county, who were originally descended from a family of that name in the county of Warwick. (Hasted)

1319 - A record from Edward II's time; July 2nd York; Enrolment of deed of John de Poton of Beghenham acknowledging receipt from Master Henry de Clyff of 20l. for Michaelmas term, 12 Edward II., in full payment of 200 marks due to him from Henry for certain lands in Beghenham that Henry had of his feoffment. Witnesses; Sir William de Ayremynne; Master John de Blebury; Michael de Wych'; Walter de Scorby; Thomas le Vendour of York. Dated at York, 4 July, in the above year.Memorandum, that John came into chancery at York, on the said day, and acknowledged the above deed. (BHO)

1324 - Beckenham, Foxgrove? Kenthouse?; Post Mortem Inquisition; JOAN, LATE THE WIFE OF RICHARD DE CHIGGEWELL alias DE CHYKEWELLE. (Joan also widow of Philip de la Rokele and mother of Maud Bruyn)

Writ, 15 October, 18 Edward II. Inq. Sunday after All Saints, 18 Edward II. Beghenham. A messuage and 140a. land, which the said Richard acquired to himself, the said Joan, and the heirs of the said Richard, held for life by the said Joan of Maurice de Brun by service of 11s. yearly, and rendering 1lb. pepper to Thomas Bardolf yearly; and 120a. land held for life, by acquisition (de acquisito) with the abovesaid Richard, of the said Maurice by divers services.
Leuesham. 40a. land similarly held for life of the prior of Leuesham by service of 12s. yearly.
Robert his son, aged 40 and more, is next heir of the said Richard.

Other evidence shows Kenthouse on the Lewisham/Sydenham borders underpinning my view that this relates to Kenthouse. This is among the many assumptions we are tempted to conclude. This 140a matches Kenthouse in 1346

Richard de Chigwell was an owner of ships, quays, mills and had a large staff of agents and an alderman. They handled hanseatic timber, cloth, wool, wine and massive quantities of grain. He held property in 6 London parishes as well as in Kent & Essex and was the third highest taxpayer in 1292[1]. He died in 1306. Joan, his wife, was daughter of Simon de Gardino and appears to have died in 1324 and her will survives. He was appointed wardship (as godfather) to Maud daughter of Philip de la Rochelle (Rokele) and she is supposed to have married Maurice le Bruyn by 1300[2].  

On evidence it would seem that Maud (aka Matilda) married Maurice at the age of about 14, there is evidence of an inquest about this[3]. An Isolda (Isuelt) appears to have been married to Maurice’s father Sir William Bruyn[4] and therefore to be mother of Maurice.  



[1] https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=hmfZlJ4hi-0C&pg=PA166&lpg=PA166&dq=%22richard+de+chigwell%22+kent&source=bl&ots=p5XkU2S92r&sig=ACfU3U1FEKCAVwl_xOoEOGMKGM_Gj7LsEA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjvn4qYo9PoAhWLasAKHXy5A8sQ6AEwAnoECAsQLg#v=onepage&q=%22richard%20de%20chigwell%22%20kent&f=false

[2] https://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/essex/vol7/pp117-126

[3] https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=inFEAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA97&dq=maurice+le+bruin+marriage+age+inquiry&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj67KbXut7oAhUJCsAKHU2nBTAQ6AEIKTAA#v=onepage&q=maurice%20le%20bruin%20marriage%20age%20inquiry&f=false

[4] https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=w4MgAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA214&dq=isolda+bruyn&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixuo2ertPoAhUKAcAKHW3QDLIQ6AEIazAI#v=onepage&q=isolda%20bruyn&f=false

1327 - King Edward III (until 1377)

1328 - Part of Beckenham Manor; Post Mortem Inquisition: WILLIAM LE LATYMER, LE LATIMER, or LATIMER.  Writ, 2 March, 1 Edward III.  Inq. 11 March, 1 Edward III.  Asshe. The manor (extent given), held of the heir of John de Mouubrai by service of a quarter of a knight’s fee and rendering at the said heir’s manor of Ryerhs (Ryarsh) for the ward of the castle of Rochester 24s. yearly.
Bromlegh. 2 messuages, lands, and a water-mill (extent given), including a tenement called Blakebrok, held of the bishop of Rochester by service of 8s. yearly, and doing suit at his court of Bromlegh every three weeks; and 3a. of marsh pasture held of the prior of Christchurch, Canterbury, by service of 4d. yearly.
Beghenham. 57a. arable and 3a. marsh pasture, held of Maurice de Brun by service of 10s. 3d. yearly, and doing suit at his court of Beghenham every three weeks.
William his son, aged 26 years, is his next heir.

This shows a tenancy under Maurice de Brun (le Bruyn) for part of Beckenham Manor. Marsh pasture implies a waterside position. Doing suit at court is unclear whether it meant taking part in proceedings or a periodic payment, perhaps both? However this three weekly procedure could imply le Brun holds something akin to a magistrates court and is in residence at least regularly at Beckenham. Similarly, Latimer had the obligation for the same service to the Bishop of Rochester at Bromley.

The source from Proceedings of the Battle Conference 1991 speculates that Robert Latimer was connected with Ansgot of Rochester circa Domesday 1086 and may have been English rather than Norman and possibly acting as an interpreter. I'm speculating that William may be descended or related but the description 'le Latimer' could imply its applied to anyone able to interpret/write in Latin.

1329 - Foxgrove etc.  July 12th Chichester; Grant of special grace to Henry d Clyf and his heirs. Free Warren in all their demesne lands in Begenham co. Kent, and Grove co. Nottingham.
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=inu.30000086172677&view=1up&seq=143

1330 Langley purchased by Henry de Cliffe, "to whom they accrued by Purchase from Malmains, in the third year of Edward the third;(1330) but stayed not long in the Tenure of this Family. (see 1319) (Philipot and Hasted).  But is this questionable as a will for de Cliffe of 1331 leaves Foxgrove to a nephew with no mention of Langley or any other Beckenham property unless of course Foxgrove included Langley at this time.

Henry de Cliffe is mentioned in https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=wtoPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA246&dq=henry+de+Cliffe&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiCmYeJn43mAhWKT8AKHRfOCwIQ6AEIKjAA

Henry de Clyf is listed in the Lay Subsidy Roll for Beckenham in 1334 as a landowner as are the Langley family. Philipot, repeated by Hasted say that the Langley family purchased the Langley estate in 1377 so we are still looking for the documentary evidence for the lands owned by de Clyf and before him by Malmaines

1331 - Foxgrove; The will of Henry de Cliffe (Clyf). Among several legacies of money and belongings he says;  to Henry the son of John de Clyff, to whom I assign my manor of Foxgrove, and other lands and tenements in the Bekenham,

This will describes Henry wishing to be buried in the diocese of York perhaps indicating that Foxgrove was not his domicile. His position is King's clerk (or one of them). As de Cliffe(Clyf)  has been linked to Langley by some writers it remains unclear whether other lands  and tenements in Bekenham include Langley or parts of it.

1333 - Court of Chancery; Debtor John de Vienne of Beckenham, of Kent. Creditor John Jakelot, butcher of London. Amount £40. Before whom: John de Pulteney, Mayor of London, Henry de St Osyth. (National Archive).

Vienne derived from a placename in France. £40 would have been a large sum of money. We can only remain curious about the reasons for such a debt. 

1333 - Bromley; Enrolment of release by Conan son of Henry, knight, to Richard Lacer, citizen of London, and Juliana his wife, of his right in the manors of Biomlegh (Bromlegh) and Blakebrok and in all their appurtenances, which Conan had by the gift of William le Latimer, knight, in co. Kent, in exchange for the manor of Liverton, to hold of the chief lords of the fee by the accustomed services. Witnesses: Maurice de Brune, Bartholomew Fanacourt, William Carbonel, knights, Thomas de Bakewell, Thomas Herwald, Robert de Ely, William Moraunt, Henry Darcy of London. Dated at Bromlegh, eo. Kent, on Sunday, after the octaves of the Purification, 7 Edward III. Memorandum, that the said Conan came into chancery at York on 5 March and acknowledged the preceding deed. (BHO, Bromlegh mistyped or mistranscribed)

This connects to Lacer/Bruyn and Marny some years later and Maurice Brune the same as Bruyn. Maurice Brune was the father of William Brune/Bruyn who married Richard Lacer's daughter Alice.


1334 Beckenham (all of); Lay Subsidy Roll Taxation record: This source of information may give some clues to the derivations of local names. In the list of names we find John and Ralph Stomeshulle from which could be derived Stumpshill, Cleyhurst is perhaps a basis for Clay Hill, Langel and Langele as the source of Langley and Eylmer for Elmers End, Humfray for Humphrey. Then it gets less obvious: ie Hauek for Hawk as in Hawksbrook? The Roll has 48 names for Beckenham paying a total of £7.30 in tax.

Some of the names in the Lay Subsidy Roll are mentioned in Philipot’s and Hasted’s histories, such as Bruyn and Langley. We are at the mercy of other researchers who may find and publish other records be bearing in mind that information may be in old English or even Latin. (source:https://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/KRV/18/3/140.htm )

Philipot had stated about Langley, the name and place: before the going out of Edward the third,(1377) I find the Propriety invested by Sale in Langley, to which Family the Foundation of that House owes in part its Original, on which they ingraffed their own Name, which hath flourished under that Title ever since, though the Family be withered away and gone, the last of which Name at this place was Ralph Langley, who with Roger Twisden, Stephen Monins, Edward Monins, John Edingham or Engham, Richard Edingham, John Berton of Cotmanton in Shouldon, John Berham, John Betenham of Shurland in Pluckley, and others, Gentlemen of prime Rank in this County, were summoned to appear before Robert Poynings and John Perry, in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth,(1434) to disclaim the Title of the House of York, and this Ralph died in the year 1451, and ordered Langley and other demeasns at Bekenham to be sold for the discharging his Debts, the purport and Effects of which Will were accordingly performed, and his Estate at Bekenham and Langley, passed away by Sale to John Violett,

1346 - Beckenham/Foxgrove ?; Book of Aid to the Black Prince (Archaeologica Cantana) mentions Joan Rokesle and John de Foxegrave; ASSESSMENTS IN KENT; Hundred de.BromKegh.e et Weghenhatn (Beghenham.)
de heredibus Johanne de Rokesle et Johannis de Foxegrave pro dimidio feodo quod predicti Johanna et Johannes tenuerunt in Beghenham Summa xlj s.viij. d. pro j f. et xvi parte j. f. 

https://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/ArchCant/010%20-%201876/010-13.pdf

translation; on behalf of the heirs of John (Joan) de Rokesle and a half of the fee of John de Foxegrave Beghenham that the aforesaid Joan and John have taken hold of in the sum of xij s.viij. d. for j f. and sixteen point j f

1346 - Kent House: April 26.Westminster.
Enrolment of deed testifying that whereas Master Henry de Clyf, clerk, deceased, lately granted by his deed to Henry de Seccheford, now deceased, and Alice his wife to hold a messuage, 140 acres of land called Kenthouse in Beghenham, co. Kent, of him, rendering 40s. yearly to him, so that if Henry and Alice should die without an heir of their bodies, the messuage and land should remain to Hugh son of John de Balne, and Master Henry granted by his deed to Hugh the said 40s. yearly, Hugh has released to Alice, who now holds the messuage and land, the said 40s. rent and all his right and claim in the messuage and land. Witnesses: Sir Maurice le Brune, Sir William le Brune, knights, John de Huntyngfeld, Peter Godesone, Andrew de Seccheford, Hugh le Hatter of Croidon, John le Mazon of Beghenham. Dated at Beghenham on Wednesday after St. Mark, 1346.
Memorandum that Hugh came into chancery at Westminster on 27 April and acknowledged the preceding deed. (BHO)

1346 - Richard le Lacer is Mayor of the City of London. resides or has property in Bromley, is father of Alice Lacer who married Sir William Bruyn.

1347 - The Black Death

Linked by Len Hevey to the decline of Beckenham Manor and possible ruin of the manor house at this time. The Black Death, subesequently identified as bubonic plague did not disappear completely and there were periodic outbreaks. Although the 'Great Plague of 1665' was most notorious we have the accounts of John Evelyn the diarist describing 'pestilences'. Coupled with other diseases such as smallpox, measles, typhoid, typhus, whooping cough, diptheria etc etc. then the death toll was high keeping the population growth in check. Evelyn also describes years of crop failures due to variation in climate such as either extremely cold, wet or dry summers and  arctic winters freezing crops in the ground and resulting in 'Frost Fairs' on the frozen Thames. More suitable in this timeline in the 17th Century but certainly these variable conditions occurred throughout history. Some protagonists in this history timeline are believed to have succumbed to plague but can only be assumed by the time of their deaths coinciding with known outbreaks. To return to Evelyn he describes the deaths of several of his children due to fevers which might be scarlet fever or associated with the other diseases.

1355 - Manor of Beckenham: Sir Maurice Bruyn/Bruin, Chamberlaine to K. Edw. the third, honoured with the Summons to Parliament as Baron amongst the Peers of this Realm,who by a Right derived to him from his Mother, was possest of Beckenham Manor at his Death, in the twenty ninth of Edward the third, (1355) and transmitted a wide and spreading Revenue to his Posterity here, at Southokenden in Essex, and at Roumere in Hantshire, which last was given in Appendage to a younger Son, from whom the Bruins of Athelhampton in the County of Dorset, are lineally descended. But when after a fair continuance this Family had flourished at this Place, the Distaffe prevailed against the Speare, (female heirs only) (source: Philipot) (seen Henry Bruyn and his daughters, Alice and Elizabeth)


Recent (2020) evidence may challenge this as the 'right derived' to Beckenham Manor may be from his wife, Maude de la Rokeley according to family tree information. His mother Isolda may be of unknown family name and is said to be of the house of Queen Eleanor from another source (Victoria History/BHO/Rowner Hants) who was the mother of Maurice and not apparently from the Rokeley family.
This 1355 Post Mortem Inquisition raises a question as it says Beghenham, the manor held of the king, perhaps because the 'held of the king' passed from Philip de la Rokele  via his daughter Maude. But does not use the same phrase for Wokyndon Rokele.

MAURICE LE BRUYN or LE BRUNE Writ, 24 March, 29 Edward III. Inq. taken at Derteforde, 27 March, 29 Edward III.
Beghenham. The manor held of the king in chief by service of a knight’s fee; 100a. heath held of the abbot of Westminster by service of 20s.
He held no more lands in the county.
He died on 17 March last. William his son, aged 40 years and more, is his heir.
Writ, 24 March, 29 Edward III. Inq. taken at Wokyndon Rokele, 1 April, 29 Edward III. Wokyndon Rokele. The manor (extent given), with the advowson of the church, held for life by the law of England after the death of Maud, sometime his wife, of the inheritance of William, their son and heir, of the earl of Hereford by knight’s service.
He held no other lands &c. in the county.
Date of death and heir as above.
Writ, 24 March, 29 Edward III. Inq. taken at Suthfarham, Wednesday in Easter week, 29 Edward III.
Fordyngbrigg. The manor (extent given) held of the king in chief of the honour of Camel by service of a third part of a knight’s fee.
Rowenore. The manor (extent given) held of the king in chief by service of the serjeanty of rendering 40s. yearly in the castle of Winchester.
Tycchefeld. A liberty called ‘Crofton’ within the hundred, held of the earl of Rychemond, service not known.
He died on Tuesday after St. Gregory, 29 Edward III. William le Bruyn, knight, aged 30 years and more, is his heir.
(Source BHO)

1355 - Foxgrove:  Bartholomew de Burgherssh, Lord Burwash dies in possession of Foxgrove and several other properties. He died on 3 August last. Bartholomew de Burgherssh, knight, his son, aged 26 years, is his heir.(Philipot). But this taken from the Inquisition Post Mortem maybe contradicts who holds Foxgrove in 1355 as Burghersh is renting various parts?

Inquisition. taken at Mallyng, Monday the feast of St. Matthew, 29 Edward III.(1355) Foxgrove. The manor held of Thomas Bardolf by service of 6s. 8d. yearly, the abbot of Gaunt by service of 5s. yearly, William Bruyn, knight, by service of 56s. 6d. yearly, and of the heir of Richard le Hauk by service of 16d. yearly.

Inquisition Post Mortem BARTHOLOMEW DE BURGHERSSH THE ELDER.Writ, 6 August, 29 Edward III.Inq. taken at Mallyng, Monday the feast of St. Matthew, 29 Edward III.

Shoford. The manor held of the archbishop of Canterbury by service of a fourth part of a knight’s fee, of the prior of Ledys by service of 5s. yearly, of Robert Vynter by service of 2s. 10d., and of Thomas Colpeper by service of 8d. yearly.
Chidyngston. The manor held of the same archbishop by service of 6s. 1 1/2d. yearly, of the abbot of Gaunt by service of 23 3/4d., of Reynold de Cobeham, knight, by service of 18s. 2 1/2d. yearly, of John de Beauchamp, knight, by service of 3d. yearly, Ralph de Frenyngham, knight, by service of 14s. yearly, Oliver Brokas by service of 5d. yearly, John Cook by service of 11d. yearly, Robert Chaloner by service of 2s. 3d. yearly, and the heirs of Robert de Hanedenn by service of 10 1/2d. yearly.
Heandenn. The manor held of Ralph, earl of Stafford, by service of 56s. 11d. and six hens yearly, Ralph de Frenyngham, knight, by service of 36s. 1 1/2d. yearly, Otho de Grandissono, knight, by service of 7s. 9 3/4d. yearly, John de Cobham, knight, and Oliver Brokas by service of 3s. yearly, Alan de Chelescombe by service of 14d. yearly, and Robert Bothel by service of 8d. yearly.
Foxgrove. The manor held of Thomas Bardolf by service of 6s. 8d. yearly, the abbot of Gaunt by service of 5s. yearly, William Bruyn, knight, by service of 56s. 6d. yearly, and of the heir of Richard le Hauk by service of 16d. yearly.
Plumpstede. The manor held jointly with Elizabeth his wife, to them and the heirs of the said Bartholomew, of the abbot of St. Augustine’s, Canterbury, by service of 52s. yearly, Giles de Beauchamp, knight, and Nicholas Burnel, knight, by service of 12s. 1d. yearly, John son of Humphrey de Cobham, by service of 4s. 4 1/2d. yearly, and of the church of Plumpstede by service of 2s. 7 1/2d. yearly.
He died on 3 August last. Bartholomew de Burgherssh, knight, his son, aged 26 years, is his heir.
Writ
, 13 August, 29 Edward III.



1356 was the year of the Battle of Crecy.

1358 - Beckenham Manor DocumentTranscription; (the first part gives us the name of the parson of Beckenham and indicates that several advowsons and livings from parishes or manorscould be held by one churchman)
Fine levied in the octaves of St. John the Baptist, 31 Eds.III. (1358) between William de Bruyn, Knt, and Alice his wife complainants (by Edmund Barnabe, the attorney of the said Alice), and Robert Sanlo (de Sancto Laudo), parson of beghenham, deforciant, touching the manor of  Wokyndon Rokell the advowsons of the church and chapel of the same town, and of the hospital of St. John de Broke.

Deed poll of Joan late wife of Thomas de Overton, and daughter of the late lord William Bruyn, knt, dated 20 Mar. 45 Eds. III.,(1372) releasing to Robert de Marny, knt., and his wife Alice, her (Joan’s) mother, and her (Joan’s) brothers Ingram and Richard, all claim on the manors of Southwokyndon (Essex), Bekenham (Kent), Rounore, Migham (Hants), and Randolveston (Dorset).

Fine levied in the octaves of the Purification, 50 Edw.III., (1377) between Robert de Marny, knt., and his wife Alice, Complainants, and Warren de Eyrdale and Joan his wife, deforciants, touching a messuage and lands in Stifford, and two parts of the advowson of the church of the same town.

Deed poll of Ingram Bruyn, son and heir of William Bruyn, knt., dated Tuesday next after the feast of St.John the Baptist, 1377, granting to Robert de Marny, knt., and Alice his wife (the grantor’s mother), the said manors of Southwokyndon (Essex), Bekenham (Kent), and advowson of the church of the same town, the manors of Rounor, Fordyngbrigge (Hants), and Randolveston (Dorset). [Norman].

Deed poll of Ingram Brun, dated 1 July 1377?, discharging Robert de Marny from the covenants of a certain indenture made 15 Nov., 48 Edw.III (1375) (between dame Katherine de la Pole, late wife of William de la Pole, knt., and his son Edmond de la Pole, knt., of the one part and the said Robert de Marny, knt.. of the other part.

Fine levied in the octaves of the Holy Trinity, 12 Ric. II., (1389) between the said Robert de Bourton parson of Southwokyndon, John Coly, parson of Stifford, and John Martham, parson of Bekenham, complainants, and Robert de Marny, knt., and Alice his wife, deforciants, touching the manors of Forthingbrigg and Rouenore, and lands in Forthingbrigg and Brouneandevere, and the advowson of the church of Rouenore, (Hants), the manor of Randolveston? (Dorset), and Bekenham (Kent). And the advowson of the church of the same manor.

Tripartite indenture, dated 2 Mar,. 16 Ric. II., (1393) whereby (after reciting the previous deeds, etc., as well as the death of the said John Colyn) John Martham, parson of  Bekenham, limits the manor and advowson of the church of Bekenham (Kent), and the manor of Forthingbrigge (Hants), and a toft and plough-land called Godeshull, in the town of Forthingbrigge (Hants), and the manor of Randolveston? (Dorset), to Robert de Marny, for life, with remainder to Ingram Brun in tail maile, in default to the said William de Marny, and the other remainders noticed in the preceeding deed.

Power of attorney, dated 2 March, 16 Ric.II., (1393) from the said John Martham parson of Bekenham to William Aylmar and John Payne, to deliver seizing of the lands mentioned in the preceeding deed to Robert de Marny, kt.

1360 - Beckenham Manor; Regarding Sir Robert de Marney, second husband of Alice le Lacer, widow of William Bruyn. This extract says Maurice Bruyn but I think that is an error based on other sources.

During a respite from military service, the rapacious Sir Robert set his sights on the extensive Bruyn estates. In 1360 he had obtained from Sir Maurice (William?) Bruyn and his wife, Alice, an annual rent of £40 from their manor of South Ockendon, Essex, having already acquired all their interests there and at Beckenham in Kent for a period of 15 years. Bruyn died two years later, and in 1363 Marney joined the widow in purchasing, for £200, the wardship and marriage of her son Ingram Bruyn, heir not only to the estates in Essex and Kent but also to Ranston (Dorset) and Rowner (Hampshire). He then married Alice and persuaded Ingram when he came of age in 1375 to confer on them the whole of his inheritance for term of their lives. Meanwhile, Marney had negotiated Ingram’s marriage to the elder daughter of Sir Edmund de la Pole*, brother of the future earl of Suffolk. Marney’s alliance with Alice Bruyn had also brought him very substantial properties in London and Kent which she inherited after the death of her father, Richard Lacer, a wealthy mercer and former mayor of the City. Even before her marriage to Marney, Alice had entrusted her property to his feoffees, who in 1365 assisted him to negotiate with her sister Katherine, widow of John atte Pole of Shoreditch, a partition of the Lacer estate in his favour. The Marneys sold some of these holdings in 1374 and settled a few others on Ingram Bruyn in the following year. (Source: History of Parliament, recommended read of the full article)


This is an example of the errors or mismatches in information that we have to sort through. Although the description of de Marneys activities is enlightening names do get transposed.

1360 - Writing of William Brun knight, granting to Richard atte Seler and John Maryns citizens of London and to their assigns a yearly rent of 20l. to be taken of his whole manor of Bekenham co. Kent and of all other his lands there at Easter and Michaelmas by even portions, with power of distraint if the same be in arrear; and William has paid 6d. down in name of seisin. Dated London, 28 November 34 Edward III.

Writing of William Brun knight, granting similarly to Richard atte Seler and John Maryns and to their assigns a yearly rent of 40l. to be taken of his whole manor of Southwokyndon co. Essex and of all other his lands there. Dated (as above).Memorandum of acknowledgment of the foregoing writings, 30 November.

Indenture, made at London 1 December 34 Edward III, between Sir William de Brun knight and Dame Alice his wife of the one part and Richard atte Seler and John Maryns citizens of London of the other part, witnessing that Sir William and Dame Alice have granted and to farm let to Richard and John and to their assigns the manor of Southwokyndon and all other their lands in Southwokyndon co. Essex for fifteen years, rendering 60 marks a year in the church of Southwokyndon within the quinzaine of Michaelmas and the quinzaine of Easter by even portions, and at the end of that term Richard and John shall leave the houses within the close of the said manor in good repair against wind and rain; and William grants that Richard and John and their assigns may cut, lop and carry timber, wood and brushwood as much as they please in all his woods in Bekenham co. Kent when they please during all that term for all expenses to be made in regard to houses, mills, palings, bridges, hays, dikes and enclosures whatsoever in the manor and lands aforesaid and for fuel therein, and shall have ingress and egress in the said woods for that purpose, and that all costs incurred by them thereupon from Michaelmas next for one whole year shall be allowed them in their payments; William and Alice will warrant them the premises during the term aforesaid; they will not sell, alien nor charge the same or any parcel thereof to any person during that term, and if Richard and John suffer distraint by reason of any annuity or charge or for any service in arrear Sir William will within six weeks return the same and make full restitution for their damages and costs; he will not oust, impeach, damage or disturb them of their bargain; and whereas by his writing he has granted them a yearly rent of 40l. in the said manor and an annuity of 20l. in his manor of Bekenham, Richard and John grant that, if Sir William perform the covenants in this indentured contained, those annuities shall be void. French.Memorandum of acknowledgment by the parties, 1 December. (BHO)


1361 - History of Essex/South Ockendon which features in the histories of the Bruyn and Tyrell famililes; Cal. Inq. p.m. iii, p. 163; cf. Cal. Close, 1360–4, 142: the lessee of S. Ockendon may take timber at Beckenham for the repair of S. Ockendon dwellings.


1362 - Beckenham Manor; Death of Sir William le Bruyn. His wife Alice shortly afterwards marries Robert de Marny.
296. WILLIAM BRUYN, knight.
Writ, 8 March, 36 Edward III.
ESSEX. Inq. taken at Wokyndon Rokele, 26 March, 36 Edward III.
Wokyndon Rokele. The manor (extent given), with the advowson of the church, held by the said William jointly with Alice, his wife, by a fine levied in the king’s court, of the earl of Hereford by knight’s service. The extent includes a leet on Tuesday in Whitsun week.
He held no other lands &c. in the county.
He died on 24 February last. Ingram (Ingeramus), son of the said William and Alice, aged 8 years and more, is their heir.
Writ, 8 March, 36 Edward III.
DORSET. Inq. (indented) taken at Blaneford, Monday the morrow of Palm Sunday, 36 Edward III.
Randolfston. The manor (extent given), held jointly by the deceased and Alice his wife, who survives, to them and the heirs of their bodies, by gift of Maurice Bruyn, father of the deceased, whether with the king’s licence or not the jurors know not. The manor is held of the king in chief by knight’s service.
He held no other lands &c. in the county.
Date of death and heir as above.
Writ, 8 March, 36 Edward III.
KENT. Inq. (indented) taken at Beghenham, 19 March, 36 Edward III.
Beghenham. The manor (extent given), with the advowson of the church, held of the king in chief by service of one knight’s fee. Also 100a. heath, held of the abbot of Westminster, as of his manor of Batricheseye, by service of rendering 20s. yearly.
He held no other lands &c. in the county.
Date of death as above. Heir as above, aged 8 years last Christmas.
Writ, 8 March, 36 Edward III.
SOUTHAMPTON. Inq. made at Fordyngbrigg, 6 April, 36 Edward III.
Fordyngbrigg and Migham. The manor (extent given), held of the king in chief, as of the honor of Camel, by service of a third part of a knight’s fee.
Roghenore. The manor (extent given), held of the king in chief by service of grand serjeanty and by paying 40s. yearly at Winchester castle.
Crofton. A liberty so called, in the hundred of Tichefeld, held of the earl of Rychemond by knight’s service, but by what portion of a fee the jurors know not.
(fn. 2) Candover. A messuage and a carucate of land containing 100a. arable, held of the abbot of Hyde by knight’s service, but by what portion of a fee the jurors know not.
Date of death and heir as above.
C. Edw. III. File 168. (27.)
E. Inq. P.M. File 20. (22.) (Hants.)

1365 - Beckenham (Manor) but more likely miscellaneous properties from the estate of Richard le Lacer who was father of Alice (now Marny) and Katherine (now atte Pole); Quitclaim 24/06/1365 Quitclaim from Robert de Marny, Alice his wife, and Robert de Bourton, recently sacristan of the church of Canterbury, of Leyre Marny, and John atte Bregge, to Katherine, widow of John atte Pole of Shoreditch, James Walsshe, clerk, and Gilbert Neal, clerk relating to lands and tenements formerly of Richard Lacer (the older and younger) in Bromley, Beckenham, Hayes, Chislehurst and Lewisham, Kent
[2 broken seals] (source; BromleyHC)

1365 - October; Burghersh and Pavely are connected through family intermarriage and 'members and parcels' connected with the manor of Burghersh might include Beckenham/Foxgrove land.

Charter of Thomas de Aldoun knight, giving with warranty to Sir Bartholomew Burgherssh knight, his heirs and assigns, his manor of Burgherssh with all lands, rents, services etc. thereto belonging. Witnesses: William Hichyngham, John Waleys, John Seint Cler knights, Richard Hurst, John de Asshebournham, Roger de Asshebournham. Dated Henden co. Kent, 3 November 39 Edward III.Writing of Thomas de Aldoun knight, being a quitclaim with warranty to Sir Bartholomew Burgherssh knight, his heirs and assigns, of the manor of Burgherssh with all lands etc. thereto belonging. Witnesses (as the last). Dated Henden co. Kent, 5 November 39 Edward III.

Memorandum of acknowledgment of the foregoing charter and writing, 6 November.

Indenture of accord between Sir Bartholomew de Burghersh and Sir Walter de Pavely of the one part and Sir Thomas Daldoun of the other part touching certain debates and pleas between them moved, that the said Sir Thomas, by fine levied by himself and his wife and otherwise as counsel shall appoint, shall assure to Sir Bartholomew the manor of Burghersh and all members and parcels thereto pertaining discharged of all charges save the lordship of the fee; that the said Sir Walter has released a yearly rent of 40l. which Sir Thomas granted to him and to his heirs for release of certain manors claimed by Sir Walter as his heritage in tail; that he shall also release to Sir Thomas the reversion of the lands of his heritage on his father's side, and not on his mother's side, which ought to come to him in case Sir Thomas should die without issue male of his body, for which release Sir Thomas shall enfeoff Sir Walter and his heirs for ever of the manor of Stoutyng, the appurtenances, members and parcels thereof, with 10l. issuing of parcel of the manor of Boughton and the tenants thereof (who shall be specified by name), of that part (if any) which is not entailed; that so soon as Sir Walter shall be by Sir Thomas enfeoffed of 50l. of land and rent in Kent in a manor of so much clear value by extent, without impeachment of entail or other action or charge, so that Sir Walter shall new build or repair the houses thereof and Sir Thomas shall pay his costs in so doing, Sir Walter shall again enfeoff Sir Thomas of the manor of Stoutyng and the rent aforesaid as fully as he had the same by feoffment of Sir Thomas; and that for performance of this bargain Sir Walter shall give Sir Thomas 100 marks, which sum is fully paid. French.
Memorandum
 of acknowledgment by the parties, 6 November.


1369 - Foxgrove Enfeoffment. The Kings College Archive at Cambridge University has document from 1369 which is an enfeoffment for land including Foxgrove: Enfeoffment by Bartholomew of Burwash to Walter Parely(Paveley), knight, William Steel, Wlliam de Wyndrove, clerks, Thomas Hungerford and John de Gildesburgh, of manors of Braundon (Warwickshire), Haydor (Lincolnshire), Grantchester and Barton (Cambridgeshire), Plumsted, Foxgrove, Hendon, Chedingstone (Kent), Burghersh, Byssh (Sussex), Kersatton (Surrey), Crakemersh (Staffordshire), Boxworth advowson (Leicestershire), hospital in St Peters Parva by Pouleswaif (London) and reversions of manors of Sibelithingham (Essex), Mildenhale (Wiltshire) and Bekeswell (Essex). The seal of Bartholomew of Burwash is attached. Enfeoffment is the granting of land in exchange for a pledge of service. Maybe to provide men at arms but I can only guess at the service to be provided.

174 (f.62, no.vii). Henden. 1 Feb. 1369. Charter of Bartholomew de Burgherssh granting with warranty to Walter Paveley, knight, William Steele and William Wyndesore, clerks, Thomas Hungerford and John de Gildesburgh, the manors of Brandon, Warwickshire, Haydor, Lincolnshire, Grantchester and Barton, Cambridgeshire, Plumstead, Fox Grove, Henden and Chiddingstone, Kent, Burwash, Sussex, Carshalton, Surrey, and Crakemarsh, Staffordshire, the advowson of Market Bosworth, Leicestershire, and his house in the parish of St. Peter, Paul's Wharf, in London, with the reversion of the manors of Sible Hedingham, Essex, which Walter Paveley holds for life, of Mildenhall, Wiltshire, which Thomas Hungerford holds for life, and Bexfields, Essex, which John de Gildesburgh holds for life. Witnesses: Stephen Valoignes, Lawrence Brenlee, Thomas Moriaunt and Thomas Coum (?), knights, John Colpeper, William Apulderfeld, James Pecham.

The two entries above illustrate how Foxgrove was bound up in the extended estates of its owners.

1371 - Writing of Joan who was wife of Thomas de Overton and daughter of Sir William Bruyn knight, being a quitclaim with warranty to Sir Robert de Marny knight, Dame Alice his wife mother of the said Joan, Ingelram and Richard brothers of the said Joan, and the heirs and assigns of the said Ingelram and Richard, of the manors of Southwokyndon co. Essex, Bekynham co. Kent, Rounore and Migham co. Suthampton and Randolveston co. Dorset, now held by the said Sir Robert and Alice. Witnesses: William Essex, John Sely, John Maryns, John Gravele, John Essex, Robert de Bourton parson of Southwokyndon, John de Shropham chaplain, William Mepeshale, Philip atte Bregge. Dated London, 20 March 45 Edward III. (BHO)

Robert de Marny had married the widow Alice of William Bruyn Lord of Beckenham Manor, the manor returns to Ingram/Ingelram Bruyn, presumably on Robert or Alice's death. Alice's maiden name had been le Lacer.


1372 - Beckenham and Bromley; Lease for 9 years 20/09/1372 Lease from Robert de Marny, Alice his wife, Robert de Bourton, parson of South Wekyndon, and Philip atte Bregge, to Roger Prest and John Thornkyn of 2 crofts of which the west is on the London Road, Bromley by the field of the Bishop of Rochester, and a croft called the Rachel, a croft called Chellefeld, the Mellebroke, 2 crofts called Jonestone, Cilmynesbroke and a croft, and land called Mersshland, Bromley (formerly of Richard Lacer, citizen of London)
Lands of Richard Lacer in Beckenham, south of Westbregg Street, land, tenement and customs of .... [missing] Walcy, Bakeresland, and meadow in Bladyngdonemed (Bromley Collections)

Alice who was widow of William Bruyn  was daughter of Sir Richard le Lacer d.1361. If Richard had no sons then his lands descend to any daughters and their husbands. Or the land was part of a marriage settlement. But Richard had a son by the same name and another daughter Katherine. The property of Richard Lacer was divided between the two sisters

1376 - 01/03/1376 Quitclaim from Ingelram Bruyn to Robert de Marny, Knight, and Alice his wife (mother of Bruyn) relating to the Manor of Beckenham, Kent and advowson of church there; manor, called Migham, of Fordingbridge, Hants; all lands and tenements formerly of William Bruyn, knight (Bruyn's father), in Brown Candover (Bromley Collections)

Quitclaim is a transfer of property and this transfers Beckenham Manor from Bruyn to de Marny. As I have said, de Marny was an avaricious individual who is described as being quite ruthless in his actions.

And this Memorandum evidences the same. 51 Edward III. Memorandum of acknowledgment, 30 June this year. Ingram Brun, son and heir of William Brun knight, to Robert Marny knight and Alice his wife, mother of the said Ingram, and to his said mother's heirs and assigns. Charter with warranty of the manor of Southwokyngdon co. Essex, the manor and advowson of Bekynham co. Kent, the manors of Rounor and Fordyngbrigge co. Suthampton and Randolveston co. Dorset. Witnesses: Ralph Seyntleger, Thomas Tyrell knights, John de Gyldesburgh, Thomas de Belhous, John Stodaye. Dated Tuesday after St. John Baptist 1377. (source BHO)


1377 - Langley purchased by the Langley family so acquiring its name. "for before the going out of Edward the third,(1377) I find the Propriety invested by Sale in Langley, to which Family the Foundation of that House owes in part its Original, on which they ingraffed their own Name, which hath flourished under that Title ever since, though the Family be withered away and gone, the last of which Name at this place was Ralph Langley, who with Roger Twisden, Stephen Monins, Edward Monins, John Edingham or Engham, Richard Edingham, John Berton of Cotmanton in Shouldon, John Berham, John Betenham of Shurland in Pluckley, and others, Gentlemen of prime Rank in this County, were summoned to appear before Robert Poynings and John Perry, in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth,(1434) to disclaim the Title of the House of York, and this Ralph died in the year 1451,(source; Philipot)

1377 - King Richard II until deposed in 1399

1380 - Sundridge and Beckenham etc; Close Rolls;
Memorandum of acknowledgment, 8 February this year.William Spenser otherwise called Forneux citizen and fishmonger of London to Andrew Pykeman citizen and fishmonger and Joan his wife, who was wife of Robert Forneux citizen and fishmonger of London, their heirs and assigns. Quitclaim of the manor of Sundresshe and all other lands in Brumlegh, Beghenham, Chiselherst, Modyngham and elsewhere in Kent, with woods, rents etc., wards, marriages etc., which the grantor, John Litle late citizen and fishmonger of London, and Peter de Meldoun had by feoffment of the said Robert. Dated 1 February 4 Richard II.

1381 -
Peasants' Revolt, also called Wat Tyler's Rebellion, (1381), A result of the Poll Tax of 1377

1384 - Foxgrove; Plea Roll; Thomas Haithorp, George de Bursalle and Thomas le Walsh sued William Burcester(d.1407) and his wife Margaret (d.1/7/1393) for the Manor of Foxgrove. Margaret had been widow of Sir Bartholomew de Burghersh (4thLord Burghersh). The implication is that Margaret as widow of Bartholomew carried Foxgrove to the possession of William Burcester. But Haithorp, Bursalle and le Walsh were husbands of the daughters of Henry de Clyf(Cliffe) the nephew who inherited Foxgrove in 1332 on the death of his uncle also named Henry de Cliffe. https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=8JcbV309c5UC&lpg=RA2-PA507&dq=%22elizabeth%20de%20say%22%20thomas&pg=PA369#v=onepage&q=foxgrove&f=false

The family tree in the Plea Rolls shows how Henry de Cliffe d.1332 had a brother John who's son Henry had one son, Hugh, and three daughters. The son Hugh apparently died without issue and the three daughters' surviving husbands sued for shared ownership of Foxgrove. This is complicated as the manor appears to have been occupied by de Cliffe and Bartholomew Burghersh at the same time Margaret. This requires more clarification.
https://fmg.ac/resources/scanned-sources/category/78-tgb-13
I assume the plaintiffs won as in 1399 Hakkethorp(Haithorp) quitclaims Foxgrove to Elizabeth, wife of Edward le Despenser

1385 - Proof of age Maurice Bruyn. Horndon on the Hill by South Ockendon. 24 Sept.Maurice son and heir of Ingram Bruyn was born at South Ockendon and baptised in the church there on 14 September 1385, and was therefore aged 21 on 14 Sept. last [sic]. The jurors say that they remember this for the reasons given:
John Quynton, aged 45 years and more: Maurice was placed to nurse to the wife of John Jann, carpenter, at Aveley by South Ockendon, and John built him a house at Aveley in that year.
Thomas Turvylle, 54: on the second day after the baptism Maurice was put to nurse at Aveley, and he was sent to the same place by Alice wife of Robert Marny, knight, aunt of Maurice, to see how Maurice was kept and nursed, and he received a gold ring for his trouble.
William Ardale, 49, knows the date by a charter of feoffment of John Smyth by which he bought a croft in Stifford by South Ockendon from John Smyth in that year and had seisin.
John Arundell, 50, was sent on that day by Alice Marny, the aunt, to Robert Marny, then lord of South Ockendon, in London to tell him of the birth, and he was given 20s. for his trouble.
Robert Bolyngton, 50: on that day Alice Wykes(?) granted him 10 a. in Rainham by charter and he had seisin.
John Duddelee, 50, was a servant of Robert Braibrook, then bishop of London, who sent a white palfrey as a gift by him, and Alice Marny gave him 6s.8d. for his trouble.
Edward Caumbre, 60, saw Robert Burton, parson of South Ockendon, the godfather, give Maurice a silver goblet with a gilt cover on the day of the baptism.
Richard Byrle, 49, was at South Ockendon and saw John Broun, goldsmith of London, give Maurice a silver gilt …
John Salman, senior, 60, carried a torch from the manor to the church for the baptism and held it by the font.
William Love, 49, was retained as carpenter on that day by Ingram Bruyn to build a new chamber in the manor of South Ockendon and received 10s. from him.
John Payn, 50, when Maurice was at the church saw Henry Somer driving a cart with a pipe of red wine past the churchyard to the manor and rejoicing and delighting in the birth of Maurice… in such excitement Henry Somer neglected the cart … so that the wine was totally lost.
John Sculle, 48, … was then chief butler of Robert Marny, then lord of South Ockendon, and Robert Est, his clerk of accounts, gave him 10s. for his good services to the godfathers and godmother.

1385 - Penge/Kenthouse? the borders of Beckenham, Lewisham and Battersea meet in the general area of Penge and Kent House.

CP 25/1/289/54, number 131.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent. Surrey.
Place: Westminster.
Date: Two weeks from Holy Trinity, 8 Richard [II] [11 June 1385].
Parties: Henry Vannere, citizen of London', William More, citizen of London', and John Rote, citizen of London', querents, and William de Weston' and Joan, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 200 acres of land, 20 acres of meadow and 8 acres of wood in Begenham and Leuesham in the county of Kent and 12 acres of land in Batreseye in the county of Surrey.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William de Weston' and Joan have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Henry, as those which Henry, William More and John have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to Henry, William More and John and the heirs of Henry for ever.
For this: Henry, William More and John have given them 100 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Henry Vanner, William Moore, John Root, William de Weston, Joan de Weston
Places: London, Beckenham, Lewisham, Battersea


1387 - Beckenham Manor; 06/05/1387 Letter of attorney granted by Robert de Marny, knight, and Alice his wife, to John Coo and John Payne to deliver seisin of Robert de Bourton, parson of South Wekyndon (Ockendon), John Colyn, parson of Stifford, and John Martham, parson of Beckenham relating to the manor of Beckenham, Kent, and advowson of the church; the manor of Rovenore, Hants., and advowson of the church; the manor of Fordingbridge, Hants., with one toft and one carucate of land; the manor of Randolvestone, Dorset; one toft and one carucate of land in Brown Candover, Hants
[One seal] (Bromley HC)
Seisin is a transfer of land. in this case temporary as the property reverts to Ingram Bruyn at a later date.

1387 - Unidentified land in Beckenham and Bromley but Marny mentioned who was linked to Beckenham Manor. William Cressewyk of London, John Claveryng 'dyere' and Thomas Lincolne citizen and fishmonger of London to Andrew Pikeman citizen and fishmonger of London and Joan his wife and to their assigns during their lives and the life of the longest liver, with remainder to John Sibille citizen of London and his assigns during his life, remainder to Andrew his son and to the heirs of his body, remainder to Margaret daughter of John Sibille and to the heirs of her body, remainder to the right heirs of John Sibille. Indenture of demise of all the messuages, lands, rents and services with reversions, suits of court etc. in Bromlegh, Chiselhurst, Bekenham and Eltham co. Kent which the grantors had by feoffment of the said Andrew and Joan, as by a fine levied in the king's court at Westminster in 10 Richard II may appear, also of the land and wood called the Frythe in the parish of Chiselhurst which they had by feoffment of John Fyge citizen and fishmonger of London; and covenant that the said Andrew and Joan and the survivor and their assigns shall not be impeached for waste, nor John Sibille and his assigns, and that the executors of the said survivor shall have an easement in the premises for one year after the death of such survivor for removing and disposing of their corn, stock and moveable chattels thereupon. Witnesses: Sir Robert Marny knight, Geoffrey Newenton, Richard Tobynden, John Fyge, John Elys. Dated Bromlegh, 1 March 10 Richard II.
Memorandum of acknowledgment by the said William and John Claverynge, 19 March.


1388 - National Archive; Kent House or Manor of Kenthous: Date given for return to Chancery: 25/11/1388. M.2: Extent made at West Craye, Fri. 16/10/1388 before William Guildford, Sheriff of Kent. John Leeg had on the day of the recognisance in Beckenham [Bromley and Beckenham Hundred] the manor of Kenthous worth 20s. a year after expenses and 2 services. William Brantingham had nothing in Kent.

1389 - Court of Common Pleas.Plea of Covenant; Robert de Bourton, Robert de Marny and his wife Alice  are new names related to Beckenham Manor and Church but see 1387. (source:  http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/fines/abstracts/CP_25_1_289_55.shtml#187

The following indicates that Robert de Bourton acquires the right of Beckenham Manor and advowson from Robert de Marny and his wife.

CP 25/1/289/55, number 187.Image of document at AALT

County: Hampshire. Dorset. Kent. Place: Westminster.

Date: One week from Holy Trinity, 12 Richard [II] [20 June 1389]. And afterwards one week from St Michael, 13 Richard [II] [6 October 1389].

Parties: Robert de Bourton', the parson of the church of Southwekyn[Ockendon], [John] Colyn, the parson of the church of Stifford', and John Martham, the parson of the church of Bekenham, querents, and Robert de Marny, knight, and Alice, his wife, [deforciants].

Property: The manors of Forthyngbrigg' and Rouenore and 2 tofts and 2 carucates of land in Forthyngbrigg' and Brouncand[ouere and] the advowson of the church of Rouenore in the county of Southampton and the manor of Randolueston' in the county of Dorset and the manor of Bekenham and the advowson of the church of the same manor in the county of Kent.

Agreement; [Robert de Marny] and Alice have acknowledged the manors, tenements and advowsons to be the right of Robert de Bourton', as those which the same Robert, John and John have of their gift, to hold to Robert de Bourton', John and John and the heirs of Robert, of the chief lords for ever.

Warranty: Warranty by Robert de Marny and Alice for themselves and the heirs of Alice.

For this: Robert de Bourton', John and John have given them 500 marks of silver.



1393 - March 15th; John Martham, Parson of Beckenham may have been a knight and had significant influence in Beckenham and beyond at this time with the Bruyns and de Marnys.
John Martham parson of Bekenham to Robert de Marny knight and his assigns during his life, with remainder to Ingram Brun knight and the heirs male of his body, remainder to William de Marny son and heir of Robert and to the heirs male of his body, remainder to Maurice Brun knight, his heirs and assigns. Indenture tripartite of gift with warranty of the manor and advowson of Bekenham co. Kent, the manor of Forthyngbrigge co. Southampton, a toft and one carucate of land in Forthyngbrigge called 'Godeshulle,' and the manor of Randolveston co. Dorset, which by charter enrolled in chancery the said Ingram gave to the said Robert and Alice his wife, mother of the said Ingram, and to the heirs and assigns of the said Alice, and by fine levied in the king's court the said Robert and Alice gave to Robert de Bourton parson of South Wokyndoun, John Colyn parson of Styfford co. Essex and John Martham and to the heirs of Robert de Bourton, Robert de Bourton having made a quitclaim thereof to John Colyn and John Martham, their heirs and assigns, and John Colyn being dead; and covenant that Robert de Marny and his assigns may during his life without impeachment make waste in all houses, woods etc. to the premises pertaining. Dated 2 March 16 Richard II.
Memorandum
 of acknowledgment by the parties in chancery at Westminster, 2 March.

John Martham (as above) to William Aylmar and John Payn. Letter of attorney, appointing them to give Robert de Marny knight seisin of the manor and advowson of Bekenham, the manor of Forthyngbrigge, a toft and land there called Godeshulle, and the manor of Randolveston. Dated (as the last).
Memorandum
 of acknowledgment by John Martham (as above).
(source: BHO)

Also; John Martham parson of Bekenham co. Kent and lord of Randolveston co. Dorset to Amice sometime wife of William Hore. Charter with warranty of a yearly rent to be taken during her life of all his lands etc. in Randolveston; and in name of seisin he has paid her 6d. in part payment of the first term. Witnesses: Robert de Marny, Ingram Brun knights, William de Marny, Thomas de Merston, Walter Colman. Dated 6 November 16 Richard II.
Memorandum
 of acknowledgment (as before), 2 March.
Indenture made between John Martham parson of Bekenham and lord of the manor of Bekenham and Robert Cuttulfe of Bilchangre called Volere, witnessing a grant with warranty for life to the said Robert, for good service now and hereafter done to Sir Robert de Marny and Dame Alice his wife, as a yeoman of his estate ought to render to his master, of all easements of the houses in the lodge called the 'Parkgate' of Bekenham, pasture for two kine and four pigs going freely throughout the park, a bushel of good wheat every week, and 30s. a year to be taken of the said manor for raiment and for his salary, of all which seisin has been given him. Witnesses: Ingram Brun knight, William de Marny, John Body, Thomas de Merston, Walter Colman. Dated 4 February 16 Richard II. French. Memorandum of acknowledgment by the parties (as above), 2 March.


1399 - King Henry IV  until 1413

1399 - Thomas Hakkethorp of Yorkshire to Elizabeth who was wife of Edward le Despenser. Quitclaim of the manor of Foxgrove, and of all lands, rents, services, commons etc. in Bekenham and elsewhere in Kent, Surrey and Sussex. Dated 25 May 1 Henry IV.

1399 -

CP 25/1/111/254, number 7.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: Two weeks from St Martin, 1 Henry [IV] [25 November 1399]. And afterwards one week from St Hilary in the same year [20 January 1400].
Parties: John N[orbu?]ry, esquire, and Pernel, his wife, querents, and Ralph de Neuyll', knight, earl of Westmorland, deforciant.
Property: 7 messuages, 280 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow, 40 acres of wood and 28 shillings of rent in Estgrenewich', Leuesham, Kettebroke, Eltham, Chesilhirst', Charleton', Bokenham and le Lee, which Hugh de Middelton' holds for life.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: The earl has acknowledged the tenements to be the right of John, and has granted for himself and his heirs that the tenements - which Hugh held for life of the inheritance of the earl in the aforesaid vills on the day the agreement was made, and which after the decease of Hugh ought to revert to the earl and his heirs - after the decease of Hugh shall remain to John and Pernel and the heirs of John, to hold of the chief lords for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: John and Pernel have given him 200 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: John Norbury, Pernel Norbury, Ralph de Neville, earl of Westmorland, Hugh de Middleton
Places: East Greenwich, Lewisham, Kidbrooke, Eltham, Chislehurst, Charlton, Beckenham, Lee

1400 - Post Mortem Inquisition at Deptford. 10 Sept. Ingram Bruyn, Knight. at the time of his death, as well as several other properties in other counties He held the manor of Beckenham with the advowson to himself and the heirs male of his body, and failing them to William Marny, knight, and his heirs male. It is held of the king in chief by knight service, annual value 10 marks.

Date of death  12th August, and heir was his son Maurice Bruin aged over 14.

(This section implies that John Martham, parson of Beckenham has some rights over Rowner manor and advowson in Hampshire) Rowner, the manor and the advowson, jointly with Elizabeth his (Ingram Bruyn's)wife, who still lives, by the grant of John Martham, parson of Beckenham in Kent, by his indenture dated 24 Feb. 1393, with remainder, in default of heirs male of Ingram to William Marny, son and heir of Robert de Marny, knight, and his heirs male. They are held of the king by a rent of 40s., annual value of the manor £10 and of the advowson when it occurs 10 marks.
Date of death and heir as above.

1400 - Foxgrove: Thomas Hakkethorp of Yorkshire to Elizabeth who was wife of Edward le Despenser. Quitclaim of the manor of Foxgrove, and of all lands, rents, services, commons etc. in Bekenham and elsewhere in Kent, Surrey and Sussex. Dated 25 May 1 Henry IV. (BHO). A quitclaim relinquishes interest in a property.

1403 - Memorandum of Acknowledgement; Beckenham but property unidentified: Stephen Brunne citizen and grocer of London, son and heir of Richard Brunne and of Cicely his wife daughter and heir of Reynold son and heir of John Julian, to Nicholas Carreu the elder esquire of Surrey, his heirs and assigns. Quitclaim with warranty of all lands, rents and services in Croydoun, Sanderstede, Micham, Begenham, Wodemersthorn, Bedyngton, Cressalton, Brystow, Hourne, Lyngefelde, Cullisdoun, Farley, Adyngton and elsewhere in Surrey sometime of the said John Julyan. Dated 6 December 5 Henry IV. (BHO)

This Richard Brunne may be a younger son of Sir William Bruyn and his brother would have been Sir Ingram Bruyn so Stephen would be the grandson of Sir William Bruyn. As the main Manor land remained intact these properties remain unidentified or it might be that as Sir Ingram Bruyn was the primary landowner he had leased it to Stephen who assigned the lease to Carreu (Carew). Carreu is a line of research. Nicholas Carew, Lord Privvy Seal (d.1390) for Henry IV can be found on Wikipedia and his heir also named Nicholas is probably the one in question here. The Carrews held sway over large areas of Kent/Surrey so would have had several tenants and sub-tenants. The mention of Farley and Adyngton (Farleigh and Addington) will arise later when John Cator buys land which passed through the Leigh family and Trecothicks. The Carreus also held Battersea which would come into the ownership of the St.Johns as would Beckenham Manor in the mid 17th century.

See the entry under 1422 when Carreu assigns his property including Bekyngham to others.


1405 - Death of Elizabeth Bruyn widow of Ingram Bruyn, see 1407


1407 - INGRAM BRUYN, KNIGHT Writ, plura, 14 Sept. 1407. Inquisition. Brentwood. 22 Sept. He held the manor of South Ockendon with the advowson in fee tail to himself and his heirs male, with successive remainders in default of such heirs to William Marny, knight, and his heirs male, and Maurice Bruyn, knight, and his heirs male. It is held of the countess of Hereford by knight service, annual value £40. The countess is holding it until the full age of the heir in virtue of royal letters patent [CFR 1399–1405, p.74].
He also held 2 a. in Stifford with the advowson, which were not mentioned in the former inquisition [CIPM XVIII, no.93]. Of whom and by what service they are held, and the annual value are unknown. William Marny, knight, has occupied them and taken the profits, title unknown.
He died on 12 Aug. 1400. Maurice Bruyn, esquire, his son and next heir, was aged 21 years and more on 14 Sept. last. C 137/59, no.52
see 1400 for the inquisition relating to Beckenham Manor descending to Maurice Bruyn at the age of 14.

Writ 20 Sept. 1407. Post Mortem Inquisition. Deptford. 21 Sept. ELIZABETH WIDOW OF INGRAM BRUYN, KNIGHT
She held in dower of the king in chief by knight service after the death of Ingram her husband (d.1400) a third part of the manor of Beckenham of the inheritance of Maurice Bruyn, his son and heir, annual value 40s.
She died on 14 Dec. 1405. Maurice was aged 21 years on 14 Sept. last. William Marny, knight, has held and taken the profits since her death, title unknown. (BHO)
William de Marny was a step-brother-inlaw of Elizabeth Bruyn. Her maiden name was de la Pole.
She also held for life the manor of Rowner with the advowson by the grant of John Marsham, parson of Beckenham, to Ingram Bruyn, Elizabeth herself and his heirs male, with remainder to Maurice Bruyn. It is held of the king by a rent of 40s., annual value £10, and the advowson when it occurs 10 marks.
This last sentence provides the name of the parson of Beckenham at this time.

It would appear that Maurice Bruyn was a minor until 1407 and  William de Marny, his father's half brother, was acting as guardian from 1400 to this date.

BHO and https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=G0OpPhdsTrgC&lpg=RA2-PA59&ots=fSM-3h-s1C&dq=Robert%20de%20marny&pg=RA2-PA59#v=onepage&q=Robert%20de%20marny&f=false

1413 - King Henry V until 1422

1422 - Memorandum of acknowledgment in chancery at Westminster, 13 February.Nicholas Carreu of Bedyngton co. Surrey esquire to Roger Heroun, John Brymmesgrove clerks, John Martyn, John Cornwaleys, Thomas Hayton, John Gaynesforde and Thomas Herynge, their heirs and assigns. Charter with warranty of the manors of Maythamme and Malmaynes co. Kent with the advowson of the chantry of Malmaynes, and all other his lands, rents, services, heriots, reliefs, suits of court, ways, paths, rights etc. in the towns or parishes of Rolvynden, Smalehythe, Newynden, Losynham, 'Stoke in le Hoo,' Alhalwyn, Ryersshe, Byrelynge, Mallynge, Offham and Bekynham. Witnesses: Edward Guldeforde, Thomas Anger, John Bytlysden, John Sprake, John Peny, John Halle, Thomas Norice. Dated Stoke, Sunday before Allhallows 9 Henry V. (BHO)

1422 - King Henry VI until 1461 deposed in Wars of the Roses

1437 - Court of Common Pleas records. It is tempting to believe this may relate to what became Woolsey's Farm at Clay Hill. (subject to proof)
CP 25/1/115/311, number 439.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One week from Holy Trinity, 15 Henry VI [2 June 1437].
Parties: William Wolcy, querent, and John Langwyth' and Ellen, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 40 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow, 20 acres of wood and 11 pence of rent in Bekynham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: John and Ellen have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of William, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Ellen to him and his heirs for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: William has given them 40 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: William Wolsey, John Langwith, Ellen Langwith
Places: Beckenham


1437 -

CP 25/1/115/312, number 461.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One week from the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 15 Henry VI [9 February 1437]. And afterwards two weeks from Easter, 16 Henry VI [27 April 1438].
Parties: William Twyford', querent, and John Longe of Bekenham and Lucy, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 18 acres of land, 3 acres of wood and a moiety of 1 acre of meadow in Westram.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: John and Lucy have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of William, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Lucy to him and his heirs for ever.
For this: William has given them 20 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: William Twyford, John Long, Lucy Long
Places: Beckenham, Westerham

1439 - Court of Common Pleas, property to be identified.

CP 25/1/115/313, number 479.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: Two weeks from St Hilary, 17 Henry VI [27 January 1439].
Parties: John Langwyth', Thomas Peny and Otes (Oto) Trethek', querents, and William Waleys of London', skinner, and Katherine, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 1 toft, 40 acres of land, 1 acre of meadow, 100 acres of wood and 20 shillings of rent in Bekenham, Hese, Bromley, Leuesham and Wykham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William and Katherine have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of John, as those which John, Thomas and Otes have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Katherine to John, Thomas and Otes and the heirs of John for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: John, Thomas and Otes have given them 100 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: John Langwith, Thomas Penny, Otes Trethick, William Wales, Katherine Wales
Places: London, Beckenham, Hayes, Bromley, Lewisham, East Wickham (or West Wickham)


1439 - Memorandums of acknowledgment. (Quitclaim and Charter of Demise) Lands acquired by Nicholas Carreu first mentioned in 1403 and 1422. As the lands encompassed Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham, Chiselhursh and Hayes either Foxgrove or Langley may be included. But this is quesswork at present.

Thomas Panter, Stephen Proctour clerk, George Boys, John Rose and Robert Blundell to John Stanlow, Margaret his wife, John Brokley citizen and alderman of London, Thomas de Haydoke, John de Wode citizen and mercer of London, Thomas Quyne and John Deleawe, and to the heirs and assigns of the said John Stanlow and Margaret. Charter of demise of all the lands, rents and services, woods etc. in Bromlegh, Bekenham, Leuesham, Cheselhurst and Hese which the grantors had by demise and feoffment of Mercy who was wife of Nicholas Carreu, Thomas Lewkenore knight, William Selman, Henry Severe clerk, Thomas Heryng and John Bourneforde, and of a parcel of land at Sparowe in the parish of Orpyngton containing 16 acres called 'Sharpeslonde' with the wood growing thereupon. Witnesses: Reynold Cobham, Thomas Keriell knights, Richard Wodevile esquire, William Garnet, Robert Mirfyn, Nicholas Sibyle, John Fereby, Roger Appulton, Thomas Couper. Dated Bromlegh, 4 May 17 Henry VI. (BHO)

Thomas Panter, Stephen Proctour clerk, George Boys, John Rose and Robert Blundell to John Stanlow and Margaret his wife, John Brokley citizen and alderman of London, Thomas de Haydok, John de Wode citizen and mercer of London, Thomas Quyne and John Deleawe, and to the heirs and assigns of the said John Stanlow and Margaret. Quitclaim of all the lands, rents and services, woods etc. in Bromley, Bekenham, Leuesham, Cheselhurst and Hese which Thomas Panter and the others had by feoffment of Mercy who was wife of Nicholas Carreu, Thomas Lewkenore knight, William Selman, Henry Severe clerk, Thomas Heryng and John Bourneford, and of a parcel of land at Sparowe in the parish of Orpyngton called 'Sharpeslonde' containing 16 acres, with the wood growing thereupon. Witnesses: Reynold Cobham, Thomas Keriell knights, Richard Wodevyle esquire, William Garnet, Robert Mirfyn, Nicholas Sibyle, John Fereby, Roger Appulton, Thomas Couper. Dated 7 May 17 Henry VI.

Thomas Leukenore knight to John Stanlowe, Margaret his wife, John Brokley citizen and alderman of London, Thomas de Haydoke, John de Wode citizen and mercer of London, Thomas Quyne and John Deleawe and to the heirs and assigns of John Stanlowe and Margaret. Quitclaim of all the lands, rents and services, woods etc. in Bromlegh, Bekenham, Leuesham, Cheselhurst and Hese which Mercy who was wife of Nicholas Carreu, William Selman, Henry Severe clerk, Thomas Heryng, John Bourneford and Thomas Leukenore, with John Hale and John Perueys both now deceased, had by demise and feoffment of John Fray, Henry Frowyk, Robert Otteley, Miles Skulle, John Abbot, Thomas Catworth, Everard Flete, John Grace, John atte Legh and Richard Billyngburgh, and of a parcel of land at Sparowe in the parish of Orpyngton called 'Sharpeslond' containing 16 acres with the wood growing thereupon. Witnesses: Reynold Cobham, Thomas Keriell knights, Richard Wodevile esquire, William Garnet, Robert Mirfyn, Nicholas Sybyle, John Fereby, Roger Appulton, Thomas Couper. Dated 3 June 17 Henry VI.

Mercy late the wife of Nicholas Carreu widow, Thomas Lewkenore knight, Henry Severe clerk, William Selman, Thomas Heryng and John Bornefforde to Thomas Pantere, Stephen Proctour clerk, George Boys, John Rose and Robert Bloundell of Bromlegh co. Kent, their heirs and assigns. Quitclaim of all the lands, rents, services, woods etc. in Bromley, Bekynham, Leuesham, Chisilhurst, Hese and Orpyngton co. Kent, which they had by charter of feoffment of the said Mercy and the others. Dated 15 October 17 Henry VI.

source; BHO

This last one assigning the land to Thomas Pantere etc.

1449 -

CP 25/1/116/322, number 713.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: The day after the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 27 Henry VI [3 February 1449].
Parties: Philip Alisaunder, querent, and Peter Napper and Joan, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 2 acres of land and 1 acre of meadow in Bekenham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Peter and Joan have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Philip, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to him and his heirs for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: Philip has given them 20 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Philip Alexander, Peter Napper, Joan Napper
Places: Beckenham

1450 - A roll containing pardons for the followers of Jack Cade includes 22 men  from the Parish of Beckenham, including Robert Langley, Richard Langley and Robert Pain, the latter being the constable of Beckenham. This Richard Langley  or Langle was probably the son of Ralph Langle of Beckenham who bequeathed by his will of 1453 proved at Rochester 3s and 4d to the new bells of Beckenham church. (source Robert Borrowman)

1451 - Ralph Langley of Langley died in the year 1451, and ordered Langley and other demeasns at Bekenham to be sold for the discharging his Debts, the purport and Effects of which Will were accordingly performed, and his Estate at Bekenham and Langley, passed away by Sale to John Violett, whose Successors enjoyed it until the Be∣ginning of Henry. the eighth,(1509) and then it was conveyed to John Stiles Esq; who much inlarged the House with a supply of Buildings, and from him is it by Descent devolved to be the instant Possession of his Successor Sir Humphrey Stiles Knight and Baronet.(d1552)

Philipot had stated about Langley: "the name and place: before the going out of Edward the third,(1377) I find the Propriety invested by Sale in Langley, to which Family the Foundation of that House owes in part its Original, on which they ingraffed their own Name, which hath flourished under that Title ever since, though the Family be withered away and gone, the last of which Name at this place was Ralph Langley, who with Roger Twisden, Stephen Monins, Edward Monins, John Edingham or Engham, Richard Edingham, John Berton of Cotmanton in Shouldon, John Berham, John Betenham of Shurland in Pluckley, and others, Gentlemen of prime Rank in this County, were summoned to appear before Robert Poynings and John Perry, in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth,(1434) to disclaim the Title of the House of York, and this Ralph died in the year 1451, and ordered Langley and other demeasns at Bekenham to be sold for the discharging his Debts, the purport and Effects of which Will were accordingly performed, and his Estate at Bekenham and Langley, passed away by Sale to John Violett,"

The family name of Langley appears in the 1434 Lay Subsidy Roll which is before the 1377 date which Philipot states and whether the family had not acquired the "Langley" estate until 1377 remains a question.

1453 -

CP 25/1/293/72, number 376.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Surrey. Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: Two weeks from Easter, 31 Henry VI [15 April 1453].
Parties: Richard Neder, querent, and William Humfrey and Joan, his wife, deforciants.
Property: A moiety of 4 acres of land in Croydon' in the county of Surrey and a moiety of 2 messuages, of 32 acres of land, of 6 acres of meadow and of 8 acres of wood in Bekenham in the county of Kent.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William and Joan have acknowledged the moieties to be the right of Richard, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to him and his heirs for ever.
For this: Richard has given them 20 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Richard Needer, William Humphrey, Joan Humphrey
Places: Croydon, Beckenham


CP 25/1/293/72, number 376.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Surrey. Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: Two weeks from Easter, 31 Henry VI [15 April 1453].
Parties: Richard Neder, querent, and William Humfrey and Joan, his wife, deforciants.
Property: A moiety of 4 acres of land in Croydon' in the county of Surrey and a moiety of 2 messuages, of 32 acres of land, of 6 acres of meadow and of 8 acres of wood in Bekenham in the county of Kent.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William and Joan have acknowledged the moieties to be the right of Richard, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to him and his heirs for ever.
For this: Richard has given them 20 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Richard Needer, William Humphrey, Joan Humphrey
Places: Croydon, Beckenham
 
CP 25/1/293/72, number 377.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent. Surrey.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One month from Easter, 31 Henry VI [29 April 1453].
Parties: Robert Payn' of Bekenham and Isolt, his wife, and John Chapman, querents, and Philip Rough'hede and Agnes, his wife, deforciants.
Property: A moiety of 2 messuages, of 32 acres of land, of 6 acres of meadow and of 8 acres of wood in Bekenham in the county of Kent and a moiety of 4 acres of land in Croydon' in the county of Surrey.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Philip and Agnes have acknowledged the moieties to be the right of John, as those which John, Robert and Isolt have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Agnes to Robert and Isolt and John and the heirs of John for ever.
For this: Robert and Isolt and John have given them 10 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Robert Payne, Isolt Payne, John Chapman, Philip Roughead, Agnes Roughead
Places: Beckenham, Croydon

CP 25/1/293/72, number 381.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Surrey. Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One week from St Michael, 32 Henry VI [6 October 1453].
Parties: Simon Terry, querent, and Nicholas Mason' and Ellen, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 10 acres of land in Bokenham in the county of Surrey and 1 messuage and 10 acres of land in Batersey in the county of Kent.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Nicholas and Ellen have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Simon, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Ellen to him and his heirs for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: Simon has given them 20 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Simon Terry, Nicholas Mason, Ellen Mason
Places: Beckenham (in Kent), Battersea (in Surrey)

1455 / 1487 The Wars of the Roses, main period although some conflict outside of this period

1456 - Katherine heir of Richard Shotte conveyed lands in Beckenham, Wickham & Hayes to John Hever[1]. Later in    1472[2] 1485[3]1495[4]Memorandum of acknowledgment, 4 February.


1457/8 - Probate of will of William Plegge, of Beckenham with bequest of 20 shillings to his daughter, Elinor when she becomes of marriageable age. Will: 16 November 1457, codicil: 20 November 1457, probate:18 March 1458.In the event of her death before this time the money to remain with his sons John and William. Bequests of land to his sons and his brother John Plegge (field names; Tomsowtravis, Sunteriscrofte, Nether Somerfeld, Thoambrooke, Suthereden, Jennycokkescrofte) The will is in the vernacular the codicil in Latin, by which he appoints his wife Agnes and brother John, executors (BHC) (adjoining Crouch Oak)

1461 - King Edward IV until 1483 (see March, Battle of Towton)

1461 Beckenham Manor described by Philipot and Hasted: Death of Sir Henry Bruin of South Ockenden and Beckenham Manor, his two Daughters and Coheirs about the Beginning of Edward the fourth,(1461) divided his Inheritance, each of them having a first and second Husband:(Philipot). Hasted lists three husbands each as do some modern chroniclers.

Alice the eldest was first married to Robert Harleston of Essex Esquire, and after to Sir Thomas Heveningham; and Hasted adds William Berners.

Elizabeth second Daughter was wedded first to Thomas Tirrell of Heron in Essex Esquire, and after his Decease to Sir William Brandon Knight, who was Standard-bearer to Henry the seventh at Bosworth Field, (1485) where he was stain in asserting his Cause and Quarrel against Richard the third, and he had Issue by her Sir Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, the Flower and perfection of English Chivalrie in his Time, who sometimes kept his Residence at this place, (not as Proprietarie, but onely as Lessee, for the Sole Inheritance upon the Division of Bruin's Estate accrued to Tirrell;). Hasted lists William Mallory, Brandon then Tirrell (of Herne) but later chroniclers have Tirrell, Brandon and Mallory. Tirrell has also been spelt Tyrrel and the History of Essex by Thomas Wright is a source of their lineage.

1461 - Beckenham Manor, death of Henry Bruyn: Transcription of a A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 15 Feb.,1 Edw. IV. : from a 1486 Inspeximus seemingly at the widowhood of Elizabeth Brandon nee Bruyn.
Inspeximus and exemplification, at the instance of Elizabeth Brandon, widow, of the following documents:—(l.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 15 Feb.,1 Edw. IV (1461). (Inq. 1 Edw. IV. No. 27), directed to John Grene, escheator of Kent, upon the death of Henry Bruyn, Knt. (2.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromley, co. Kent, on Saturday, 20 Feb, 1 Edw. IV.,before John Grene, the escheator, by the oaths of Richard Nether, Thomas Dawe, John Mydday, Wlliam Myddey, John Plegge, John Yorke, Henry Lapworth,Thomas Bedyll, Henry Violet, Robert Blundell, Simon Kechill, and Robert Thorp, setting forth that Henry Bruyn, knt., was seized of the manor of Beckenham, alias Beghenham (fully described), with the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one knights fee; and that he died 30 Nov.last; and that Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Tyrell, esq.,aged 17 years, and Alice, wife of John Berners, aged 19 years, are his daughters and heirs. (3.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 18 March, 13 Edw. IV.(1474) (Inq. 13 Edw. IV. No. 59), directed to John Brode,escheator of Kent, upon the death of Alice, wife of John Hevenyngham, knt. (4.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromlegh, co. Kent, 11 Nov, 13 Edw. IV., before John Brode, the elder, the escheator, by the oaths of John Kyere, Thomas Kyng, Simon Keehill, Henry Violet, Alexander Curteys, Stephen Kete, John Plegge, Robert Humfrey, Philip Alexander, Robert Pope, John Dare Taillour, William Bradfote, and Richard Kyng, setting forth that Alice Hevenyngham was seized of the moiety of the manor of Beghenham, and the moiety of the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one fourth part of a knights fee, and married successively John Berners, esq. (by whom she had issue John Berners), Robert Harleston esq. (by whom she had likewise issue), and John Hevenyngham,knt. (by whom she had issue George Hevenyngham),and that she died 15 Feb., 12 Edw. IV.;(1473) and that the said John Hevenyngham now holds the premises; and that the before-mentioned John Berners is her son and next heir, and is of the age of 10 years. Pat. p. 3. m. 5 (23).

The sections above related to Alice and Elizabeth, their marriages, deaths and heirs should be in later timeline milestones but here they help to understand the descent of Beckenham Manor from the Bruyns to the Tyrells via Elizabeth and to Heveningham via Alice.

1461 - 29th March; Battle of Towton, Wars of the Roses; A victory for the Yorkists. Edward IV displaced Henry VI

Some time before 4 November 1474/1475 Brandon married Elizabeth Bruyn, daughter and co-heiress of Sir Henry Bruyn of South OckendonEssex, and his wife Elizabeth Darcy. Himself the son of Sir Maurice Bruyn. She was the widow of Thomas Tyrrell of Heron, Essex, whom she had married before 17 February 1461/1462, and who died after 3 July 1471, c. 13 October 1473, of the City of London, of Beckenham, Kent and of South OckendonEssex. She was a granddaughter of Sir Maurice Bruyn (d. 1466), and daughter and co-heiress of Sir Henry Bruyn (d. 1461) by Elizabeth Darcy (died c. 1471), daughter of Sir Robert Darcy of Maldon, Essex. On her father's side Elizabeth Bruyn was descended from Sir William le Brune, Knight Chamberlain to King Edward I. After William Brandon's death at the Battle of Bosworth on 22 August 1485, she married William Mallory or Mallery, Esq., whom she survived. She died 7 or 26 March 1493/1494.


This legend from the 1623 Beckenham Manor Map, copied in 1768, shows the almost identical acreages of the two halves of Beckenham Manor (467 against 469 acres) and the part which is later leased separately, see 1623

1466 - Court of Common Pleas, property to be identified.

CP 25/1/294/74, number 33.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent. Surrey.
Place: Westminster.
Date: The day after the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 5 Edward IV [3 February 1466].
Parties: Thomas Wareham and William Nele, clerk, querents, and John Massam and Margery, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage and 12 acres of land in Bekenham in the county of Kent and 2 messuages, 24 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow and 3 acres of wood in Peynge in the parish of Batersey in the county of Surrey.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: John and Margery have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Thomas, as those which Thomas and William have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Margery to Thomas and William and the heirs of Thomas for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: Thomas and William have given them 60 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Thomas Wareham, William Neal, John Massam, Margery Massam
Places: Beckenham, Penge (in Battersea)

1466 - Pickhurst Green mentioned in this inquisition; Katherine Shotte, daughter and heir of Richard Shotte, to John Hever, John Kechell and Richard Alyn, their heirs and assigns. Quitclaim with warranty of a messuage with curtilage and garden in the parish of Hese (Hayes) co. Kent between land of Simon Kechell on the north and west, land of the heirs of Thomas Frensshe on the south and a common pasture called 'Pykherst grene' on the east, of four fields called 'Menefeld, Mapull croft, Frithfeld and Litill Frithfeld,' and a grove of wood called 'Menefeldes grove' lying together there between land of Richard Shotte of Hese and the heirs of John Lambe on the north, of Simon Kechell on the south, William Frensshe and John Chapman of Bekenham on the east, and a wood called 'Wykham Frith' on the west, and of a croft called 'Solefelde' there between land of John Broun on the north, 'Solelane' on the south and east, and land of John Hever on the west. Dated 4 February, 5 Edward IV. (source: BHO) One of many connections with surrounding areas such as Hayes and West Wickham. Lysons mentions the supposed manors of Pickhurst or Heaver(Hever) in Hayes.

1469 - Court of Common Pleas, to be identified, John Atte Lygh possibly of the Leighs of Addington adjacent to West Wickham

CP 25/1/117/334, number 110.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One week from St John the Baptist, 9 Edward IV [1 July 1469].
Parties: Ambrose Cresacre, Roger Copley and John Atte Lygh', querents, and James Crovmere, esquire, and Katherine, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 140 acres of wood in Westwykham and Bekynham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: James and Katherine have acknowledged the wood to be the right of Ambrose, as that which Ambrose, Roger and John have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed it from themselves and the heirs of Katherine to Ambrose, Roger and John and the heirs of Ambrose for ever.
Warranty: Warranty against George, abbot of Westminster, and his successors.
For this: Ambrose, Roger and John have given them 100 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Ambrose Cresacre, Roger Copley, John Atte Leigh, James Cromer, Katherine Cromer
Places: West Wickham, Beckenham

1469 - The Forsters were of Southend, Lewisham  until the 20th Century,  it is tempting to believe this may be related to Southend. (Court of Common Pleas)

CP 25/1/117/334, number 109.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One week from Holy Trinity, 9 Edward IV [4 June 1469].
Parties: John Forster and Philip Agmondesham, querents, and Richard Forster and Isabel, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 4 messuages, 3 carucates of land, 30 acres of meadow, 300 acres of wood and 40 shillings of rent and a rent of 2 ounces of pepper, 2 hens and 3 chickens in Leuesham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Richard and Isabel have acknowledged the tenements and rents to be the right of John, as those which John and Philip have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Isabel to John and Philip and the heirs of John for ever.
Warranty: Warranty against Walter, abbot of the monastery of St Augustine, Bristol, and his successors.
For this: John and Philip have given them 200 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: John Forster, Philip Amersham, Richard Forster, Isabel Forster
Places: Lewisham

1469 - Lease and counterpart from Thomas Tyrell, of Beckenham, Kent, and Elizabeth, his wife, one of the daughters and heirs of Henry Bruyn, knight to Robert Harleston, of Suffolk of half the manor of Beckenham, Kent [One seal on each] (Bromley Collections)


1484 - catalogue item1472 - Harleian Manuscripts, British Museum. Licence for Sir John Hynyngham to enter the Manor of Bekyngham

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=PaRJAAAAcAAJ&lpg=PA283&dq=hynyngham%20bekyngham&pg=PA283#v=onepage&q=hynyngham%20bekyngham&f=false


1473 - see 1466, this is related to John Hever. C. 5019. Grant by John Hever of Hese, Simon Shotte of Bromelegh, the elder, and William Cowper of Downe to Isabel Smyzthe late the wife of John Smyzthe of Downe of all those lands and tenements with all their appurtenances (sic) except a croft of land called 'Belysland' with six other parcels of land lying dispersed in a place called 'le Hilde,' and also another parcel of wood called 'Poke Grove'; to hold to her for life, with remainder to them, their heirs and assigns, for sale, the money therefrom to be disposed according to the intent of the last will of the said John Smyzthe. Downe, 14 June, 12 Edward IV. Fragments of seals.

1473 - Death of Alice Bruyn (married to 3rd husband John Heveningham.)

1474 (see also 1461) - Beckenham Manor relevant to division between Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn and their heirs. A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 18 March, 13 Edw. IV.(1474) (Inq. 13 Edw. IV. No. 59), directed to John Brode,escheator of Kent, upon the death of Alice, wife of John Hevenyngham, knt. (4.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromlegh, co. Kent, 11 Nov, 13 Edw. IV., before John Brode, the elder, the escheator, by the oaths of John Kyere, Thomas Kyng, Simon Keehill, Henry Violet, Alexander Curteys, Stephen Kete, John Plegge, Robert Humfrey, Philip Alexander, Robert Pope, John Dare Taillour, William Bradfote, and Richard Kyng, setting forth that Alice Hevenyngham was seized of the moiety of the manor of Beghenham, and the moiety of the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one fourth part of a knights fee, and married successively John Berners, esq. (by whom she had issue John Berners), Robert Harleston esq. (by whom she had likewise issue), and John Hevenyngham,knt. (by whom she had issue George Hevenyngham),and that she died 15 Feb., 12 Edw. IV.;(1473) and that the said John Hevenyngham now holds the premises; and that the before-mentioned John Berners is her son and next heir, and is of the age of 10 years. Pat. p. 3. m. 5 (23).

1478 - Post Mortem Inquisition: Walter Fitz dies possessed of parts of Foxgrove Manor and Beckenham Manor , but seemingly under some 'lease at will' arrangement for rent from Terell and Grene? Writ 29 November, inquisition 2 February, 21 Henry VII. (source: BHO)

Roger Fitz was seised in fee of the under-mentioned lands &c. in Leuesham and Bekenham, and by his charter indented dated at Leuesham, 20 March, 19 Henry VII, gave them to Peter Bevyll, Roger Holand, William Honychurch, Thomas Ifley, George Harvy, Robert Morley and William Morley, who survive, and the said Walter Fitz, since deceased, and their heirs, to the use of Isabel, his wife, now wife of William Atclyff, for life, and after her death to the use of himself and his heirs. Afterwards, to wit, on 28 March, 19 Henry VII, the said Roger by his last will willed that after the death of Isabel the said Peter Bevyll and the others should stand enfeoffed of the said lands &c. to the use of the said Walter, his brother, and the heirs male of his body, and in default of such heirs male to the use of himself, the said Roger and his heirs.
Walter died 3 June last, seised of the other under-mentioned lands &c. in fee tail, to wit, to himself and the heirs of his body. John Fitz, aged 9 years and more, is his son and sole next heir.

Manor of Rydley, and 100a. land, 20a. wood and 40s. rent in Rydley and Asshe, worth 5l., held of the abbot of the monastery of St. Mary of Graces beside the Tower of London, in right of his church, by service of half a knight’s fee and 33s. 4d. rent yearly.
A messuage and 100a. land in Perystrete in the parish of Northflete, worth 100s., and a messuage, 11a. land and 2a. moor in Bowrestrete in the same parish, worth 14s., held in ‘gavelkend’ of the archbishop of Canterbury by fealty and 33s. 4d. rent.
A messuage, 40a. land, 6a. meadow and 6a. wood in Estgrenewiche, worth 40s., held of the prior of the house of Jesus of Shene, co. Surrey, by fealty and other services or rents unknown.
12 messuages, 200a. pasture, 300a. meadow and 400a. wood in Leuesham and Bekenham, worth 40 marks, held as to the messuages &c. in Leuesham of the said prior of Shene and Thomas, marquess of Dorset, by fealty and 8s. rent, and as to the messuages &c. in Bekenham of William Terell, as of his manor of Bekenham, and Thomas Grene, knight, as of his manor of Foxgroves in Bekenham, by 7s. rent.


1479circa – William Brograve of Kelseys in possession of lands around Kelsey in Beckenham.

1481 - Court of Common Pleas, land and people to be identified but on the Bromley/Beckenham border

CP 25/1/117/340, number 266.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One month from Easter, 21 Edward IV [20 May 1481].
Parties: Robert Shotte, querent, and Thomas Whyte and Agnes, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 28 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow and 8 acres of wood in Bromlegh' and Bekenham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Thomas and Agnes have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Robert, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Agnes to him and his heirs for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: Robert has given them 20 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Robert Shott, Thomas White, Agnes White
Places: Bromley, Beckenham

1483 - King Richard III until 1485

Richard had seized the throne and is suspected of murdering the Princes in the Tower.  The feeling that he was not entitled to the crown led to conflict between him and the supporters of Henry Tudor. This turmoil affected local affairs as the owners of estates either fell foul or gained favour with Richard and subsequently Henry VII after the Battle of Bosworth where Richard was killed. Richard had killed William Brandon, Henry Tudor's standard bearer, who was second husband of Elizabeth Bruyn, heiress to one half of Beckenham Manor. William Brandon had been attained for treason by Richard as a rebel and his lands were forfeit. As he had siezed them by being Elizabeth Bruyn's second husband they were returned to Tyrell. Brandon had also siezed Elizebeth's sister Alice's moieties of property probably on the basis that Elizabeth was the surviving sister. Alice's moieties were returned to her husband John Heveningham.

1484 - catalogue item1472 - Harleian Manuscripts, British Museum. Licence for Sir John Hynyngham to enter the Manor of Bekyngham

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=PaRJAAAAcAAJ&lpg=PA283&dq=hynyngham%20bekyngham&pg=PA283#v=onepage&q=hynyngham%20bekyngham&f=false

1484 - Beckenham Manor;  Patent Rolls Richard III May 27th; 

Restitution to John Henyngham (Heveningham),  knt, of his estate as tenant for life in the moiety of the undermentioned manor...(though relevant to Southwokynton the same applies to Beckenham having been also a moiety belonging to Alice and Henyngham (Heveningham)). Note the 'unjustly expelled' comment. To this day people take sides with either Richard III or Henry Tudor (VII).  So the story may be biased one way or the other.

May 27. Whereas by an act in Parliament at Westminster, 28 January,

 624 CALENDAR OF PATENT ROLL j^gg Membrane 22 — cant.

Westminster. 1 Richard HI, it was ordained that William Brandon, esquire, should forfeit all the possessions which he held on 18 October then last past, and by an inquisition taken at Brendewode, co. Essex, on 80 September, 2 Richard III, before Thomas Lynam, then escheator, by virtue of his office, it was found that Philippa, late duchess of York and lady of the Isle of Wight, was seised of the manor of South Wokyngton, co. Essex, with the advowson of the church of South wokyngton, and two acres of land in Stifford, CO. Essex, with the advowson of the church of that town pertaining thereto in her demesne as of fee and granted the same to MauriceBruyn, knight, and Elizabeth his wife and the heirs of their bodies with remainder to the right heirs of Maurice, and the said Maurice and Elizabeth were accordingly seised of the premises in their demesne as of fee tail and on their death the premises descended to Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn as their kinswomen and heirs, viz. daughters and heirs of Henry Bruyn

their son and heir, and these accordingly entered into the premises and were seised of the same in their demesne as of fee tail and Alice married

John Henyngham, knight, and Elizabeth married the said William Brandon, and the said John and Alice had issue George and afterwards Alice died,

and after her death the said John as tenant by the law of England and the said William and Ehzabeth were seised of the premises until the said William

expelled and unjustly disseised the said John and on 28 October, 1 Richard III, was seised of one part of the premises in his demesne as of fee and of the

other part in the right of the said Elizabeth his wife, and accordingly

the premises were taken into the king's hands and are still in his hands ;

the king hereby restores to the said John Henyngham his moiety of the

premises and grants the other moiety to him and his assigns for the life

of the said William Brandon to the use of Edmund Shaa, knight, Thomas

Tyrell, esquire of the body, Richard Fitslowes and Humphrey Tyrell,

esquire, by fealty, and grants to him the issues of the manor and two acres

from Easter last during the life of the said William. By p.s.

1484 – The Manor of Foxgrove is mentioned in Records of the Exchequer at the National Archive, Kew. Parties: Richard Middelton, Esq., Lady Maud Grene his wife, and Thomas Grene, Esq & Margaret Kyng, widow, farmer of the manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham; Place or Subject: The manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham (Bekenham), [Receipt]. County: Kent

The Grenes have some importance in the early history of Foxgrove as one member of the family appears in legal documents as escheator or sheriff. But their family tree is difficult or impossible to trace and they disappear from records. Several Greens are buried in St. George's from 1710 but not necessarily the same family. One Thomas Green was attained for treason

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=jBBJAAAAcAAJ&lpg=PA337&dq=dymmok%20kyngson&pg=PA337#v=onepage&q=grene&f=false

The above link for Ancient Charters and Instruments describes Thomas Grene, son of Sir Thomas Grene arranging rents from Foxgrove Manor to Thomas Kyngson and Andrew Dymmok for their services in  recovering  other property in the Manor of Berghershe and appurtenences in Plumstead. 


1485 - This link contains details regarding the dealings between the husbands of Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn over their inherited estates. Upon Alice's death the 2nd husband of Elizabeth, William Brandon, seized the half belonging to Alice's widower, Heveningham/Henyngham. The report says that all property was repossessed by the crown and some restitution was made returning property to Heveningham. Complex in that the estates ranged fromn Essex, Kent, Hampshire etc. Also, Brandon had been attained for treason by Richard III as Brandon was a supporter of Henry Tudor who would become Henry VII after the Battle of Bosworth shortly afterwards. Subsequent hearings under Henry VII it would seem took back half of the Manor of Beckenham from Heveningham to Elizabeth's son and heir by Tyrell, her first husband. https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=qDxKAQAAMAAJ&lpg=RA8-PA128&dq=%22thomas%20tyrell%22%20bruyn&pg=RA8-PA132#v=snippet&q=henyngham&f=false

1485 - Battle of Bosworth, William Brandon killed, standard bearer to Henry Tudor and second husband of Elizabeth Bruyn, heiress of half of Beckenham Manor although her half was now in possession of the heirs of her first husband Thomas Tirrell. The battle's outcome was the death of Richard III and the end of the Wars of the Roses. Henry Tudor became Henry VII.

1485 -Foxgrove: Parties: Richard Middelton, Esq., Lady Maud Grene his wife, and Thomas Grene, Esq & Margaret Kyng, widow, farmer of the manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham; Place or Subject: The manor of Foxgrove in Beckenham (Bekenham), [Receipt]. County: Kent 2 Ric III Ref. E 326/6791 (TNA)

and Grantor: Thomas, son and heir of Thomas Grene, knight, Margaret Kyng, and Richard her son; Grantee: Thomas, Kyngson and Andrew Dymmok; Place or Subject: Grant of a rent charged on the manor of Foxgrove in the parish of Beckenham; County: Kent 2 Ric III Ref. E 327/595 (TNA)


1485 - King Henry VII until 1509

1486 - 19th June, Transcription :
Inspeximus and exemplification, at the instance of Elizabeth Brandon, widow, of the following documents:—(l.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 15 Feb.,1 Edw. IV. (Inq. 1 Edw. IV. No. 27), directed to John Grene, escheator of Kent, upon the death of Henry Bruyn, Knt. (2.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromley, co. Kent, on Saturday, 20 Feb, 1 Edw. IV.,before John Grene, the escheator, by the oaths of Richard Nether, Thomas Dawe, John Mydday, Wlliam Myddey, John Plegge, John Yorke, Henry Lapworth,Thomas Bedyll, Henry Violet, Robert Blundell, Simon Kechill, and Robert Thorp, setting forth that Henry Bruyn, knt., was seized of the manor of Beckenham, alias Beghenham (fully described), with the advowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one knights fee; and that he died 30 Nov. last; and that Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Tyrell, esq.,aged 17 years, and Alice, wife of John Berners, aged 19 years, are his daughters and heirs. (3.) A writ of diem clausit extremum dated 18 March, 13 Edw. IV.(1474) (Inq. 13 Edw. IV. No. 59), directed to John Brode,escheator of Kent, upon the death of Alice, wife of John Hevenyngham, knt. (4.) An inquisition taken thereupon at Bromlegh, co. Kent, 11 Nov, 13 Edw. IV., before John Brode, the elder, the escheator, by the oaths of John Kyere, Thomas Kyng, Simon Keehill, Henry Violet, Alexander Curteys, Stephen Kete, John Plegge, Robert Humfrey, Philip Alexander, Robert Pope, John Dare Taillour, William Bradfote, and Richard Kyng, setting forth that Alice Hevenyngham was seized of the moiety of the manor of Beghenham, and the moiety of the adrowson of the church thereof, held of the Crown in capite, by the service of one fourth part of a knights fee, and married successively John Berners, esq. (by whom she had issue John Berners), Robert Harleston esq. (by whom she had likewise issue), and John Hevenynghanl,knt. (by whom she had issue George Hevenynghaln),and that she died 15 Feb., 12 Edw. IV.;(1473) and that the said John Hevenyngham now holds the premises; and that the before-mentioned John Berners is her son and next heir, and is of the age of 10 years. Pat. p. 3. m. 5 (23).

This explains quite fully the situation regarding Alice(Bruyn) and her son and heir John Berners. Elizabeth Bruyn who had married Brandon is seemingly endorsing her right to the other moiety of Beckenham Manor.


1493 - Court of Common Pleas, names and land to be identified. 84 acres is a considerable size.
CP 25/1/117A/346, number 152.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: Two weeks from St Martin, 9 Henry VII [25 November 1493].
Parties: Roger Shelley, Thomas Polsted', William Arnold', John Reydon', Thomas Shirley, John Petteley and Thomas Shot, querents, and William Thornton' and Margaret, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 75 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow and 1 acre of wood in Bekenham'.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: William Thornton' and Margaret have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Roger, as those which Roger, Thomas, William Arnold', John, Thomas, John and Thomas have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Margaret to Roger, Thomas, William Arnold', John, Thomas, John and Thomas and the heirs of Roger for ever.
Warranty: Warranty against John, abbot of St Peter, Westminster, and his successors.
For this: Roger, Thomas, William Arnold', John, Thomas, John and Thomas have given them 40 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Roger Shelley, Thomas Polstead, William Arnold, John Reydon, Thomas Shirley, John Petley, Thomas Shott, William Thornton, Margaret Thornton
Places: Beckenham

1494 - ELIZABETH BRANDON, Post Mortem Inquisition, widow. Writ 7 March, inq. 20 June, 9 Hen. VII. Elizabeth Bruyn, late the wife of Maurice Bruyn, knt., was seised of the under-mentioned manors and lands in fee tail and had issue by the said Maurice, whom she survived, a son and heir, Henry Bruyn, knt., who died in his mother’s lifetime, leaving issue two daughters and heirs, the elder Alice, and the younger the said Elizabeth, named in the writ. The said Alice married one Robert Harleston, esq., and had issue a son John Harleston, who is now living. And afterwards the said Robert Harleston died. And the said Elizabeth, sister of Alice, married one Thomas Tyryell, esq., and had issue a son Hugh Tyryell, who is now living. And afterwards the said Elizabeth Bruyn, widow, died, and the said manors, &c., descended to the said Alice, and to the said Thomas, and Elizabeth his wife, in her right. And afterwards the said Alice married one John Hevenyngham, knt., and had issue a son George Hevenyngham, and died; and the said John Hevenyngham, knt., who survived her, is seised of her moiety of the premises, as tenant by the curtesy. And the said Thomas Tyryell died, and the said Elizabeth survived him, and took to husband one William Brandon, knt., whom she survived. She married thirdly one William Mallery, esq., whom also she survived. She died 26 March last. The said Hugh Tyryell, aged 23 and more, is her son and heir.
Immediately after his mother’s decease the said Hugh enfeoffed one Henry Colom, clk., of the moiety of the premises which then descended to him; and the said Henry Colom, at the request of the said Hugh, enfeoffed the said Hugh. and Margaret daughter of Gilbert Hussy, esq., William Hussy, knt., …….. Peter Hussy, clk., William Wylloughby, esq., son of Christopher Wylloughby, knt., Thomas Mongomery, Thomas Tyryell, and others, of the said moiety, to the use of the said Hugh and Margaret, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder in default to the said Hugh and his heirs for ever.

ELIZABETH BRANDON, widow.Writ 22 March, inq. the last day but one of May, 9 Hen. VII.She died 7 March, 9 Hen. VII, seised of a moiety of the under-mentioned manor in fee, and of a moiety of the under-mentioned advowson, as of fee and right.
Hugh Tyrell, aged 23 and more, is her son and heir.
A moiety of the manor and advowson of Bekyngham, worth 15l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight’s fee.

1494 - Immediately after his mother's decease (Elizabeth nee Bruyn) the said Hugh (Tyrell) enfeoffed one Henry Colom, clk., of the moiety of the premises (inc A moiety of the manor and advowson of Bekyngham, worth 15l., held of the King in chief, by service of 1/4 of a knight's fee.

C. Series II. Vol. 9. (14.) E. Series II. File 462. (2.)) which then descended to him; and the said Henry Colom, at the request of the said Hugh, enfeoffed the said Hugh. and Margaret daughter of Gilbert Hussy, esq., William Hussy, knt., .... Peter Hussy, clk., William Wylloughby, esq., son of Christopher Wylloughby, knt., Thomas Mongomery, Thomas Tyryell, and others, of the said moiety, to the use of the said Hugh and Margaret, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder in default to the said Hugh and his heirs for ever.

1494 - Foxgrove: 1494 Apr 15 Debtor: Thomas Green, of Northants., knight, Margaret King, of Foxgrove in the parish of Beckerham in Kent, widow, and Richard Clerk, of the parish of Plumstead in Kent, husbandman. Creditor: Richard Golofre, citizen and mercer [merchant] of London. Amount: £31. Before whom: John Brown, knight, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster. When taken: 08/09/1492 First term: 24/06/1493 Last term: 24/06/1493 Writ to: Sheriff of [Kent] Sent by: John Brown, knight, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster. Endorsement: London' Middx. Kanc' Coram d'no R' ...... sua in [crossed out: Oct' S'ti... p'x' futur] crastino Ascensionis d'ni p'x futur'.

TNA ref C 241/267/26

Foxgrove becomes more of a mystery for its earliest times as substantiating evidence for Philipot and Hasted's accounts is rare or cannot be found.
Philipot had related: Foxgrove is the last place of Account in this Parish, it had in elder times Proprietaries of this Sirname; for I find John de Foxgrove paid respective Aid for it in the twentieth year of Edward the third (1347), at making the Black Prince Knight. After this Family succeeded Bartholomew Lord 3, and he held it at his Decease, which was in the twenty ninth year of Edward the third (1356). and from him it descended to his Son Bartholomew Lord Burwash, who in the forty third year of the abovesaid Prince (1370), passed it away to Sir Walter de Paveley, and in his Family it remained untill the latter End of Richard the second, (1399) and then it was conveyed to Vaux of the County of North-Hampton, and there made its abode untill the latter End of Henry the sixth (1461), and then it was alienated to John Grene Esquire, and he died possest of it in fourth year of Edward the fourth (1465); and in this Family did the Title reside, untill the Beginning of Henry the eighth (1509), and then it was demised to Beversea, and Humphrey Beversea, I find held it in the eighteenth year of Henry the eighth (1527), and his Descendant passed it away to Luke Hollingworth, and he about the Beginning of K. Edward the sixth (1547), sold his Interest in it to Alderman Sir Jo. Oliff of London, and he dying (1577) without Issue Male, Joan(his daughter) matched (1563)to John Leigh of Addington Esquire, was his sole Heir (1577), and in Right of this Alliance, did it come down to Sir Francis Leigh (d.1644) late of East-Wickham; whose Widow Dowager the Lady Christian Leigh, is now in Possession of it.(1659 she died in 1660)

1498 -
CP 25/1/117A/347, number 240.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: Two weeks from St John the Baptist, 13 Henry VII [8 July 1498].
Parties: William Botery and William Bromwell', querents, and Henry Fyncham and Elizabeth, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 1 dove-cot, 150 acres of land, 11 acres of meadow, 71 acres of pasture and 70 acres of wood in Bekenham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Henry and Elizabeth have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of William Botery, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Elizabeth to William and William and the heirs of William Botery for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: William and William have given them 100 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: William Buttery, William Bramwell, Henry Fincham, Elizabeth Fincham
Places: Beckenham

1499 - Beckenham Manor (relevant to) Post Mortem Inquisition at the death of Sir John Heveningham, husband of Alice Bruyn. Although this does not mention the moiety of Beckenham Manor belonging to Alice and carried via her heirs down to Clement Harleston, Hevingham is mentioned in other documents in association with Beckenham Manor. The various inquisitions for Alice, Elizabeth and any of their six husbands help trace the heredity of the manor although Beckenham is a minor part of their overall properties.

JOHN HEVENYNGHAM, knight.
Writ
 23 April, 14 Henry VII; inquisition the last day of October, 15 Henry VII.
Philippa, late duchess of York, and lady of the Isle of Wight, was seised of the under-mentioned manor of Southwekyngdon and two acres of land in Stifford in fee and advowsons of Southwekyngdon and Stifford in her demesne as of fee and right, and, being so seised, by charter gave them to Maurice Bruyn, knight, and Elizabeth, then his wife, and the heirs of their bodies issuing, with remainder in default to Maurice’s right heirs. The said Maurice and Elizabeth were seised thereof accordingly in fee tail, and, being so seised, had issue Henry Bruyn, knight, who had issue Alice and Elizabeth and died; and afterwards the said Maurice died, and the said Elizabeth survived him and was seised thereof, viz. of the manor in fee tail and of the advowsons as of fee and right, by the form of the gift; and afterwards the said Alice took to husband John Berners, esquire, and the said Elizabeth took to husband Thomas Tyrell, esquire, which John Berners died and the said Alice survived him and afterwards took to husband Robert Harleston, esquire, and the same Robert and Alice had issue John, and the same Robert died and the said Alice survived him; and the said Elizabeth, late the wife of Maurice, afterwards died, seised as aforesaid, after whose death the said manor and advowsons descended to the said Alice, and Elizabeth wife of the said Thomas Tirell, cousins and heirs of the said Maurice and Elizabeth of their bodies begotten, viz. daughters of Henry, son and heir of the said Maurice and Elizabeth, whereby the said Alice in her own right and the said Thomas Tirell and Elizabeth, in right of the said Elizabeth, entered on the said manor, &c. and were seised thereof, &c.; and the said Alice being so seised took to husband John Hevenyngham, knight, named in the writ, whereby the said John and Alice and the said Thomas and Elizabeth, in right of the said Alice and Elizabeth, were seised together and without division (insimul et pro indiviso) thereof, &c., and the said John and Alice had issue George, and afterwards the said Alice died, and both the said John, and the said Thomas and Elizabeth, survived her, and the said John after her death held a moiety of the premises as tenant by the curtesy and was seised thereof in his demesne as of free tenement, and died so seised.
Clement Harleston, son of the said John Harleston son of the said Robert Harleston and Alice his wife is next heir of the said Alice late the wife of the said John Hevenyngham of her body begotten; and the said Clement Harleston the son and one William Tyrell son of the said Thomas Tyrell and Elizabeth his wife, are cousins and next heirs of the said Maurice and Elizabeth, late his wife, of their bodies begotten in form aforesaid, and the said Clement is 5 years old and more, and the said William 30 years old and more. The said John Hevenyngham died 10 May last, and the aforesaid (sic) Thomas (written over erasure) Hevenyngham the son is next heir of the said John Hevenyngham, and is 30 years old and more.
The said John Hevenyngham was seised of the other under-mentioned manors, &c., in fee, and, being so seised, thereof enfeoffed James Hobart, the king’s attorney, John Yaxlee, serjeant-at-law, John Jermy, esquire, and William Coke, the younger, who survive, together with other, since deceased, for the performance of his last will, whereby he directed that his executors should take the issues and profits thereof for half a year from his decease, and that thereafter Thomas Hevenyngham, esquire, his son and heir should have the said manors, &c., to hold to him and the heirs male of his body. He died 10 May, 14 Henry VII. The said Thomas Hevenyngham, esquire, aged 50 and more, is his son and heir. Cf. Nos. 306, 307, 425, 527.
Essex; Manor and advowson of Southwekyngdon, worth 40l., held of the king, as of the honor of Hereford, by service of one knight’s fee.
Two acres of land in Stifford, and the advowson of two parts of the church of Stifford to the said 2a. belonging, worth 6s. 8d., held of the lord Grey, service unknown.
Manor of Totham, worth 10l., held of the king, as of the honor of Hagnet, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
Manor of Goldanger, held of the king, as of the honor aforesaid, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
Manor of Bergehalle, or Bregehall, held of the king, as of the honor of Rayley, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
Manor of Flethall, and a mill in Styfford, held of the king as of the same honor, by service of 1/20 of a knight’s fee.
C. Series II. Vol
. 14. (140.) E. Series II. File 293. (16.) (BHO)

1500circa – Nicholas Brograve (of Kelseys) is involved in Chancery cases concerning property. To be researched further (TNA)

This and the following two entries for Nicholas, Edward and William Brograve imply some improper actions by the whole family?

1500 - Court of Common Pleas;
Court of Common Pleas, CP 40/954, rot. 186d

Term: Michaelmas 1500
County: London
Writ type: Debt (other); Debt (sale of goods)
Damages claimed: £10
Case type: Real action / rents / damage to real estate; Sale of goods

Pleading: Robert Bekyngham. claims that Edward Brograve owes him 4m. Robert B. claims that at London on 10/09/1496 he demised to Edward B. the rectory of Beckenham, Kent, with all its fruits, oblations, tenths, and other dues of the same rectory, to be had and occupied by the same EB from the feast of the annunciation of St Mary then next following (25/03/1497) until the same feast then next following (25/03/1498), namely, for one whole year, at an annual rent of £18, payable to RB at the feasts of the nativity of St John the Baptist (24/06/1497), Michaelmas (29/09/1497), Christmas (25/12/1497), and Easter (15/04/1498) in equal portions. RB says that by force of this demise EB had and occupied the aforesaid rectory from the same 10/09/1496, for one entire year then next following. RB says that of the £4 10s payment of the aforesaid £18 annual rent which was due at Christmas 1497, EB did not pay 40s, which same 40s is in arrears and a parcel of the aforesaid 4m debt. RB also says that at London on the same aforesaid 10/09/1496 EB bought from him 2 cartloads of hay for 13s 4d, which hay has not been paid for. Together the 40s arrears of rents and 13s 4d from the sale of hay add up to the said 4m debt. Damages are claimed at £10.

Pleading: EB defends and seeks licence to imparl as far as Hilary term 1501.

Postea text: postea 1 - further licence to imparl, forwarding the case as far as Easter term 1501.

  Court of Common Pleas, CP 40/954, rot. 234d

Term: Michaelmas 1500
County: Kent
Writ type: Trespass (force and arms)
Damages claimed: £10
Case type: Housebreaking; Taking of goods

Pleading: William Brograve is in mercy for many defaults. William Botery and William Bromwell claim that on 10/03/1499 William Brograve used force and arms to break their close at Beckenham, Kent, where he felled and carried off their trees and underwood to the value of 100s. The trees and underwood taken were, namely, 60 oak trees, 20 ash trees, and twenty cartloads of underwood. Damages are claimed at £10.
Pleading: William Brograve defends and seeks licence to imparl as far as Hilary term 1501. (BHO)


1500 - Kenthouse: (This case relates some ownership and occupation of Kent House)
Court of Common Pleas, CP 40/951, rot. 115 Term: Hilary 1500 County: Kent Writ type: Trespass (force and arms) Damages claimed: £20
Damages awarded: 3s 4d
Costs: 20s
Case type: Housebreaking; Real action / rents / damage to real estate; Taking of goods; Trespass (chattels)
Pleading: Henry Fyncham. and John Henley. claim that on 24/03/1497 John Fabyan. used force and arms to break their close at Beckenham, Kent, to seize and carry off their goods and chattels to the value of 20m, and allowed his livestock to trample and consume their grass to the value of 100s. Henry Fyncham and John Henley say that the goods and chattels taken were, namely: 2 benches; 6 stools; 2 millstones; 2 andirons; 2 feather beds; and 4 mattresses. The livestock which trampled and consumed the grass was, namely, horses, oxen, cows, and sheep. HF and JH say that this livestock was in their close on diverse days over a period of four months next following the aforesaid 24/03/1497. Damages are claimed at £20. Pleading: John Fabyan says that he is innocent and puts himself upon the country, and the plaintiffs, HF and JH put themselves likewise. Order to the sheriff of Kent to make a jury come at the octave of the Purification 1500.
Postea text: postea 1 - the jury between the arties is placed in respite as far as Easter term in five weeks 1500.
Postea text: postea 2 - to this day comes defendant JF and plaintiffs HF and JH. A jury comes and says on oath that JF is innocent of seizing and carrying off the aforesaid chattels. The jury also says that a certain Stephen Fabyan. was seised in his demesne and as of fee of one messuage called 'Kenthous' and 300 acres of land with appurtenances at Beckenham, in which the supposed trespass took place. So seised in his lifetime prior to the time of the supposed trespass, the same SF and the aforesaid JF being together in a certain house of the aforesaid messuage together said that that same Stephen Fabyan wished (vellet) the profits of the same tenement and lands during his lifetime, and that after the death of SF, JF and his heirs should have the same messuage and lands with appurtenances in perpetuity. Later SF and JF withdrew from that same house into a certain field which was part of the aforesaid 300 acres of land and then SF said again that he wished to have the value of the profits from the messuage and lands with appurtenances during his life, and for JH to have the messuage and lands after his death. Upon this SF then gave drink, to whichever of William T., Robert W., William B., and others who had peen present until this point, and requested them to testify to his words. And the jury say on oath that if it is the will of the law that nothing be transferred by the words of SF nor anything be enfeoffed, then the jury say that SF later died so seised in his demesne and as of fee, after whose death the same messuage and lands descended to a certain Elizabeth (F.) now the wife of plaintiff HF, as one of the daughters and heirs of the late SF, and to plaintiff JH as grandson of the late SF, namely as the son of Katherine (F.) another of SF's daughters. At the time of SF’s death, JH in his own right and HF by right of his wife Elizabeth Fabyan entered the aforesaid messuage and lands, and continued in possession of them for around the space of one month then next following. Thereafter, at the time of the aforesaid supposed trespass, defendant JF made entry into the same property and continued in possession of it for the 27 weeks then next following. Thereafter, plaintiffs JH and HF re-entered the property. And the jury say that defendant JF, for the 27 weeks he was in possession, allowed his cattle to trample and consume grass upon the messuage and lands just as JH and HF alleged. The jury assesses JH and HF’s damages at 3s 4d and their costs at 20s. Therefore, the decision is that JH and HF are to recover from JF costs and damages of 23s 4d. JF is to be arrested. JH and HF are in mercy for false claim against JF concerning the seizing and carrying off of the aforesaid goods and chattels, concerning which JF is quit.Postea text: postea 3 - 10/07/1501 HF and JH come before the court and acknowledge satisfaction of the aforesaid damages. Therefore, JF is quit.Case notes: The jury recounts a verbal transmission of property which the justices decide is invalid.

1500 - Unidentified properties
CP 25/1/117A/348, number 305.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: The day after St Martin, 16 Henry VII [12 November 1500].
Parties: William Causton' (or William Canston'), querent,(Plaintiff) and Andrew Lyt[yl]grome and Margaret, his wife, deforciants.(One who keeps out of possession the rightful owner of an estate.
Property: A third part of 4 messuages, of 80 acres of land, of 2 acres of meadow, of 4 acres of wood and of 1 acre of marsh in Westwykham, Bekenham, Bromeley and Lewesham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Andrew and Margaret have acknowledged the third part of the tenements to be the right of William, as that which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed it from themselves and the heirs of Margaret to him and his heirs for ever.
Warranty: Warranty by Andrew and Margaret for themselves and the heirs of Andrew.
For this: William has given them 20 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: William Cawston (or William Canston), Andrew Littlegroom, Margaret Littlegroom
Places: West Wickham, Beckenham, Bromley, Lewisham

1501 – An entry in the Treasury of Receipts dated 22nd of May in the 10th year of Henry VIII, is of interest:
"Costys ande charges hade and made by the Kinge is Comaundment opon the makinge of a newe barke namyde the Kateryn Plesuance for the transportynge of his grace to Calice. Xxij(22nd) daye of Maye Ao x Hen. VIII. Payde also to Herry Kynge of becknam for the carriage of a xi (eleven) lode of tymber from chelsam (Probably Chelsham in Surrey) – at ijs (eleven shillings) eny lode xxijs (twentytwo shillings). Itm to him pd for ix (9) lode cariage out of bromley pishe at xvj (16) di lode xijs (twelve shillings)."

The ship referred to was the one which conveyed Henry VIII to Calais in June 1520, when that monarch met Francis I of France at the Field of the Cloth of Gold, at Ardres, near Calais. (source: R.Borrowman)

1501 - Kent House; National Archive ref C 131/87/2 Related to half of Kent House. Henry Colet being in debt to John Style (of Langley?) His property is transferred to Style.

Debtor: Henry Fincham, formerly a citizen and mercer, of London.

Creditor: John Style, citizen and mercer, of London.

Amount: £100.

Before whom: Henry Colet, Mayor of the Staple of Westminster.

When taken: 22/03/1501

First term: 24/06/1501

Last term: 24/06/1501

Writ to: Sheriff of Kent

Sent by: Chancery

Endorsement: William Crowmere, Sheriff, replies that the execution of the writ appears in the schedule hereto annexed.


Inquisition and return: Date to be returned: 01/7/1504. The Sheriff had replied to a previous writ that on the day of the recognisance Henry (Colet) was seised of: half a messuage in Beckenham, called Kenthous, and half of 60 acres of land, 100 acres of pasture, and 20 acres of meadow in Beckenham [in Bromley-&-Beckenham Hundred] and Lewisham [in Blackheath Hundred], worth £3 6s. 8d. He also had certain chattels, namely: 2 oscula pacis, called Paxs, two curtains with iron rings, an old breviary, 2 small bells, called sacring bells {sakering bellys}, 2 old altar-cloths, a stone for an altar, a corporal case, a vestment, an alb, with other vestments necessary for a priest, a noted missal, 8 images, a round cassock dyed violet in grain, trimmed with grey fur, a long cassock of the same colour, 4 cruets, a woollen cloth, called a blanket, 4 blankets of fustian, a coverlet with a lion on it, another coverlet of a green colour, 2 painted cloths, one of St Katherine, and the other of St Barbara, a bench-cover, 4 chairs, called Spruce Chairs, a canopy, called a Spire, a pair of cups, an old carpet, 4 brass pots, 6 brass pans, a table, called a dressing-board, 7 shelves, 3 plain boards, 2 pot-hooks, an iron bar, other knives, utensils, a grindstone, a water-trough, 2 half-hundred-weights, 2 weights of iron, called hundredweights, 2 malt vats, a pound of paper, a French book, a short tunic, called a waistcoat, a chafing-dish, 3 tubs, a crabb-apple {crabbe} press, a mortar ..., a cupboard, a pottle pot, 63 lb. of broken brass, 80½ lb. of lead weights, 2 candle-cases, 4 lattices for putting next to the fire, a stool, a form, weed-hooks, certain grain growing in the ground and in the barn, and other goods: worth altogether £24 10s. 10d. Henry was not found in the bailiwick. Attached to this is a letter from the Sheriff, dated 30/06/1504, which says that he has delivered to John Style half of the messuage and lands in the writ and the goods and chattels. [a duplicate of No. 4 and No. 18] (BHO)



1501 - Unkown messuage;

CP 25/1/117A/349, number 345.
Link: Image of document at AALT
Link: Image of dorse of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: One week from St Martin, 17 Henry VII [18 November 1501]. And afterwards one week from St Hilary in the same year [20 January 1502].
Parties: Thomas Marowe and John More, querents, and Edmund Midday and Lettice, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 24 acres of land, 8 acres of meadow, 10 acres of pasture and 5 acres of wood in Bekenham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Edmund and Lettice have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of John, as those which John and Thomas have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Lettice to Thomas and John and the heirs of John for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: Thomas and John have given them 40 pounds sterling.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Thomas Marrow, John Moore, Edmund Middey, Lettice Middey
Places: Beckenham

1503 - Kent House; Memorandum of Acknowledgement (November). A transfer of the property it seems by inhereitance of Katherine and Elizabeth Fabyan daughters of Stephen Fabyan.

John Fabyan of Bekenham, gentleman, son and heir of John Fabyan, clothier of London, to John Henley of Cranebroke co. Kent, 'clothman,' son of Robert Henley of London, draper, and Katharine his wife, a daughter and heir of Stephen Fabyan late of Bekenham, gentleman, and Henry Fyncham late of London, mercer, and Elizabeth his wife, Stephen's other daughter, their heirs and assigns. The like of Kenthous manor in Bekenham and all the lands etc. late of Stephen in Bekenham and Leuesham co. Kent and Bateresey co. Surrey. Dated 1 Sept., 19 Henry VII. (BHO). Some curiosity exists here as Henry Fyncham was in debt to John Style in 1501 through Court of Chancery and Style may have acquired half of Kent House by way of payment of the debt.


1504 - Court of Common Pleas, to be identified

CP 25/1/117A/350, number 407.

Link:

Image of document at AALT

Link:

Image of dorse of document at AALT

County:

Kent.

Place:

Westminster.

Date:

Three weeks from Easter, 19 Henry VII [28 April 1504].

Parties:

Richard Guldeford', knight, Thomas Brandon', knight, Edmund Dudley, esquire, and John Gardyner, querents, and Robert Sympson', gentleman, and Cecily, his wife, deforciants.

Property:

7 messuages, 7 gardens, 1 mill, 1 dove-cot, 160 acres and half an acre of land, 43 acres of meadow, 63 acres of pasture, 68 acres of wood and 20 acres of heath in Bromlegh'BekenhamLeueshamChesilhurstOrpyngton' and Hese.

Action:

Plea of covenant.

Agreement:

Robert and Cecily have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Richard, as those which Richard, Thomas, Edmund and John have of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Cecily to Richard, Thomas, Edmund and John and the heirs of Richard for ever.

Warranty:

Warranty.

For this:

Richard, Thomas, Edmund and John have given them 200 pounds sterling.


1505 - Beckenham and Foxgrove; Post Mortem Inquisition Writ 29 November, inquisition 2 February, 21 Henry VII.WALTER FITZ.

Roger Fitz was seised in fee of the under-mentioned lands &c. in Leuesham and Bekenham, and by his charter indented dated at Leuesham, 20 March, 19 Henry VII, gave them to Peter Bevyll, Roger Holand, William Honychurch, Thomas Ifley, George Harvy, Robert Morley and William Morley, who survive, and the said Walter Fitz, since deceased, and their heirs, to the use of Isabel, his wife, now wife of William Atclyff, for life, and after her death to the use of himself and his heirs. Afterwards, to wit, on 28 March, 19 Henry VII, the said Roger by his last will willed that after the death of Isabel the said Peter Bevyll and the others should stand enfeoffed of the said lands &c. to the use of the said Walter, his brother, and the heirs male of his body, and in default of such heirs male to the use of himself, the said Roger and his heirs.
Walter died 3 June last, seised of the other under-mentioned lands &c. in fee tail, to wit, to himself and the heirs of his body. John Fitz, aged 9 years and more, is his son and sole next heir.

12 messuages, 200a. pasture, 300a. meadow and 400a. wood in Leuesham and Bekenham, worth 40 marks, held as to the messuages &c. in Leuesham of the said prior of Shene and Thomas, marquess of Dorset, by fealty and 8s. rent, and as to the messuages &c. in Bekenham of William Terell, as of his manor of Bekenham, and Thomas Grene, knight, as of his manor of Foxgroves in Bekenham, by 7s. rent.



By the above we may deduce that  Fitz had leased for a substantial period Manor of Beckenham land belonging to Terell(Tyrell) and Foxgrove Manor land belonging to Grene as well as the land of the Prior of Shene and Marquess of Dorset (Penge and Sydenham perhaps).



1507 -

CP 25/1/117A/351, number 489.
Link: Image of document at AALT
County: Kent.
Place: Westminster.
Date: The day after the Purification of the Blessed Mary, 22 Henry VII [3 February 1507].
Parties: Thomas Kemsale, querent, and Robert Holden' and Joan, his wife, deforciants.
Property: 1 messuage, 16 acres of land, 5 acres of pasture, 5 acres of wood and 6 acres of heath in Bekenham.
Action: Plea of covenant.
Agreement: Robert and Joan have acknowledged the tenements to be the right of Thomas, as those which he has of their gift, and have remised and quitclaimed them from themselves and the heirs of Joan to him and his heirs for ever.
Warranty: Warranty.
For this: Thomas has given them 20 marks of silver.

Standardised forms of names. (These are tentative suggestions, intended only as a finding aid.)
Persons: Thomas Kempsall, Robert Holden, Joan Holden
Places: Beckenham

1509 King Henry VIII until 1547

1509 - Langley about the beginning of Henry. the eighth,(1509)  it was conveyed to John Stiles Esq; who much inlarged the House with a supply of Buildings, and from him is it by Descent devolved to be the instant Possession of his Successor Sir Humphrey Stiles Knight and Baronet.(d1552) (source: Philipot)

John Stiles died in 1500 and his will probate dated 1501 is before Henry VIII's accession in 1509. Either John Stiles death date is substantially wrong or it was his heir Sir Humphrey who made the additions.

1510 - About the year 1510, Foxgrove came into the family of Baversea. Humphrey Baversea (Philipot)

1511 - Foot of Fine: Foxgrove: Sir Nic Vaus & wife Anne & Sir Thos Parre & wife Matilda to Gerard Danet, esq, Wm Lane, Geo Boywell. Manors of Burwash & Foxgrove w/300a land, 100a mead, 300a past, 500a wood & 300a waste in Burwash, Plumstead & 'Foxgrove', plus land in 7 other counties. Enfeoffment. (51/358 no. 17)

Gerard Danet etc. are new names to associate with Foxgrove. (source Kent Archaeology)

1513 - Foot of Fine: Kent House: Thos Wells & wife Margy to Jn Cowlard, mercer of London, Thos Baldry, Robt Clerkson & Wm Bromwell. Moiety of manor of Kenthouse w/300a land, 20a mead, 100a past & 30a wood in Beckenham & Lewisham; plus land in Battersea, Surrey. 100 mks. (51/360 no. 25) (Kent Arch.)

1514 (this section needs to be checked against Hasted) Beckenham Mannor being annexed to the patrimony of Thomas Tirrell, Humphrey Tirrell his Grandchild to whom it descended, passed away one Moietie of it in the thirty fifth year of Henry the eighth (1514) to Ralph Warren, and the other to Henry Parke;

Warren alienated his Proportion not long after to Bradbury. But Lysons regards the involvement of Warren and Parke as related to mortgages, loans or, more likely, leases? We know that the Tyrells were established in Essex and that their part of Beckenham Manor descended to Dalston and Curwen later in the 17th C. through marriages. see 1505 and the lease of William Terell's(Tyrell's) Manor of Beckenham in the occupancy of the Fitz's or their tenants.

1514 the other Moitie or half of Beckenham Manor by Joan sole Heir of the abovesaid Henry Parke, came to be the Inheritance of Mr. Robert Leigh descended out of Cheshire, whose Successor about the latter End of King James (1620-25) alienated it to Snelgrave.(Philipot). 

But I believe this to be a misunderstanding on Philipot's part although some evidence is scarce and Lysons remarks about probable loans or mortgages. Suffice it to say that from the time of Henry Bruyn's daugthers, Alice and Elizabeth and their multiple marriages. One half of Beckenham Manor descended via the Tyrells to Dalston and Curwen thence to Oliver St. John. The other half descended via Harleston to Leigh and then to Snelgrave who's grandson sold to Walter and Henry St. John via John Evelyn.

1514 - Foot of Fine; Kenthouse; Thos Wells & wife Margy to Jn Cowlard, mercer of London, Thos Baldry, Robt Clerkson & Wm Bromwell. Moiety of manor of Kenthouse w/300a land, 20a mead, 100a past & 30a wood in Beckenham & Lewisham; plus land in Battersea, Surrey. 100 mks. (51/360 no. 25)(Kent Arch.)

A Moiety describes part of the property. Kenthouse had been divided into two parts in other evidence.

1517 - Lay Subsidy; In the assessment for a lay subsudy in the twentysixth year of Henry VIII (1517), Beckenham appears at £4 8s. And the subsidy is made up as follows: Robert Brograve for his lands xvs (15shillings), Humphrey Style for his lands xxxiiis (33shillings), Edward Alegh for his goods xvs (15 shillings), Henry Vyolett for his goods xvs (15 shillings), Henry King vs (5 shillings), Isabell Dunce for her goods xvs (15 shillings). 

Humphrey Style: Langley, Robert Brograve: Kelsey, Edward Alegh possibly Foxgrove (but not for lands?) (source: R.Borrowman)

The name of Vyolett is curious given Philipot's account of Langley which he states passed from Ralph Langley to John Violett and then to the Styles. Henry Vyolett in this Lay Subsidy is assessed for goods and not land. Foxgrove was supposedly in the hands of Baversea, but its another name not mentioned. Did Borrowman overlook any valuation for Beckenham Manor under the Tyrells and Harlestons? or perhaps not recognise their names as being associated with the manor. One writer, John Sheail 1968, observes that a lot of documentation from the Lay Subsidies of the 1500's has been lost.

1518 - Kenthouse; Court of Chancery; Short title: Fyncham v Yarford. Litigation

Plaintiffs: Henry Fyncham of London, gentleman, son-in-law of Stephen Fabyan of London, draper.

Defendants: James Yarford of London, knight.

Subject: Half a messuage and land called `Kenthous' in Beckenham and Lewisham, late of the said Stephen.

Kent.

2 documents


Apparently Stephen Fabyan had recently died and maybe Yarford was in occupancy of this part of Kenthouse and Fyncham was heir of Fabyan the landlord. see 1500 and 1503



1527 - Unknown property; Letters and papers, foreign and domestic, Henry VIII. Sir Wm. Compton, under-treasurer of the Exchequer. Grant of three tenements near the dock at Byllyngysgate, Greenwich, Kent, and lands in Estgrenewich, Westgrenewich, Depford, Leuesham, Kedbroke, Charleton, Wolwich, Beknam and Chesseleste, and the neighborhood. Del. Westm.,—18 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. 18 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 29. (BHO)


1529 - May; Unknown  property, see 1527. Henry Norres, squire for the Body. Grant of three tenements in "le Westend," Grenewiche, Kent, near the dock at Billyngysgate in Grenewiche, land in Grenewiche Marshe, called Bendysh, in Eltham, Charlton, Wolwich, and elsewhere, and lands called the Queen's lands, in East and West Grenewiche, Deptford, Lovesham, Kedbroke, Charlton, Wolwiche, Beknam and Cheflest (Chiselhurst ?) Kent. The premises were held by Sir Wm. Compton till his death, 29 June last. Del. Westm., 1 May 21 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 26. (BHO)

1530 - Beckenham Manor (one moiety) Letters and Papers foreign and domestic, Henry VIII 1531/32; Clement Harleston, of Coksale, Essex. Licence to alienate his moiety or purparty of the manor of Bekenham, Kent, and his messuages, &c. in Bekenham, to Robert Legh, Roger Starkey, Mathew Haddes, John Preston, William Lamberd, Robert Meredith, and Richard Malery, citizens and mercers, London; to the use of the said Robert, his heirs and assigns for ever. Westm., 29 March. Pat. 22 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m 14. (BHO)

Just prior to this it seems Harleston was pursuing a Nicholas Leveson about deeds for Beckenham Manor and other properties and Humphrey and William Tyrell as owners of the other moiety of the Manor were called as witnesses. All part of the complexity of the split manor and several husbands of Alice and Elizabeth Bruyn

Lysons had said "Manor of Beckenham: Clement Harleston sold it, in 1530, to Robert Legh, Esq., whose descendant of the same name, in 1610, aliened it to Henry Snelgar, or Snelgrave, Esq.  Lysons account differs in some respects to Hasted probably due to some vaguaries regardng the Bruyns, Tyrells and Dalstons. Even now we have reason to question same aspects, namely the possibility that Maude de la Rokele brought the manor over to the Bruyns rather than Isolda who's family name is unknown.

1531 - A foot of fine referenced by Kent Archaeology; Clem(ent) Harleston, esq & wife Margt to Robt Legh, Rog Starky, Matt Haddes, Jn Preston, Wm Lamberde, Robt Meredyth & Ric Malary. Moiety of manor of Beckenham w/500a land, 200a mead, 500a past & 500a wood in Beckenham. £300.

This raises some questions about the extent of the manor as a subsequent foot of fine regarding the other moiety of Beckenham Manor under the Tyrells is described as the same acreages. "Hum Tyrrell, esq & wife Joan to Guy Crafford of London, esq. Moiety of manor of Beckenham w/500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood & 500a waste in Beckenham. Enfeoffment." although it adds 'waste' which is probably Penge Common. However, the two moieties  were equal in size but the 1623 map drawn for Dalston and Snelgrave describes a total of 936 acres.

1531 - Beckenham, Penge etc.; This will describes property and probably links with some lands called Reddons and similar. (source; Kent Archaeology)

 Henry Rydon - Will 10 Dec 1531,

Return to Book 14 Contents Page

13. Thower

10 Dec 1531. Henry Rydon of Battersey in Surre yoman. To be buried within the parisshe churche of Battersey as nighe unto Joanne late my wyfe as may be. To the Roodelight 3/4, Our Lady lyht in the high chauncell there 3/4. To owr ladye lighte in Sainte Nicolas Chauncell there 3/4. To the mayntence of Sainte Katherines light Vs. To eche of the ploughe light and Sainte Xtofer lighte 20d, toSaint George light 12d. At buryng 15 preests and 4 new torches and to be geven ij to Battersey (Battersea) on to Waunesworth (Wandsworth), to the paroche churche of Claphan an other. Months mind with 15 preests at dirige and masse for me and Joane late my wyfe and breade ale and chese at the saide churche thereto be dalte to every personne that will take yt. Obytt within the churche of Battersey for my soule etc. A coope of velvet broderid to the valew of £6.13.4. to the churche of Battersey and the saide cope to have in the mydds of the backe a scripture broderid in these words following:
   Pray for the sowle of Henry Rydon and Joane his wyfe oon whoo soules God have mercye.
   To Margerye my wyfe in goods etc £100.
   To Robert my sonne my leas or Covent seale with the yeres conteyned in the same I hold and have of my Lorde Abbott priour and covent of Westmynster of the manor or lordeshippe of Battersey for terme yeres and if he die or he come to 21 yeres then to Henry my sonne at 21. I will my cosyn Robert Kyng of Beckenham in Kent, yoman shall occupie my said ferme yf he be dispoased to the use of the said Robert my sonne putting in sufficent surtes to be bounden to Nicolas ?Harris and Elizabeth his wyfe my doughter.
   My wyfe Margerye to have an honest Chamber for her and a mayden within the said ferme by the space of oon hole yere after my decease. I will the £100 to Margery my wyfe shall stand and be to her in and for full satisfacon of all suche goods or stuff whiche were sold by me to Thomas Kyrry of London ?salfe parcell of the muentarye of the goods of Thos Otley whils he levid of London, Grocer her late husband.
   To Elizabeth Harrys my doughter a gold ryng, a littl gilt pott, etc. To Nicolas Harrys my gowne coloroid browne tawny.
   To Robert my sonmne bothe my best livereys gownes. To my uncle Henry King my gowne colorid medley furred with blacke lambe. Among the servunts of the now Abbott of the monasterye of Westmynster 6/8. To and among the servunts of the monke Bayly there 3/4 and of the priour 3/4. To Henry Rydon thelder 6/8, a maare with her foole, ij steryes and a yong heyfer. To Richd King my servunt 6/8, my baye maare with her fole, a cow, bullock, etc. To John Nichell my servunt 6/8, a gray ambling maare, etc. To John Harmon my servunt 6/8, a trotting bay nagg etc. To Thos King my gowne colorid medley. To John Lysteney my sheppard 6/8.
Residew to Robert and Henry my sonnes when 21. If both die then to Nicolas Harrys and Elizabeth his wyfe, my doughter.
    I make Nicolas Harris and Robert Kyng extours. Wit. Sir Wm Bayly curate of the said churche of Battersey, Richd Holte, Thurstone Asheley, Rauf Hunter and John Hulson.
    This is: of all my lands etc. in Battersey in Surrey and in Westerham, Bromeley, Beckenham and Lewisham in Kent. I will Margerye my wife have one annyte of £5 yerely owte of all my londs etc. that is 50s owte of my lands in Battersey and Wannesworth and other 50s owte of my lands in Westerham, Bromeley, Beckenham and Lewisham for her lyfe.
   I will that Robert Ryden my sonne when 21 all my lands as well free as customary in Battersey and Wannesworth in Surrey. I will also that Henry Rydon my sonne when 21 shalhave all my lands, tenements, etc. in Westerham, Bromeley, Beckenham and Lewisham for ever.
    I will my cosyn Robert King of Bekenham, yoman shalhave the Rule and governance and letting etc of all the saide lands willed to the said Robert durying all the noneage of the same Robert.
   I will that Nicolas Harrys my sonne in law shall have the Rule etc. of the lands etc. appoynted to Henry my sonne during his noneage [in each case to pay the 50s to Margery my wife and 20s for the use etc. of the son].
   Probate 4 Jan 1531.


1535 - Foxgrove; An Act concerning the assurance of certain lands to the Lady Elizabeth Vaux in recompence of her jointure

Where before this time Syr Thomas Vaux Knyght Lorde Harrowdon, in consideracion of marriage had betwene hym and the Lady Elizabeth Nowe his Wife Doughter and Heire to Sir Thomas Cheyny Knyght deceased, laufully assured unto the seid Lady Elizabeth for time of ther lyfe amongst others the Manour of Grene Norton in the Countie aforesaid...

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=B7o4AQAAMAAJ&lpg=PA580&dq=vaux%20foxgrove&pg=PA579#v=onepage&q=vaux%20foxgrove&f=false

1536-1541 Dissolution of the Monastries under Henry VIII; 

1538 - Unidentified property; Letters and papers, foreign and domestic Henry VIII; see 1527 and 1529; Ric. Long, King's servant. Lands in Greenwich, the "Queen's lands" in East Greenwich, West Greenwich, Dexforde (sic), Levesham, Kedbroke, Charleton, Wolwyche, Beknam, and Chesselhest, Kent, forfeited by Hen. Norres, and Old Court manor in Greenwich. Undated. (BHO)

1540 –1545 - From Hasted’s history of Kent and quotting Thomas Philipott in Villare Cantianum recorded that “Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, son of Elizabeth Bruyn, by her second husband, resided in the manor-house of Beckenham as lessee; and that he entertained Henry VIII there, "and here entertained Henry the eighth, with all the Cunning Pompe of Magnificence, as he went to bestow a Visit at Hever, on his discarded, and repudiated wife Ann of Cleve." (Henry married Anne of Cleves in 1540 and he died in 1547 but Brandon died in 1545 so if true it must have been within this 1540/45 five year window.)

For clarity this is the old manor house opposite St. George’s Church and not what we refer to as the Mansion in Beckenham Place. 

Hever had been the home of the Boleyne’s but after Henry VIII had Ann Boleyn or Bullen and her brother executed he confiscated Hever and subsequently rented it to his fourth and ex-wife Anne of Cleve. In my understanding local folklore referred to Henry VIII staying in Beckenham on his way to see Anne Boleyne but maybe I misunderstood it. Philipott’s version is the earliest we have rediscovered at this time which describes Beckenham in any detail.

Philipott writes of Hever: “Hever in the Hundreds of Somerden and Ruxley, had in elder Times a Castle, which was the Capital Seat or Mannor built by Thomas de Hever, who had liberty by the Charter of Edward the third, granted to him in the fourth of his Raign, not only to embattle his Mansion here, but likewise had Free-warren annexed to his Lands in this place. William Hever deceased without Issue Male, and left only two Daughters and Co-heirs; Joane married to Reginald Cobham of Sterborough, and the other wedded to Brocas, whence in Records it is sometimes called Hever Cobham and Hever Brocas, and when the Cobhams went out, the Bullens were the immediate Purchasers; for Geffrey Bullen purchased this Place, and his Grand-child Sir Thomas Bullen Knight of the Garter, and Earl of Wilts, lived here, who was Father to Anne Bullen, Wife to Henry the eighth; and as he had here his Habitation, so likewise he has here his Sepulcher, and lieth emtombed in Hever-church; but when his Son George Viscount Rochford, upon pretence of some black Crimes acted against the Majesty of Henry the eighth, fell under the Censure of High Treason; this upon his Attainder or Conviction was escheated to the Crown, and began to be reputed a Mansion of some Estimate, when Anne of Cleve for some Time lived here, and made it her residence; but, in Times subsequent to this, I find it eminent for nothing, till King James granted it to Sir Edward Waldgrave, whose Successor yet possesses it.”

This just needs a bit of clarification but of no impact on our history of Beckenham. However, maybe it’s an example of how information becomes distorted, confusing the two Anne’s associated with Henry VIII and Hever. Hevercastle.co.uk states: In 1540 Henry VIII married his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves. Henry’s decision to marry Anne was based on a portrait miniature painted by Hans Holbein. The marriage was made for political reasons but ended in divorce six months later. Henry VIII awarded her the honorary title of ‘The King’s Sister’, £500 a year, a sufficient household and two houses. In addition, he allowed her to lease a number of manors to enhance her status and income, including Hever, at an annual rent of £9-13s-3½d. Anne settled happily in England and became good friends of the King and Anne Boleyn’s daughter, the future Queen Elizabeth I.

Anne of Cleves had Hever Castle until her death in 1557 but it is not known how much time she spent at the Castle. However, there is a surviving letter written by Anne to Mary Tudor in 1554 signed ‘from my poore house of Hever’.

Henry VIII took Hever from the Boleyne’s or Bullens as Anne Boleyne had been accused of adultery with her brother etc.

1541 - Foot of Fine: Kelsey:  Robt Brogreve, esq & Margt Parker, wid. to Robt Chidley & Robt Hamond. Manor of Kelsellys w/3a mead, 155a past & 160a wood in Beckenham. Enfeoffment. (40) (Trinity) (Kent Arch.)

Acknowledges a lease as the land remains Brograve

1541 - Foot of Fine: Beckenham Manor Tyrell moiety: Hum Tyrrell, esq & wife Joan to Guy Crafford of London, esq. Moiety of manor of Beckenham w/500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood & 500a waste in Beckenham. Enfeoffment. (17) (Kent Arch.) Acknowledges a lease as the land remains Tyrell 

1544 - Licences to alienate lands: Humph. Tyrrell to Sir Ralph Warren, alderman. Moiety of Bekenham manor and of lands (extent given) in Bekynham, Kent, and of the advowson of Bekenham church. (12th.) P. 18, m. 10. (BHO)

Tyrell's moiety was the half of Beckenham Manor which descended via Dalston, Curwen to Oliver Style. This implies that Warren's occupancy was under a lease. Evidence points to this moiety being the 'Park' surrounding the Manor House, Copers Cope Farm and Church shown on the 1623 map which describes the part near Penge and other outlying parts as being Snelgrove's in 1623.

About this time the quagmire of the ownership of Beckenham Manor is tied up in the family affairs of the Tyrells. The potential absence of  direct heirs looks like the property ownership jumped across lines of generations ie to brothers and nephews. We also have evidence from Keith Baldwin that errors in othere accounts confuse matters. History of Parliament has a Catherine Tyrell marrying John Dalston whereas we believe  it was an Ann Tyrell daughter of Robert who carried Beckenham Manor to Dalston. Even the legal historians have problems with the affairs of the Tyrells http://nbls.soc.srcf.net/files/files/Legal%20History/Supervision%205/2.%20Jones.pdf
suffice it to say, just as Philipot and Hasted found, that the Tyrell moiety of Beckenham Manor descended to Dalston and then the chain to Curwen and the St. Johns becomes clear. Later however some confusion occurs within the St. Johns due to the complexity in their affairs.

1547 - King Edward VI until 1553

1547 - Foxgrove: Luke Hollingworth, who, about the year 1547, sold it to Sir John Olyffe whose only daughter and heir (Joan) married John Leigh, Esq. of Addington, in Surrey. From him, it later descended to Sir Francis Leigh, d1711. (Via Sir Oliph Leigh, Sir Francis Leigh, Sir Thomas Leigh, Then Sir Francis Leigh d1711) (Philipot/Hasted)

1547 - The will of Elis Bodley, parson of Beckenham mentions his residence at Beckenham and several bequests to local people.

1548 - Foot of Fine; Q: Ric, Geo and Thos, Caryll. D: Geo Forman & wife Agnes. 1 mess, 80a land, 20a mead, 100a past, 60a wood in Hayes, W. Wickham, Beckenham & Bromley. 200 marks.(Kent Arch) Unidentified but if a contiguous parcel of land  could be Shortlands, Pickhurst, Langley area.

1549 - Foot of Fine; Q: Wm Parker. D: Hum Tyrrell, esq. Moiety of Manor of Beckenham with 40 mess, 500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Bromley, Hayes, Lewisham. £400. (Kent Arch). The amount of land mentioned in these documents is impossible to reconcile with later audits of land but here this half of the Manor of Beckenham is said to extend into surrounding areas. Also the 40 messuages describes the farms and smallholdings that the manor is divided into. Waste we are thinking may describe Penge Common or Hayes Common.

1549 - Foot of Fine; Q: Thos Sirrell,(Tirrell?) esq. D: Wm Parker & wife Margy. Manor of Beckenham with 40 mess, 500a land, 200a mead, 500a past, 500a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Hayes, Bromley, Lewisham. £400.

1550 - Foot of Fine; Q: Th Gavell, Rob Wylloughbye, gent. D: Ric Caryll & wife Clement, Geo, Th Caryll gents. 2 mess, 160a land, 20a mead, 160a past, 40a wood £1 rent in Westerham, Edenbridge, Hayes, W. Wickham, Beckenham, Bromley & Farnborough. 200 marks. (Kent Arch). The divers areas implies this property is widely spread and divided although described as 2 messuages.Although Hayes, West Wickham, Bromley and Beckenham can in theory be connected by one parcel of land Westerham and Edenbridge are a significant distance away.

1552 - Foot of Fine; Q: Hen Stanmore. D: Mary Brograve. 1 mess, 8a land, 16a mead, 20a past, 6a wood called Longs in Beckenham. £60. (Kent Arch). Possibly a messuage which had been leased by the Brograves being taken back in hand.

1552 - Foot of Fine; Q: Ric Wigmore, mercer of London. D: Jn Brograve. Manor of Kelsellys with 4 mess, 23a mead, 155a past, 160a wood in Beckenham. 1000 marks. (Kent Arch)

http://www.oxford-shakespeare.com/Probate/PROB_11-32-83.pdf

1552/1557  date to be confirmed Sir Edmund Style inherits Langley from his father Sir Humphrey Style

1553 - Queen Mary I until 1558

1553 - Foot of Fine;  Q: Hen Brograve. D: Jn Brograve, gent. Manor of Kelsys with 6 mess, 400a land, 100a mead, 200a past, 300a wood in Beckenham & Hayes. £600.

1555 - Querant: Thos Acworth, cit & merchant taylour of London. Deforciant: Wm  Vaus, esq (son & heir apparent of Thos Vaus, Ld Harrowden.) Manor of Foxgrove with 20 mess, 500a land, 60a mead, 200a past, 300a wood, 500a waste in Beckenham, Lewisham & Bromley. £280.(Kent Arch.)

The description of 20 messuages illustrates that Foxgrove accommodated several smallholdings and contradicts the later descriptions of Foxgrove being just one entity.

1555 - Foot of Fine; Q: Wm Curtes, Jn Skelton. D: Thos Whyte & wife Sibyll. 2 cottages & 2 gdns in Beckenham. £20. (Kent Arch)

1556 - Approximate date of birth of John Dalston (1556-1609) of Cumberland who by marrying a Tyrell heiress will acquire one moiety of Beckenham Manor. Dalston is mentioned on the map of 1623 along with Henry Snelgrave (Snelgar).

1557 - Beckenham (High Street) and Bromley; 

Swane (John), of the town of Bromley, co. Kent, draper.—To be buried in the parish church of S. Peter, Bromley. To John his eldest son his mansion house and tenements in the parish of S. Mary Abohuroh(Abchurch) in S. Laurence Pownteney'Lane, and his leasehold farm called "Shorams" in the parish of Beckenam, co. Kent, in tail; remainder to Edith and Agnes his daughters. To Anne his wife his house at Bromley called "the taberde" for life, with similar remainder; and a field called "Barnet." Bequests to his daughters' children, his servants, and others. Dated 13 February, A.D. 1557.
Roll 251 (166).

Monday next before the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.]

Calendar of Wills Proved and Enrolled in the Court of Husting, London: Part 2, 1358-1688.


1567 - Beckenham Manor, 1 moiety; Robert Leigh the elder dies and buried at St.George's.

1570 - Manor of Beckenham; under Elizabeth  I  A Petition of John Johnson to Sir Wm. Cecill. Requests that examination be made of a lease, by which one-half of the lordship of Beckenham, Kent, the property of one Tyrrell, a ward, is demised to Robert Ligh (Leigh), by Humphrey Tyrrel and Jane his wife. (BTO)

Robert Ligh (Legh/Leigh) had acquired the other moietie of Beckenham Manor from Clement Harleston and is leasing the other moiety from Tyrell. The Tyrell moiety will revert to Tyrells and descend to Dalston and Curwen via family intermarriages.

1583 - Beckenham Manor;  Nicholas Leigh dies and leaves a will although no record of his burial is at Beckenham indicating he may have resided or died elsewhere.

1589 - circa; Sir John Dalston of Cumberland marries Ann (Catherine) Tyrrel or Tirrel, daughter of Thomas Tirrel (source: History of Parliament) However, current research is indicating that the wife's name was Ann. In any case this was Dalston's second marriage  at the age of about 33. The couple had two daughters, one of whom married Henry Curwen.

1590 - The Will of Izarde Curtis or Curtys of Beckenham, widow of William Curtys, is reported as recording " my house and lande within the pische of Lewisham called Stumpeshill" (source: R.Reed) 'pische' is an alternative spelling or abbreviation of parish. Whether this refers to property on the site of Beckenham Place is speculative but may be supported by indications of buildings on Rocque's map of 1745. At present it is the earliest written indication we have for buildings on or near the site. Frustratingly, wills and property deeds often lack any map or detail to allow for identification of land.

1596 - Penge: There seem to have been several tenants of the manor at Penge in 1596, (source: H.E.Malden, A History of the County of Surrey, 1912)
An extract: The 'hamlet' of Penge was part of the ancient ecclesiastical parish of Battersea. The curious anomalies of its local government led to its formation as a separate urban district and its transfer to the county of Kent in 1900. (fn. 49) Penge was a wooded district, over which the tenants of Battersea Manor had common of pasture. (fn. 50) The boundaries of the hamlet on the north in February 1604–5 were the common of Rockhills (evidently Rockhills in Upper Sydenham, immediately north of the Crystal Palace) and the 'Shire Ditch' leading past the house called 'Abbetts' to the north corner of 'Lord Riden's Wood.' The Shire Ditch also bounded the hamlet on the east and was crossed by 'Willmoores Bridge,' half in Kent and half in Surrey. On the south it was bounded by the waste or common of Croydon, the green way from Croydon to Lewisham. On the west was a wood 'of Mr. Colton's' in Camberwell parish, which stretched from Vicker's Oak to the Low Cross near Rockhills. (fn. 51) There seem to have been several tenants of the manor at Penge in 1596, (fn. 52) but in 1725 the vicar of Battersea returned to Bishop Willis that there were only thirteen houses and sixty inhabitants in Penge, who went to Beckenham Church, and for whose care he paid a trifling consideration to the incumbent of Beckenham. (fn. 53) The whole common was inclosed under an Act of 1827. (fn. 54) There were then 320 acres already inclosed and several houses standing there. In 1853 Mr. Schuster sold his park on the summit of Penge Hill to the Crystal Palace Company for the re-erection of the gigantic building made by Sir Joseph Paxton for the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. (fn. 55) The Palace was opened by Queen Victoria in 1854. (fn. 56) In 1877, owing to financial difficulties and to the 'Greenwich fair characteristics,' which had replaced the former educational objects of the Palace, the company was reconstituted. (fn. 57) The Palace, as originally planned, was the exhibition building of glass and iron which had served for the Exhibition of 1851 in Hyde Park, re-erected on this site, with the addition of high water towers to supply the fountains in the grounds. Inside courts were erected to illustrate the arts and architecture of different periods, from the Egyptian monarchy to the Italian Renaissance, and there was a great collection of plaster casts of famous statues. (fn. 58) A School of Art and Music was established, and later a School of Forestry and Engineering, which has continued to flourish. The Palace became the chief seat of the highest class of music near London, and the Handel Festivals, under the direction of Sir Michael Costa and Sir August Manns, obtained the greatest reputation, as did the Saturday Concerts so closely associated with the names of Sir August Manns and Sir George Grove. But the public taste did not rise to this level, and the theatre and music-hall exhibitions gradually eclipsed the educational features. The grounds, of great extent, including a cricket field, football ground and a lake, continue to furnish unrivalled scope for exhibitions, excursions, games and firework or aeronautical displays. The land surrounding the Palace was sold shortly before 1875 for building purposes, and the whole site is now for sale.

1600 - Beckenham Manor (part of) to Bradbury, from which Family about the latter End of Q. Eliz.(1600) it came over by Sale to Serjeant Gent, who gave it in Dower with his Daughter to Sir George Dalston of Cumberland, who in our Memory (1630-?) conveyed it to Sir Patrick Curwin of the same County, who later sold it to Oliver St. John (1635) (source; Philipot)

We are finding that the accounts of Philipot and Hasted treat the descent of Beckenham manor perhaps too briefly and with missed elements. However, the issue is complicated and has confused several writers. Although Bradbury was involved with the Tyrells this part of the Manor came by a daughter, Ann of the Tyrells who married Sir John Dalston and thereby via a Dalston daughter to Henry Curwen who married Catherine Dalston and it descended to their son Patricius who sold it to Sir Oliver St. John circa 1638 (source; K.Baldwin research)

1603 - King James I (VI of Scotland) until 1625


1604 - Penge:
The boundaries of the hamlet on the north in February 1604–5 were the common of Rockhills (evidently Rockhills in Upper Sydenham, immediately north of the Crystal Palace) and the 'Shire Ditch' leading past the house called 'Abbetts' (see Manor of Beckenham 1623 and 1768) to the north corner of 'Lord Riden's Wood.' The Shire Ditch also bounded the hamlet on the east and was crossed by 'Willmoores Bridge,' half in Kent and half in Surrey. On the south it was bounded by the waste or common of Croydon, the green way from Croydon to Lewisham. On the west was a wood 'of Mr. Colton's' in Camberwell parish, which stretched from Vicker's Oak to the Low Cross near Rockhills. (source: H.E.Malden)

Malden's History of Surrey from 1912 probably quotes Lyson's work. Abbetts or Abbotts and Lord Riden's Wood are described on the 1768 Manor of Beckenham map copied from 1623. Willmoores Bridge is shown on the  Burrell estates map of 1723/35

1610 - Beckenham Manor: Robert Legh (Leigh), Esq., whose descendant of the same name, in 1610, aliened it to Henry Snelgar, or Snelgrave, Esq. (Lysons)

Several chroniclers relate that this Robert Leigh who is grandson of the purchaser of Beckenham Manor sells it to Henry Snelgrave, later Sir Henry, but documentary evidence apart from the 1623 map has not been discovered. Other documents about this time record some of the Leigh family property dealings.


1613 – Several early maps of Kent are on record showing Beckenham identified by a church or manor house but the only other detail is Langley placed between Beckenham and West Wickham.




From John Speed’s map 1614

1617 - William Style (1560-1624) inherits Langley from his father Sir Edmund Style (1538-1617)

1619 -
A Court of Chancery record, Dalston and Snelgar/Snelgrove each had half of Beckenham Manor and the 1623 map legend stating "as yet undivided" seems to imply that no agreed division exists. Short title: Snelgar v Dalston.Plaintiffs: Sir Henry Snelgar kt. Defendants: Sir John Dalston kt and others.ubject: moiety of the manor of Beckenham, Kent. Document type: bill, two answers.

1620-25 Beckenham Manor part of, Philipot and  Hasted describe a successor of John Leigh alienated it to Sir Henry Snelgrave, from whom it descended to his grandson (1639), but Lysons places it in 1610.

1623 - A Plan of the Manor of Beckenham lands is drawn by Nicholas Lane showing they are divided between Sir Henry Snellyer (Snelgrave) of Beckenham and Sir John Dolston (Dalston) of Cumberland. According to Philipott and later Hasted the manor was earlier inherited by two Bruyn daughters and divided into two parts or moieties between them and their relevant husbands. After a few generations the Manor became rejoined into one under the St.John family circa 1635-50. The timeline will have any details. This image from the plan (below) is the main part of Beckenham Manor, north is toward the bottom right hand corner. The legend explaining the division, written in 1623 and transcribed by T. Proudlove in 1768. The original map has not been discovered but this is from the later redrawn version.

From Philipot: "Robert Leigh descended out of Cheshire, whose Successor about the latter End of King James (1620-25) alienated it to Sir Henry Snelgrave, from whom it descended to his Grandchild Mr. Henry Snelgrave, (in 1639) ". Snelgrave must be in possession by 1623 according to the map legend and is described as buying from Leigh in 1610 by Lysons.

Matching the plan against the Foxgrove Manor plan and more modern maps also shows that very little Beckenham Manor land is in Beckenham Place Park. It would seem that only the edge of Stumps Hill Wood was in Beckenham Manor. The land to the left of the outlined section marked Sir Francis Leigh is part of Foxgrove Manor which becomes Beckenham Place. The Church and old Manor House are marked. Other parts of the map show the outlying fields and Abbey Farm at Penge Common, the latter is now partially enclosed within Crystal Palace Park.

Courtesy of the British Library © a section of the map excluding parts near Penge, Crystal Palace, Kelsey and Langley

Transcript of the map legend:

The Plot of the Manor of Beckenham with the Demesne Lands Woods Pastures Meadows and Brooks unto the same pertaining now used and belonging situate lying & being in the said Parish of Beckenham In the County of Kent. And is now the Manor Land etc. of Two Men as yet un-divided (that is to say?) Henry Snellyer (aka Snelgrave) of the Parish of Beckenham aforesaid his own part or Moiety. And Sir John Dolston (sic Dalston?) of the Parish of Dolston in the County of Cumberland Kt. the other part or Moiety As... is inscribed and plotted one Tenement or Farm and the Land unto the same belonging being also in the said Parish of Beckenham called the Abbey and is coloured about in Yellow. Being the said S. Henry’s own tenement and Land and now Leased out unto Richard Baldwyn of the same Yeo. All which said Manor and Tenement and the said several Lands etc. were at the Request of the said Sir Henry Snellyer. Measured and Plotted in the month of November in the year 1623. By Nicholas Lane. Supervisor.

T. Proudlove. TransferiRfit. 1768

Courtesy of the British Library shelf ref Maps 188.k.3.

Above; The Abbey Farm lands leased to Richard Baldwin. It would be interesting to learn where Henry Snellyer/Snelgrave is residing but the disparate parts of Beckenham Manor allow for several possibilities. The parish records for St.George's have several burials for Baldwins from the 16th century onwards but none that would fit this Richard Baldwin although probably his father and grandfather of the same name appear on the burial register

The acreages of the two parts and the part identified as leased.

Sir John Dalston is traceable as MP for Cumberland who soon after sold or transferred his part to Patricius Curwen, also MP for Cumberland.
Both on History of Parliament online. The name Snellyer seems to be interchangeable or aliased with Snelgrave and Snelgar.

This link for Patrick or Patricius Curwen at History of Parliament explains Curwens relationship with the Dalstons through marriage and his business activities. This added to the footnote below from Lyson's increases the likelihood of an interfamily transfer or maybe a marriage settlement. Whether Dalston or Curwen used Beckenham as a residence while attending Parliament remains a question. https://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1604-1629/member/curwen-patricius-1602-1664

A footnote in Lyson's Environs of London states: The alliances of the Tyrrells, Dalstons, and Curwens are taken from St. George's Visitation of Cumberland, in the College of Arms. The alienation from Sir George Dalston, (who was son of Sir John Dalston by a second wife,) to Sir Patrick Curwen, as mentioned by Philipott and Hasted, was, it is probable, a family conveyance. He might have been trustee for Sir Patrick, who was his nephew. The conveyance of this moiety of the manor, from Humphrey Tyrrell to Sir Ralph Warren, mentioned by Philipott, and confirmed by Pat. 35 Hen. VIII. pt. 18. April 12, was probably a mortgage, or trust, though not declared; as was also, I suppose, a conveyance from the same Humphrey Tyrrell to William Parker, citizen and draper. Pat. 2 Edw. VI. pt. 1. Nov.

1623 - Beckenham Church is under Rochester Diocese covering this dispute over a private pew. Contemporary with the drawing of the map of Beckenham Manor and perhaps part of the process of formalizing the 'assets' which went with each moiety of the manor.

DIOCESE OF CHICHESTER: EPISCOPAL RECORDS.THE ARCHDEACONRY OF LEWES Formulary. , 1623. Second copy. Ff.524-529 Sir John Dalston and Sir Henry Snelgar of Rochester diocese v. John Brograve and Margaret his wife of Beckenham. Sentence in cause for a pew. N.D. Sir William Byrd, LL.D.

Held by:West Sussex Record Office
Date: unknown

Reference: Ep/II/29/1


1624 - This relates to several properties in Beckenham and elsewhere including Langley, Kent House, Clayhersts(Clayhill or possibly Woolseys Farm?) and Simpsons Place or  Farm in Bromley. The Bosvilles and Pershalls had possession or occupancy of Simpsons Place. A loan between the families resulted in a later court of Chancery case whereby the Style family claimed repossession of Simpsons Place, see 1668/70. Whatever the rights and wrongs of the case Simpsons and other property as part of the Styles Langley estates was passed to the Elwills via marriage to a Style heiress and the Elwills sold Langley including Simpsons to Hugh Raymond in 1732.

Hull History Centre: Papers of the Bosville-Macdonald Family

U DDBM/36/3 Marriage Settlement: William Stile(Style) senr. of Bromlye esq., to his son and heir Sir Humphrey Stile, Sir John Peshall of Sogonhill, co. Staffs., Dame Elizabeth Boswell widow of Sir Robert Bosvile, Thomas Stile of Watringberrie esq. and Edmond Stile of Beckenham gent., (brother of W. S. senior): prior to marriage of Sir H. S. and Dame E. B. Messuages and lands in Beckenham, Lewsham, Langlye Greene, Wickham and Deptford, co. Kent; and in Batrichsey, co. Surrey (Tenants and rents specified. Mentions capital messuage called Langley, messuage called Kent House and lands called the Parkes, Tomshill, Southfield, Rudlies and Croftes, Dawes Grove, Gravely Croft, the Newe Orchard, Gilbertes, Gilbertes Brooke, Henly Grove, Feildes, Great and Little Toms Woodfeild, Bruehouse Field, the Wildes, Willmottes, Clayhersts, Tenn Acres, the Hopyard, the Ozier Yard, Wickersland Meade in Beckenham, Birchgrove in Wickham. Jenkyns and Issabell Field in Lessham). Witn. Stephen Scott, Robert Style, Ra. Massie, Richard Harvye, John Fryer, Edmund Savage. Endorsed with attornment of 34 tenants (26 April 1624) 1 item 9 Apr 1624

U DDBM/36/11 Settlement (i) Sir Henry Bosvile of Eynsford, Robert Brent of Grayes Inn esq., Benjamin Green citizen and haberdasher of London and Edward Browne of Cliffords Inn, gent. (ii) Richard and Bridgett Bosvile younger children of Richard Bosvile of Bionnie, co. Staffs., esq. (iii) Robert Bosvileesq. (son and heir of the said Richard B. dec'd) and Elizabeth Martin widow of William Martin of the Middle Temple, gent., dec'd Capital messuage called Simpsons Place in Bromley with all appurtenances and 400 acres of woods in Beckenham, Bromley, Hayes, Lewsham, Orpington and Keiston: Witn. E. Simanans, Paul Pullein 1 item 24 Jun 1673

U DDBM/34/12 Covenant to levy a fine (i) William Martyn of Middle Temple, London, gent., and wife Elizabeth, widow and admin. of Richard Bosvile of Bionnie, co. of Staffs. esq. (ii) John Byrch of Cannocke, co. Staffs., gent. and Walter Higges of Stafford, gent. (iii) Sir Richard Oteley of Pitchford co. Salop and Sir Henry Bosvile of Eynsford co. Kent and Robert Bosvileesq., (as (i)) Capital messuage called Sympsons place in Bromeley; 400 acres woodland in pars (parishes of). Beckenham, Bromeley, Hayes, Lewsham, Orpington and Keiston all in the co. Kent: To uses declared in indenture of previous dated. Witn. Geo. Gyford, Rob. Brent, John Evens 1 item


1624 - Langley passes from William Style (1560-1624) to Humphrey Style (1585-1660) who dies without issue so his half
brother William inherits in 1660

1625 - King Charles I until 1649

1626 - Oct. 10. Calendar of State Papers Domestic; Scadbury. 63. Dep. Lieuts. of Kent to the Council. Sir Henry Snelgar is charged with arms in that county.

Sir Henry Snelgar(Snelgrave) of Beckenham Manor in his capacity as Magistrate. The full meaning of  "charged with arms" is not known, it may mean supplied with for a militia. The usual unrest may exist between England and France as this is around the time of the persecution of the Huguenots. In this year on May 6th Dutch colonist Peter Minuit organizes the purchase of Manhattan Island from Native Americans for 60 Guilders worth of goods. Believed to have been Canarsee Indians of the Lenape.


1627 - Langley; William Style acquires a licence under Charles I to empark any part of his lands in Bromley, Beckenham, West Wickham and Hayes. (October) source: BHO

1633 - Humphrey Style writes a letter to his wife or someone close about arranging a procession. Whether the Snelgar is Henry Snelgrove of Beckenham Manor is in question. Some curiosity must be expressed regarding Court cases in Chancery between Style and Snelgar (Snelgrave):

Sir Humphrey Style 1633.(original spellings) from Robert Borrowman's "Beckenham Past and Present"

Dear Harte, I have had, since I parted with thee, three fits of an agewe, wich hath troubled mee very sorely,but I thank God I have nowe quite lost yt, and begun to be very well. Monsieur de Soubise kisseth your hand, and Desired me to write you word you must not be angry with him for keeping mee beyond my apointed time. Newes wee have none heere, but of horses and dogs. I hope that thou hast lost they could by this time. I shall not be in London till the 4th of March wch will be Shrove Mondeye, therefore I would entreate thee, the Satturdie before to goe out of towne to my ladie Prescot’s house. I would have thee stay till the Sises bee ended: then I will come and fetch you theare. Take all the men with you but Snelgar, who must help mee to my clothes.

Leave Lucres and marie to look to the house in London. Pennefather I would have goe down to Langleye, that he may help to look to the Parke in the absence of Moseley. I would have all my menne to meete mee on Shrove Tuesday, by 10 of the clock in the morning, at the Bull in Dartford for at that time, God willing, I intend to be theere, and from thence to Rochester that night, to meete the Hie Sherife. French and Oxenbridge, as I remember Sir Thomas Stile did desier, should be without fayle on Ash Wensdaye morning by eight of the clock, at Westram, to meet the Under Sherif, to come along with the Judge that cometh out of Surreye. Pray bid Snelgar to buie mee 6 javelins, wheere Sir Thomas hath bespoke his, and that he paye for them two shillings a piece: allso that he call to Mr Wood the haberdasher for the hats and feathers, also the bridles and saddles; and that the groom have order to fit all the saddles and bridle to everie horse, and that all the horses be well dressed, fed and trimmed. I would have the white gelding for Snelar to ride on, Ashfield for Barlow , the great bay mare for William Bennet, and the black nag bought of Charles for the grooome; Moseley on his own horse, the cook upon crop and Harnie’s horse for mr Lovekin, for he hath lent mee his horse for his own boy to ride on. My little black nagg, Terringham, I would have sadelled with my crimson velvet pad, and that the groome be sure that I have newe stirrops, stirrop leathers, bridle and girts, and that nothing be amiss. I would have the groome with all the rest of my men, Snelgar and the boye who shall come along with mee from London, to bee up very early upon Shrove Tewesdaye in the morning, that theye may coom softly with the horses to Dartford, and that they lead with them my black nag Terringam, the white gelding for Snelgar, Harnies’s horse for Mr. Lovekin, who shall likewise coom downe with mee from London; so they shall meete their horses at Dartford. The foot man I would have coom alonge with them, because I would have his clothes handsome. If Sir John Prescot will not goe to the assizes, which I hope he will, then i desire his gelding may be b16rought along to Dartford, for my wife to ride on, then one of my men shall ride on my black nag, and I wold have Crop left at home because he is very poor and ilfavoured.

1636 - Showing that Sir Henry Snelgrave of Beckenham Manor was a JP for Kent; (BHO)

Oct. 20.
Deptford.22. Sir Henry Palmer to Sir Henry Snelgrave, Justice of Peace of Kent.

The west part of that county being charged with carriage of timber for his Majesty's service, the writer prays that a speedy course may be taken therein. [The same seal as No. 18. ½ p.] Underwritten,

22. i. Sir Henry Snelgrave to Sir Henry Palmer. Sent the Council's letter to Sir Thomas Walsingham, deputylieutenant, as is usual. [¼ p.]

22. ii. Certificate of Sir Thomas Walsingham that, finding the latter concerned the west part of Kent, he sent it to the Quarter Sessions at Maidstone, where an order was given for the Clerk of the Peace to answer the same to the Council. [¼ p.]


Also in 1636 letters to Sir Henry and others speak of the concern of contagion being carried by persons travelling to and from London. Plague and other diseases such as smallpox are recorded in the diaries of John Evelyn. The plague would have regular outbreaks though not as great as 1665. Justices of the Peace including Sir Henry Snelgrave are charged with preventing to and  from London especially where it might carry infection to royal residences. (source BHO Calendar of State Papers Charles I)


Sept. 18.
Oatlands.
61. The Council to the Justices of Peace, co. Middlesex. The selling of rags in this time of infection being a great cause of dispersing the plague in the country near London, and there being no means to suppress such dealing whilst the paper mills in Middlesex are suffered to work, his Majesty had commanded the writers to give directions that no paper mills within that county be permitted to go or work until it shall please God to remove the contagion. The justices are required not only to stay the working of all such mills, but to suppress the buying of any rags or old clothes, and if any refuse to obey, they are to commit them till they be brought to a better understanding. [Draft. ½ p.]

Sept. 18.
Oatlands.
62. The same to the Justices of Peace for Surrey near Nonsuch and Oatlands. By letters of 11th June the Lords gave them charge to inquire what houses within ten miles of Hampton Court and Oatlands received inmates or sojourners and to take order for the present removing of them. The Lords are given to understand that divers Londoners have obtained houses, not only near Hampton Court and Oatlands, but near Nonsuch also, and there inhabit, going daily to and from London, which cannot be without great peril to their Majesties. The justices were charged not only to perform the former letter, but also to remove such persons as coming from London or Westminster have settled as aforesaid. Persons who settled before the said letters are to be enjoined that they neither go nor suffer their servants to pass to and from London, upon pain to be removed from their houses or to have the same shut up. [Draft. 1¼ p.]

79. The same to Sir Thomas Walsingham, Sir Henry Snelgrave, and Thomas Blunt. Letter similar to that addressed on the 18th instant, to the Justices of Peace of Surrey [see No. 62] but having relation to Greenwich "the site of one of his Majesty's standing houses." [Draft. 1 p.]

1638/39 (at the latest) - Patricius or Patrick Curwen, MP for Cumberland sold his Interest in Beckenham Manor (1 moiety) to Sir Oliver St. John of Batricksey (Battersea) in Surrey, who upon his Decease 1639 gave it to his Son John who died young in 1657. Then to Mr. Walter, but  upon the Death of his Nephew 1657, Sir Walter St. John Baronet, (Oliver St. John had one son named John who left property and the title to his uncle Walter St. John.). However a 'calendar of docquets' dates a license to alienate this moiety of the Manor of Beckenham to 1639 and to other parties than Oliver St. John although those parties may have been acting for St.John. Oliver St.John died in 1639 so this transaction had to take place at this time at the latest.

Patrick Curwen may have decided to sell after the death of his only son Henry in 1636 and then having no direct heir.

The  passage of Curwen and prior to him Dalston through the Manor of Beckenham could be imagined to relate to thier office as MP's for Cumberland but family intermarriages brought about the succession of ownership from the Tyrells down through Dalston to Curwen. Sir John Dalston was succeeded by his grandson George Dalston as MP. and  it appears that Patricius Curwen and George Dalston as Royalist MPs were part of the number of MP's prevented from sitting in the Long Parliament giving rise to the Rump Parliament of 1648.  Lyson's adds a footnote: "The alliances of the Tyrrells, Dalstons, and Curwens are taken from St. George's Visitation of Cumberland, in the College of Arms. The alienation from Sir George Dalston, (who was son of Sir John Dalston by a second wife,) to Sir Patrick Curwen, as mentioned by Philipott and Hasted, was, it is probable, a family conveyance. He might have been trustee for Sir Patrick, who was his nephew. The conveyance of this moiety of the manor, from Humphrey Tyrrell to Sir Ralph Warren, mentioned by Philipott, and confirmed by Pat. 35 Hen. VIII. pt. 18. April 12, was probably a mortgage, or trust, though not declared; as was also, I suppose, a conveyance from the same Humphrey Tyrrell to William Parker, citizen and draper. Pat. 2 Edw. VI. pt. 1. Nov." This adds to the complexity of ownership but illustrates the potential financial dealings via mortgages and that family connections were involved in the transfers.The matter might be further complicated by the upcoming civil war as Curwen enlisted as a colonel in the Royalist army. The other documents may reveal that other parties were involved in the disposal of this part of Curwen's estate.

1638/39 - Beckenham Manor (one part); Sir Henry Snelgrave is buried in St. George's Beckenham  leaving this part to Mr. Henry Snelgrave his grandson. Although his will asks for him to be buried near his wife at St. Georges the burial records do not show him but do show his wife and several children but as our source is a transcription then  errors may  exist. His will mentions substantial lands in Beckenham, Surrey and Hampshire. I am led to wonder if his acquisition of part of Beckenham Manor had anything to do with his appointment as Justice of the Peace for West Kent.

From Philipott: Robert Leigh descended out of Cheshire, whose Successor about the latter End of King James (1620-25) alienated it to Sir Henry Snelgrave, from whom it descended to his Grandchild Mr. Henry Snelgrave, who not long since passed it away to Mr. Walter, now Sir Walter St. John Baronet, who lately hath exchanged the whole Mannor, for other Land with his Brother Mr. Henry St. John."

We can clarify that as Snelgrave and Dalston had the 1623 map drawn up which might be taken as a 'latest' date at which Snelgrave bought his part of Beckenham Manor. We also find this latter description has missed some detail as records in Surrey archive reveal that Mr Henry Snelgrave, the grandson, sold or mortgaged it to the Evelyn brothers, Richard, George and John the diarist of Deptford in 1648 who in turn sold it to Walter and Henry St. John in 1650, see 1648 and 1650.

The burial records for the Snelgraves show that some members died very close to one another ie one child dying at a date close to the mother and one son dying at a date close to the father's death. Whether this indicates visitations of disease or coincidence we cannot say.


1640 - Humphrey Style of Langley sues for libel against Shaw. source: https://www.british-history.ac.uk/no-series/court-of-chivalry/632-style-shaw

1642-1651 English Civil War - the impact of the war will have influenced some sales  of properties as several families sought exile for either political or religious reasons. Similarly families who stayed put survived the turmoil.

1642 - Connection with Beckenham Manor; Richard Hubert, knight, executor of Thomas Wroughton, armiger v.Thomas Snelgrave, armiger, son and heir apparent of Henry Snelgrave de Beckenham, Kent, Debt on an obligation: £600; undefended; (50s damages) (Trinity Term, 1655, fully satisfied.

This reference may indicate some financial problems for the Snelgraves perhaps influencing their sale of their part of Beckenham Manor. The turmoil of the Civil War may be a reason. Thomas's financial troubles may have been a reason for Sir Henry Snelgrave to pass over his son Thomas and leave his part of Beckenham Manor to his grandson, Henry in 1639. The term armiger describes someone able to bear arms or having a coat of arms. At the outset of the civil war maybe this indicates a military position. As the son of a baronet Thomas is likely to have been a Royalist. 

1644 - Thayer's Farm; May 1644; gleaned from web searches; There were several generations of Thayers and this piece illustrates the kind of problems they  had to deal with. He is described as a poor farmer. We cannot say whether they owned the farm or leased it from a larger landowner but the  Thayers appear to have given up the farm in the early 18th Century, see 1736. Dr Skynner, the rector had been seperated from his occupancy of the parish church presumably by the Puritan movement during the Civil War.

A site called Connected Histories has an entry from May 1644 "17. 133. Petition of Giles Theyer to the Committees for the Parliament. That he being possessor of a team in Beckenham was obliged to disburse 5 l . 3 s . 4 d . to redeem his team of horses,
"The full story from Mocavo....

May 17. 133. Petition of Giles Theyer to the Committees for the Parliament. That he being possessor of a team in Beckenham
was obliged to disburse 51. 3s. 4d. to redeem his team of horses,they being seized for non-payment of the l0d. tax levied on that
parish; the deficiency was caused by inability to collect the sum assessed on Dr. Skynner, late rector of that parish, who was then
under sequestration. Older having been passed by the Committee that money disbursed for taxes unpaid of lands in sequestration shall
be allowed out of the rents from the tenants, or upon account by theTreasurer of Sequestrations. Petitioner being a poor man prays
that order may be taken for repayment to him of the said sum,which he cannot afford to lose. Underwritten,
133. I. Ordered that Daniel Shetterden shall repay the money advanced by Giles Theyer. Dorso,
133. II. Receipt by Giles Theyer for 51. 3s. 4d. received of DanielShetterden. 18th May 1644.
133. III. Ordered, that as the above-named sum was omitted to be allowed to Mr. Shetterden upon the passing of his former
sequestration accounts, the same be allowed to him out of such sequestration money as is now in his hands.


1644 - Foxgrove: LEIGH, Sir Francis II (1590-1644), of Addington, Surrey. and East Wickham, Kent dies. He is the Sir Francis Leigh identified as holding Foxgrove Manor by Thomas Philipott (see 1659 below) also see History of Parliament online. And he is the Francis Leigh indicated on the Beckenham Manor map because when Proudlove copied the map he did not update the Foxgrove landlord/s for 1768. A little confusing as the last Leigh to hold Foxgrove is also named Sir Francis who dies in 1711. It appears that Thomas Leigh holds Foxgrove from 1644 until 1665

1647 - St. George's Beckenham; John Storer was a clergyman of the Church of England, who matriculated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1633, took his B.A. degree in 1637 and M.A.in 1640. He was curate at Doddinghurst, Essex, 13th October, 1637, Lecturer at St. Giles, Cripplegate, 18th March, 1641–2, vicar of Barking, 5th March, 1646/7, and Rector of Beckenham, Kent, 19th October, 1647. He married on 1st January, 1644–5, Joanna, daughter of John Christmas. Four of his children were baptised at Beckenham, viz. John in 1651, Elizabeth in 1653 and another Elizabeth, and Peter, on 3rd November, 1657. Calamy says that during his eleven years' stay at Beckenham he was well beloved though he sometimes met with rudeness from such persons as despised the ministerial office. (source BHO, Survey of London)

1648 – Surrey Heritage record: Receipt from Henry Snelgrave of Beckenham , Kent, to John Evelyn of the Middle Temple for £2250, the consideration money in a bargain and sale of 13 Jul between Snelgrave and John, George and Richard Evelyn.Witnessed by Robert Abbott, scrivener, his servant Robert Cleton [Clayton] and Thomas Snelgrave. Endorsed as being a mortgage of the Manor of Beckenham for three years. With note by William Bray about Abbott and Clayton. [HMC p.678a].


John Evelyn is the famous diarist of Sayes Court Deptford. We might assume that the subsequent sale to the St. Johns would be that Snelgrave decided to sell or not repay the mortgage. This may make me re-assess the records about the ownership and rejoining of Beckenham Manor in that Oliver St. John bought one part about 1635 and his brothers Walter and Henry bought the other part in 1651. Whether the Evelyns are doing a quick trade of the Beckenham Manor is to be confirmed but that was the outcome. Evelyn's diary records his purchase and sales of some other properties during his lifetime. In fact he mentions buying the Manor of Wurcott from his brother in 1648 and selling it later the same year as well as visiting other properties. Here is an excerpt from his diary for this period in 1648;

26th April, 1648. There was a great uproar in London, that the rebel army quartering at Whitehall, would plunder the City, on which there was published a Proclamation for all to stand on their guard.

4th May, 1648. Came up the Essex petitioners for an agreement between his Majesty and the rebels. The 16th, the Surrey men addressed the Parliament for the same; of which some of them were slain and murdered by Cromwell's guards, in the new palace yard. I now sold the impropriation of South Malling, near Lewes, in Sussex, to Messrs. Kemp and Alcock, for £3,000.

30th May, 1648. There was a rising now in Kent, my Lord of Norwich being at the head of them. Their first rendezvous was in Broome-field, next my house at Sayes Court, whence they went to Maidstone, and so to Colchester, where was that memorable siege.

27th June, 1648. I purchased the manor of Hurcott, in Worcestershire, of my brother George, for £3,300.

1st July, 1648. I sate for my picture, in which there is a Death's head, to Mr. Walker, that excellent painter.

10th July, 1648. News was brought me of my Lord Francis Villiers being slain by the rebels near Kingston.

16th August, 1648. I went to Woodcote (in Epsom) to the wedding of my brother, Richard, who married the daughter and coheir of Esquire Minn, lately deceased; by which he had a great estate both in land and money on the death of a brother. The coach in which the bride and bridegroom were, was overturned in coming home; but no harm was done.

28th August, 1648. To London from Sayes Court, and saw the celebrated follies of Bartholomew Fair.

Strange how the disruption of the impending Civil War was interspersed with "follies" and Evelyn describes another property transaction for Hurcott.

1649 - 30th January; Charles I beheaded at Whitehall

1650 - End of the English Civil War

1651 – 21st June; Beckenham Manor, Snelgraves part.  Surrey Archive: Confirmation of bargain and sale (in return for purchase money) 1) John Evelyn of Middle Temple, George Evelyn of Wotton and Richard Evelyn of Baynards, esqs 2) Walter and Henry St John of Battersea, esqs. Moiety of manor of Beckenham, Kent, and of advowson; also manor house and certain named fields.[This may be a stray record from the Evelyn archives introduced by William Bray]. https://www.surreyarchives.org.uk/collections/getrecord/SHCOL_LM_SectionG_10_9_4_1
The Evelyns were active in the buying and selling of properties, some are referred to in John Evelyns diary. Here follows a passage from Evelyn's diary though he is absent from England having gone to France and Italy along with several  other personalities, presumably all royalist avoiding the Civil War while pursuing a kind of 'grand tour'. I assume one of Evelyn's brothers complete the sale of Beckenham Manor to the St.Johns:

25th May, 1651. I went to visit Mr. Thomas White, a learned priest and famous philosopher, author of the book "De Mundo," with whose worthy brother I was well[Pg 263] acquainted at Rome. I was shown a cabinet of Maroquin, or Turkey leather, so curiously inlaid with other leather, and gilding, that the workman demanded for it 800 livres.

The Dean (of Peterborough) preached on the feast of Pentecost, perstringing those of Geneva for their irreverence of the Blessed Virgin.

4th June, 1651. Trinity Sunday, I was absent from church in the afternoon on a charitable affair for the Abbess of Bourcharvant, who but for me had been abused by that chemist, Du Menie. Returning, I stepped into the Grand Jesuits, who had this high day exposed their Cibarium, made all of solid gold and imagery, a piece of infinite cost. Dr. Croydon, coming out of Italy and from Padua, came to see me, on his return to England.

5th June, 1651. I accompanied my Lord Strafford, and some other noble persons, to hear Madam Lavaran sing, which she did both in French and Italian excellently well, but her voice was not strong.

7th June, 1651. Corpus Christi Day, there was a grand procession, all the streets tapestried, several altars erected there, full of images, and other rich furniture, especially that before the Court, of a rare design and architecture. There were abundance of excellent pictures and great vases of silver.

13th June, 1651. I went to see the collection of one Monsieur Poignant, which for variety of agates, crystals, onyxes, porcelain, medals, statues, relievos, paintings, taille-douces, and antiquities, might compare with the Italian virtuosos.

21st June, 1651. I became acquainted with Sieur William Curtius, a very learned and judicious person of the Palatinate. He had been a scholar to Alstedius, the Encyclopedist, was well advanced in years, and now Resident for his Majesty at Frankfort.

2d July, 1651. Came to see me the Earl of Strafford, Lord Ossory and his brother, Sir John Southcott, Sir Edward Stawell, two of my Lord Spencer's sons, and Dr. Stewart, Dean of St. Paul's, a learned and pious man, where we entertained the time upon several subjects, especially the affairs of England, and the lamentable condition of our Church. The Lord Gerrard also called to see my collection of sieges and battles.

Again, it is strange how such matters as property exchanges take place so near to Civil War. Evelyn was an ardent supporter of the Church of England which was subject to the Puritan changes brought about by Cromwell. These exiled people carried on their lives abroad. While Evelyn was residing at Sayes Court, Deptford he made several visits to the Bishop of Rochester at the Bishop's Palace in Bromley. Whether that was instrumental in making him aware of the availability of part of Beckenham Manor as a business transaction is so far unknown.

1657 – The Manor of Beckenham is rejoined under Sir Walter St. John which had been divided into two moieties (parts) – see the legend transcript of the map under 1623.  Oliver St. John d.1639 who had purchased one part from Patricius Curwen circa 1635 left his part to a son John who dying young in 1657 leaves his part and the title baronet to his uncle Walter, now Sir Walter St. John of Battersea.This extract from Philipott’s Villare Cantianum of 1659 is part of his explanation of how the manor was divided and then rejoined: (Hasted subsequently quotes Philipott with differences and a lineage of the St. Johns). But this timeline has amended and we believe corrected information of the descent of Beckenham Manor.

Philipot: "this Mannor as I said before, being annexed to the patrimony of Thomas Tirrell, Humphrey Tirrell his Grandchild to whom it descended, passed away one Moietie of it in the thirty fifth year of Henry the eighth to Ralph Warren, and the other to Henry Parke; Warren alienated his Proportion not long after to Bradbury, from which Family about the latter End of Q. Eliz. it came over by Sale to Serjeant Gent, who gave it in Dower with his Daughter to Sir George Dalston of Cumberland, who in our Memory conveyed it to Sir Patrick Curwin of the same County, and he some few years since sold his Interest in it to Sir Oliver St. John of Batricksey in Surrey, who upon his Decease gave it to his Son then Mr. Walter, but now upon the Death of his Nephew, Sir Walter St. John Baronet, the other Moitie by Joan sole Heir of the abovesaid Henry Parke, came to be the Inheritance of Mr. Robert Leigh descended out of Cheshire, whose Successor about the latter End of King James alienated it to Sir Henry Snelgrave, from whom it descended to his Grandchild Mr. Henry Snelgrave, who not long since passed it away to Mr. Walter, now Sir Walter St. John Baronet, who lately hath exchanged the whole Mannor, for other Land with his Brother Mr. Henry St. John."

Hasted: (editor's comments in parenthesis)

Oliver, the eldest son, purchased the moiety of Beckenham of Sir Patrick Curwen, and died in the life time of his father, having married Catharine, daughter and coheir of Horatio, lord Vere of Tilbury, by whom he had Sir John St. John, bart. who died before he came of age, unmarried, and was succeeded by his uncle, Sir Walter St. John, in the title of Baronet, and in his estates at Lydiard Tregoze, Battersea, and Wandsworth, and in the moiety of this manor of Beckenham and advowson of the church, of which, having before purchased the other moiety, possessed now the entire fee of them. He died at his seat at Battersea, in 1708, and was interred there, leaving an only son Henry, who was on July 2, in the 2d year of king George I. created baron St. John of Battersea, and viscount St. John, and died about the 90th year of his age, in 1742, and was succeeded in the possession of this manor and advowson by Henry St. John, visc. Bolingbroke, his only son by his first wife Mary, second daughter and coheir of Robert Rich earl of Warwick. By his second wife, Angelica Magdalene, daughter of George Pillesary, a French officer under Louis XIV. he had three sons and one daughter; of which sons John, the second, will be mentioned hereafter, as continuator of the male line; the other two died unmarried Henry St. John, the only son of the lord viscount St. John, by his first wife, being one of the ministers of state to queen Anne, and of her privy council, was, in the 11th year of that reign, created Baron St. John of Lydiard Tregoze, in Wiltshire, and Viscount Bolingbroke, in Lincolnshire, with remainder, for want of issue male, to Sir Henry St. John, his father, and the heirs male of his body. In 1715, the 2d year of king George I. his honours were forfeited by attainder, but he was restored in blood in 1723, and two years afterwards an act passed, enabling him and his issue to inherit the family estate, notwithstanding his attainder. He died in 1751, in the seventyninth year of his age, having been twice married; first to Frances, daughter and coheir of Sir Francis Windebank, bart. of Berkshire; and secondly to Mary Clara des Champs de Maresilly, marchioness de Vilette, relict of the marquis Vilette, and niece to the celebrated madam de Maintenon, wife to Louis XIV. but having no issue by either, his titles and estates descended to his nephew, Frederick, the third lord viscount St. John, viz. son of John, second and only surviving son of Henry, viscount St. John, by his second wife Angelica, before mentioned.John viscount St. John, married in 1729, Anne, one of the three daughters and coheirs of Sir Robert Furnese, bart, of Waldershare, in this county, and had by her Frederick before mentioned, and Henry, now a lieutenant-general in the army, and two daughters.

Frederick, the eldest son, on his father's death, which happened in France, in 1749, succeeded to his titles and estates, and upon the death of his uncle, above mentioned, inherited his dignities of viscount Bolingbroke, and baron of St. John of Lydiard Tregoze; in 1757, he married the lady Diana Spencer, eldest sister of George, the present duke of Marlborough, (which marriage was dissolved by act of parliament, anno 8 George III.) by whom he had two sons, George and Frederick.

Frederick viscount Bolingbroke, in 1773, passed away the manor of Beckenham, and its appurtenances (in which conveyance the advowson of the church was excepted) an act having passed for this purpose, by sale to John Cator. (but excluding the old Manor House and  Court Downs previousely exchanged with the Burrells)


 


1659 - Thomas Philipott writes his “Diligent Survey of the Mannors of KENT: Entituled, VILLARE CANTIANƲM.” Information is later extracted by Edward Hasted for his Topography and History of Kent and Lysons’ Environs of London. (spellings in this tract are as they appear in the publication).

Bekenham near Bromley helps to give Name to the Hundred wherein it is placed, and of old time was held by Gentlemen, called in Latine Records de Rupella, in French de la Rochel, and in English Rokeley, and were in their original Etymologie extracted from Rochel in France, Richard de Rokeley died seised of this Mannor, in the fifth year of Edward the first, Rot. Esc. Num. 6. and was succeeded in the Possession by Philip de la Rokeley, and he held it likewise at his Death, which hapened in the 23 year of Edw. the first, Rot. Esc. Num. 39. and left it to his Sole Daughter and Heir Isolda de la Rokeley matched to William Bruin, by whom She had Issue Sir Maurice Bruin, Chamberlaine to K. Edw. the third, honoured with the Summons to Parliament as Baron amongst the Peers of this Realm, who by a Right derived to him from his Mother, was possest of this at his Death, in the twenty ninth of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 38. and transmitted a wide and spreading Revenue to his Posterity here, at Southokenden in Essex, and at Roumere in Hantshire, which last was given in Appendage to a younger Son, from whom the Bruins of Athelhampton in the County of Dorset, are lineally de∣scended. But when after a fair continuance this Family had flourished at this Place, the Distaffe prevailed against the Speare, and Sir Henry Bruins two Daughters and Coheirs about the Beginning of Edward the fourth, divided his Inheritance, each of them having a first and second Husband: Alice the eldest was first married to Robert Harleston of Essex Esquire, and after to Sir Thomas Heveningham; and Elizabeth second Daughter was wedded first to Thomas Tirrell of Heron in Essex Esquire, and after his Decease to Sir William Brandon Knight, who was Standard-bearer to Henry the seventh at Bosworth Field, where he was stain in asserting his Cause and Quarrel against Richard the third, and he had Issue by her Sir Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, the Flower and perfection of English Chivalrie in his Time, who sometimes kept his Residence at this place, (not as Proprietarie, but onely as Lessee, for the Sole In∣heritance upon the Division of Bruin's Estate accrued to Tirrell;) and here enter∣tained Henry the eighth, with all the Cunning Pompe of Magnificence, as he went to bestow a Visit at Hever, on his discarded, and repudiated wife Ann of Cleve. But to go on, this Mannor as I said before, being annexed to the patrimony of Thomas Tirrell, Humphrey Tirrell his Grandchild to whom it descended, passed away one Moie∣tie of it in the thirty fifth year of Henry the eighth to Ralph Warren, and the other to Henry Parke; Warren alienated his Proportion not long after to Bradbury, from which Family about the latter End of Q. Eliz. it came over by Sale to Serjeant Gent, who gave it in Dower with his Daughter to Sir George Dalston of Cumberland, who in our Memory conveyed it to Sir Patrick Curwin of the same County, and he some few years since sold his Interest in it to Sir Oliver St. John of Batricksey in Surrey, who upon his Decease gave it to his Son then Mr. Walter, but now upon the Death of his Nephew, Sir Walter St. John Baronet, the other Moitie by Joan sole Heir of the abovesaid Henry Parke, came to be the Inheritance of Mr. Robert Leigh descended out of Cheshire, whose Successor about the latter End of King James alienated it to Sir Henry Snelgrave, from whom it descended to his Grandchild Mr. Henry Snelgrave, who not long since passed it away to Mr. Walter, now Sir Walter St. John Baronet, who lately hath exchanged the whole Mannor, for other Land with his Brother Mr. Henry St. John.

Langley in this Parish is a second Seat of eminent Account, which was in elder Times the Possession of John de Malmains, who obtained a Charter of Free-War∣ren to his Lands in Bekenham, in the twelfth year of Edward the second, which was renewed to Henry de Cliffe, to whom they accrued by Purchase from Malmains, in the third year of Edward the third; but stayed not long in the Tenure of this Fa∣mily, for before the going out of Edward the third, I find the Propriety invested by Sale in Langley, to which Family the Foundation of that HOuse owes in part its Original, on which they ingraffed their own Name, which hath flourished under that Title ever since, though the Family be withered away and gone, the last of which Name at this place was Ralph Langley, who with Roger Twisden, Stephen Monins, Edward Monins, John Edingham or Engham, Richard Edingham, John Berton of Cotman∣ton in Shouldon, John Berham, John Betenham of Shurland in Pluckley, and others, Gentlemen of prime Rank in this County, were summoned to appear before Robert Poynings and John Perry, in the twelfth year of Henry the sixth, to disclaim the Title of the House of York, and this Ralph died in the year 1451, and ordered Langley and other demeasns at Bekenham to be sold for the discharging his Debts, the purport and Effects of which Will were accordingly performed, and his Estate at Bekenham and Langley, passed away by Sale to John Violett, whose Successors enjoyed it until the Be∣ginning of Hen. the eighth, and then it was conveyed to John Stiles Esq; who much inlarged the House with a supply of Buildings, and from him is it by Descent devolved to be the instant Possession of his Successor Sir Humphrey Stiles Knight and Baronet.

Kelseys lies likewise in this Parish, and may justly exact our Notice; by Deeds written in a Character that hath an Aspect upon the Reign of Henry the third, John de Kelsey, William de Kelsey, and others of that Sirname are represented to have an In∣terest in this Seat, and from hence it is probable the Kelseys of Surrey did derive their first Extraction, however by the Injuries of Time they have been in succeeding Generations cast under the umbrage of an obscurer Fortune: But I return, After this Family had deserted the Possession of this place, which was before the latter End of Richard the the second, I find the Brograves stepped in, and by purchase became Lords of the Fee, a Family which in very old Deeds writ themselves Burgrave, and sometimes Boroughgrave, though now a more easie Pronunciation hath melted it into Brograve, which represents the Etymologie of the Name, to have been in its Origi∣nal perfectly Saxon. In the year 1479, there was a License granted (as appears by the Records of Rochester) to William Brograve by the then Bishop of that Diocess, to erect an Oratory or Chapple at his Mannor-house of Kelseys, the Vestigia or Reliques of which are yet obvious to an inquisitive Eye, and from this William did the Title and possession in an even Current come down to Mr. Thomas Brograve, who being not many years since deceased, his Widow Mrs. Martha Brograve now in respect of Join∣ture, enjoys the present Possession of it.

Foxgrove is the last place of Account in this Parish, it had in elder times Pro∣prietaries of this Sirname; for I find John de Foxgrove paid respective Aid for it in the twentieth year of Edward the third, at making the Black Prince Knight. After this Family succeeded Bartholomew Lord Burwash, and he held it at his Decease, which was in the twenty ninth year of Edward the third, Rot. Esc. Num. 44. and from him it descended to his Son Bartholomew Lord Burwash, who in the forty third year of the abovesaid Prince, passed it away to Sir Walter de Paveley, and in his Family it remained untill the latter End of Richard the second, and then it was conveyed to Vaux of the County of North-Hampton, and there made its abode untill the latter End of Henry the sixth, and then it was alienated to John Grene Esquire, and he died possest of it in fourth year of Edward the fourth; and in this Family did the Title reside, untill the Beginning of Henry the eighth, and then it was demised to Beversea, and Humphrey Beversea, I find held it in the eighteenth year of Henry the eighth, and his Descendant passed it away to Luke Hollingworth, and he about the Beginning of K. Edward the sixth, sold his Interest in it to Alderman Sir Jo. Oliff of London, and he dying with∣out Issue Male, Joan matched to John Leigh of Addington Esquire, was his sole Heir, and in Right of this Alliance, did it come down to Sir Francis Leigh late of East-Wickham; whose Widow Dowager the Lady Christian Leigh, is now in Possession of it.


Hasted could the report the events of the next 150 years but we can dispute a few details later in this timeline.

1660 - King Charles II until 1685 (The Restoration of the Monarchy)

1660 - Langley passes from Humphrey Style (1585-1660) who dies without issue so his half brother William Style (1603-1679) inherits. This portrait of William is dated to 1636 and shows him before becoming landlord of Langley. William has two sons and two daughters but only one son, Humphrey has descendants. (see 1679)

1666 - Woolseys Farm ?; Thomas Bedford of Wolsees is recorded as being buried at St.George's. Several Bedfords are in the records, one of Wickham and the others, sometimes infants described as children of Thomas. Bedford's status as either leaseholder or labourer is not identified.


1668 - Sympson's Place;

Reference No:
U DDBM/34/12
Dates:
7 Feb 1668
Description:

(i) William Martyn of Middle Temple, London, gent., and wife Elizabeth, widow and admin. of Richard Bosvile of Bionnie, co. of Staffs. esq.

(ii) John Byrch of Cannocke, co. Staffs., gent. and Walter Higges of Stafford, gent.

(iii) Sir Richard Oteley of Pitchford co. Salop and Sir Henry Bosvile of Eynsford co. Kent and Robert Bosvile esq., (as (i))

Capital messuage called Sympsons place in Bromeley; 400 acres woodland in pars. Beckenham, Bromeley, Hayes, Lewsham, Orpington and Keiston all in the co. Kent: To uses declared in indenture of previous dated. Witn. Geo. Gyford, Rob. Brent, John Evens

(Hull History Centre)

1670 - Simpsons Place; Court of Chancery. William Style v. Martin and Bosville.


The Bosvilles had occupancy of Simpson's Place Bromley (including parts  in Beckenham) since Elizabeth Bosville (widow) had  been married to Humphrey Style. The case centred around the conditions of a loan to the Styles which it was claimed was secured by the property of Simpsons Place. William Style successfully reclaimed Simpsons through this case.

The LORD KEEPER . Justice Wyld . ER William Style , by Original Bill , against William Martin and Elizabeth his Wife , Relict and Administratrix of Richard Bosvile Esq . and Robert Bosvile , Son and Heir of the said Richard , by Guardian . December 16 . The bill was an original bill to set aside a decree in 1664 , obtained by the defendant on a bill of reviver ( to which the now plaintiff is no party ) against John Style , heir of Sir Humphrey Style , and others , as obtained by fraud . The case was thus : Sir Humphrey Style ' s lady ( mother of the said Richard Bosvile ) had by his request mortgaged a manor of hers for 30001(£3000) . borrowed by sir Humphrey 8 Novemb . 8 Car . 1 .(year 8 of Charles I) And sir Humphrey had agreed with his lady , that if he did not pay off that 30001 . that then his lands in Kent should stand obliged to pay 15001 . of the 30001 . for the ease and benefit of the said lady and her heirs . And 15 Novemb . 8 Car . I . he conveyed his Kentish lands to trustees , which the defendants say was for that purpose , but no such express trust . Trin . 1641 . The lady Bosvile being dead , Richard Bosvile her son and heir exhibited his bill against sir Humphrey and the trustees of the Kentish lands , to have the benefit of this agreement . And in Trin . 1642 , two witnesses were examin ed to the proof of the agreement against sir Humphrey Style , and that the conveyance of the Kentish lands was on that trust . The wars coming on , there was a rest , and no farther proceedings till 1663 . In 1665 , Richard Bosvile , who was a recusant , died , his heir then and yet an infant . Michalmas 1663 . Martin & Uxor , and the other defendant , the infant , brought a bill of reviver against John Style , the heir of Sir Humphrey , and the heir of the surviving trustee . And in 1664 , after the answer of John Style , who by answer said he was willing the plaintiff ' s in the bill of reviver may have their money , if he may have the rest of the lands , and replication and farther proof taken and published , it was decreed , that the plaintiffs in the bill of reviver should hold the lands against John Style and his heirs , and all claiming under sir Humphrey Style since the first bill , until the 15001 . with costs and interest were paid off . Of which bill of reviver the now plaintiff had due notice given him , and he might , if he had pleased , come in by a cross bill , & c . before the decree . The now plaintiff made title by an intail of Sir Humphrey Style on him in 1638 , precedent to the original bill , so that title was not bound by the decree ; but that settle ment being in truth revoked in 1643 , he made another title by the will of Sir Humphrey Style in 1658 . And for the now plaintiff it was insisted , that there was a collusion in getting the decree , the defendant John Style admitting it by answer to it on the matter , and the now plaintiff , who was terr - tenant , no party to it . And the report of the master who had computed the 15001 . and interest to amount to 36001 . was confirmed without any defence by John Style . And the rule for binding titles pendente lite , ( which is the rule of the practice at this day ) was the Lord Bacon ' s rule , and that rule is : That lis pendens binds , if it be in full prosecution ; but here was above twenty years cessation , and the plaintiff had in that time bought in incumbrances , and improved the lands , and the notice given the plaintiff of the bill of reviver was too late , issue being joined , so that he could not come in . And it is said where judgment is obtained against the land , and the terr - tenant is no party , a writ of deceit lies for the terr tenant ; and so in a parity of reason this bill . was maintainable for the now complainant . Spencer ' s Case , 5th Report , was cited . And it was further said for the plaintiff , that there  was no such agreement between sir Humphrey Style and his lady as the decree was grounded upon . For the defendant it was said , that the plaintiff was stopt to say there was such an agreement by decree .

Lord Keeper . A stranger may falsify at the common - law ; and if the decree be by fraud , the plaintiff may then be admitted to falsify the agreement . But it is not form , but the  substance of a decree , that all be bound that come in pendente lite . But the Defendant ' s counsel insisted , that there was no  fraud ; for the the main witnesses which were to the agreement were examined in Sir Humphrey Style ' s life - time . Those which were examined after , were to prove the pay ment of the 30001 . the mortgage - money , which was paid afterwards ; and notice was given to the now plaintiff before any examination of the bill of reviver , and could go no other wise , unless they would have betrayed the infant ; for if he had gone by original bill , they must have lost the witnesses examined on the first bill .

Lord Keeper . The war and infancy excuse the laches ,  and the witnesses to the main were examined in Sir Humphrey ' s life ; and so the pretence of the plaintiffs improvement , and taking off incumbrances , nothing of that in the bill , but in the replication : and so dismissed the bill .


https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=n_8vAAAAIAAJ&lpg=PA150&dq=bosvile%20style&pg=PA150#v=onepage&q=bosvile%20style&f=false

The Bill was brought in 1664 after William Style had inherited Langley in 1659 and dragged on until much later than 1670.  Other evidence will show that Bosvilles had occupancy of Simpsons Place, see 1673. William Style had a son Humphrey who takes over the estates


1671 – A list of benefactors to the Parish of Lewisham lists: “William Bond, A house at Stump’s Hill, from which nothing is now received. To the poor of Lewisham and Southend “ (source: Lysons, Environs of London). We cannot say if this is a house on the site of Beckenham Place or one near it. The maps of Beckenham and Foxgrove manors indicate a strip of land which lies between the northern part of the two Manor’s lands and another reference mentions ‘woodland between Foxgrove and Beckenham Manors. A map of the Cator road diversion shows a farm which was between Foxgrove Farm and Copers Cope Farm and so far has escaped identification by name. The Parish boundary in circa 1860 was established to run across Stumps Hill  but we cannot say for certain where the Lewisham side was in 1671 but the indications are that it was toward the hamlet of Southend. William Bond cannot be positively identified although a will exists for a William Bond of London dying in 1670/71 (difficult to read).

1673 - Sympsons Place; U DDBM/36/11 Settlement (i) Sir Henry Bosvile of Eynsford, Robert Brent of Grayes Inn esq., Benjamin Green citizen and haberdasher of London and Edward Browne of Cliffords Inn, gent. (ii) Richard and Bridgett Bosvile younger children of Richard Bosvile of Bionnie, co. Staffs., esq. (iii) Robert Bosvile esq. (son and heir of the said Richard B. dec'd) and Elizabeth Martin widow of William Martin of the Middle Temple, gent., dec'd Capital messuage called Simpsons Place in Bromley with all appurtenances and 400 acres of woods in Beckenham, Bromley, Hayes, Lewsham, Orpington and Keiston: Witn. E. Simanans, Paul Pullein (Hull History Centre)

Although there is some ongoing legal dispute between William Style and the Bosvilles whereby Style is recovering Simpsons from the Bosvilles this settlement document shows a transfer between the Bosville family.

1674 - Hugh Raymond's date of birth. He later becomes owner of Langley Park, Beckenham and father of Jones Raymond and Amy Raymond who will become owners of part of Foxgrove Manor much of which eventually becomes Beckenham Place Park. His family came from Saling in Essex and he is referred to as Hugh Raymond of Stepney, Saling and Langley. He becomes a ship’s captain with the East India Company and a director of the South Sea Company. He is later implicated in the South Sea Bubble affair. His story is interesting and deserves more investigation. Several records are in the British Library.

1679 - Langley; Humphrey Style (1648-1718) inherits Langley from his father William Style (1603-1679)

1682 - Elmers End; 10 February 1682[/3] Release (lease missing) for £91 of messuage in Beckenham, barn, orchard, land and 2 closes called Eastfield, at Elmers End (8 1/2 acres.);
John Sumpner, of Lambeth, waterman and Anne, his wife
to Hugh Surrey, of London, merchant

(source: BHC).  These records are a small  window on the smaller properties and owners for periods which are very much a mystery. see 1703 connected.

1684 - Henry St. John (1652-1742); from Lysons;  In 1684, being then Mr. Henry St. John, he was tried for the murder of Sir William Estcourt, Bart. and was convicted. Bishop Burnet speaking, no doubt, of this affair, tells the story thus:—That a young gentleman of a noble family, in the year 1684, being at supper with a large party, a sudden quarrel arose between him and another gentleman, very warm words passed, and swords were drawn, three persons were engaged in the rencounter, one of whom was killed on the spot, the other two were indicted for murder; it appeared uncertain by which the fatal wound was given, nor did the proof against either amount to more than manslaughter: yet the gentleman abovementioned being one of the two, was advised to confess the indictment, and to let sentence pass for murder. He was threatened with the utmost rigour of the law if he neglected to follow this advice; if he complied, he was promised a pardon. He thought it prudent to comply, and was convicted accordingly: but to his cost found, that his pardon was to be purchased at the high rate of 16,000 l.; one half of which the king converted to his own use; and bestowed the remainder upon two ladies who were in great favor. This is bishop Burnet's account (fn. 36). It appears, however, that after the conviction, a doubt arose, whether the king could pardon him.—The matter was much debated, and bishop Barlow wrote one of his cases of conscience upon the subject (fn. 37) : he determines the point in the affirmative. It is said, that to obviate all doubts, the king granted him only a reprieve; in confirmation of this, no pardon appears to have been enrolled (fn. 38) : the reprieve was for a long term of years, which the extreme old age which he attained rendered it probable that he would survive. In 1716 he was created Baron St. John of Battersea, and Viscount St. John, and died in 1742, as mentioned above, on the verge of ninety. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/london-environs/vol1/pp26-48
Henry was the son of Walter St.John who had bought one half of Beckenham Manor in 1651. His son John  and grandson Frederick followed him in ownership of this moiety. The two ladies referred to would have been among Charles II's string of mistresses one assumes.

1685 - King James II until 1688

1688 - Peter Burrell I (1649-1718)  purchases Kelseys mansion and land from a descendant of the Brograves. (source: Hasted). Kelseys is an estate of which part will become Kelsey Park, Beckenham, another public park in the remainder of a private estate. Burrell becomes 'of Kelsey' and his descendants will acquire parts of Foxgrove Manor circa 1760 through marriage to Amy Raymond, Jones Raymond’s sister, at least until they exchange it with John Cator.

The Brograves sell Kelsey as a result of financial problems. They had acquired loans over a substantial period and were unable to repay them. Analysis of documents from archives is ongoing. (source; K.Baldwin)

This document may add substance to the details or reasons for the transaction.

http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT7/C78/C78no1063/IMG_0209.htm

and https://uh.edu/waalt/index.php/C78_1688

1689 - King William III and Queen Mary II (after the Glorious Revolution of 1688)

1690 - A Chancery Case Short title: Burrell v Brograve. Plaintiffs: Peter Burrell merchant of London. Defendants: John Francis Brograve. Court of Chancery: Six Clerks Office: Short title: Burrell v Brograve. Plaintiffs: Peter Burrell merchant of London. Defendants: John Francis Brograve esq. Subject: Sale of an estate: Kelsey, Beckenham, Kent ; Hayes, Kent and Bromley. This would take some unravelling as the Brograves had several tenants and intermixed with family names such as Bygrave an Bygrove who may have been related. (source National Archive).

1691 - TNA

C 7/602/21
Description:

Short title: Ligoe v Leigh.

Plaintiffs: Francis Ligoe.

Defendants: Eleanor Leigh (widow of Thomas Leigh) and Francis Leigh.

Place or subject: manor of Foxgrove, Kent.

Document type: answer only

1692 - Peter Burrell II (1692-1756) of Beckenham is born, he will become Peter Burrell I of Langley through marrying Amy Raymond (daughter of Hugh Raymond, sister of Jones Raymond). Peter Burrells I, II, and III of Langley can be traced through History of Parliament online as they were all MP's and held various posts. Some confusion is likely as there were four Peter Burrells in Beckenham from 1688 to 1820.

1699 - The birth of Amy Raymond (1699-1789), daughter of Hugh Raymond of Langley, she would become Mrs Amy Burrell and later as Peter Burrell's widow hold ownership of Foxgrove Manor lands within the park.

The Years 1700 to 1800

This century sees several substantial exchanges of ownership of land in and around Beckenham and elsewhere. The exchanges are due to purchases and sales, inheritance by bequest and some straightforward exchanges of land. There is a background of social interaction and intermarriage which I will refer to but generally the protagonists are written about elsewhere and internet sources can be sought to expand on their stories.

1702 - Queen Anne until 1714

1703 – John Cator the Elder (sometimes spelt Cater or Catter) is born in Ross on Wye. They are a Quaker family and their records are in Friends Meeting House registers. His father is a glovemaker, Jonah Cator and there is a modest amount of land owned by the family. He would later live in Southwark and own the timber business. He will become John Cator the younger’s father in 1728 and it is John Cator the younger who will establish Beckenham Place through several land purchases and exchanges from 1757 until his death in 1806. John Cator’s impact spreads from parts of Lewisham, Sydenham, Beckenham, Bromley, and elsewhere in Kent, Surrey and Essex.(Pat Manning’s “The Cators of Beckenham and Woodbastwick” has more details)

1703 - Lease for 1 year (release missing) of messuage, barn, orchard, toft (site of former barn) (4 perches), in Beckenham, 2 closes of land called Eastfield (3½ acres) in Elmers End, occupier Richard Wolfe 18/08/1703
Parties:| 1. Henry Batt of Penge, yeoman
2. Thomas Surrey, a son of Hugh Surrey of London, merchant, deceased
3. William Tapsfield, of Beckenham, yeoman (source: BHC)

Further to the record of 1682, this records Hugh Surrey's passing and the lease of the property by his son Thomas. Henry Batt is a significant landowner around Penge. The difference in acreage 8.1/2 against 3.1/2 makes me wonder if its a transcription error, 3 and 8 looking similar.


1706 - Jones Raymond is born on the 6th November, baptised on the 29th, the son of Hugh Raymond and Dinah/Dynah (nee Jones), he will become landowner, if only for a short time before his death, of parts of Foxgrove Manor and some of what would later become Beckenham Place Park under John Cator the Younger.


Jones Raymond will become a director in the East India Company eventually selling a ship to the Royal Navy which would take part in the Anson voyage to the Pacific which made Anson an immensely rich person through capturing a Spanish treasure galleon. Ironically, the expedition was crewed by sailors from the Naval hospital most of whom would perish on the voyage one way or another. An interesting connection will be that Admiral Piercy Brett who will occupy Clockhouse at Beckenham/Penge borders is a lieutenant on one of Anson’s fleet of ships. And Clockhouse is subsequently bought by Joseph Cator, brother of John Cator the younger.

Hasted mentions two ‘Jones Raymonds’ ie the first one having a son of the same name, but records show there was only the one who died in 1768.

1706 - Kent House and other propertyApril;  Attested copy articles of partition to divide late estate of Countess of Oxford in Kent and Surrey To Henry Batt - Newlands and Davyes, grounds in Lewisham occupied by Batt; 2 messuages and land in Battersea, Surrey, occupied by John Fox; Messuage, Penge Green, Surrey, occupied by William Musgrave; Lands at Lewisham occupiers Robert Tilt and Richard Clowder; Messuage and land in Bromley and occupied by Thomas Combes; Garden plot by the road at West End of Bromley occupied by the tenant of Kent Lands grounds, and premises at Southborough occupied by Colonel King; Lands, grounds, and premises at Bromley occupied by John White;

To John Reynolds - Kent House Farm; Greenways, Mathews, Allens, and Hamonds Cottage occupied by Thomas Brazier; Messuage at Bromley occupied by Thomas Gardner.

To Robert King, Peter Gelsthorpe and wife: Manor of Rede or Read Court, Marden, Kent occupied by Nicolas Martin, Messuage with backside and orchard Bromley occupied by Richard Ashworth; 2 acres by Plaster Lane, Bromley ocupied by. Thomas Francis; Meadow (1acre) near Mill River, Bromley, with barn and yard, occupied by Edward Cosyns, gentleman; Shrimpsgrove (30 acres) in Orpington and Bromley occupied by George Westbroke, gentleman. source: BHS

1707 - Bromley HC docs

815/6
Title Probate of will of Henry Batt
Date Will: 23 June 1707; Probate: 20 May 1715
Description Probate of will of Henry Batt.
Bequests of messuage, appurtenances, and 14 acres, Beckenham (purchased of children of John Harris)
occupied by John Woodley, to daughter, Mary Batt, and yearly rent of Fullers, messuage and 15 acres at Sydenham Green, Lewisham, occupied by John Constable, to wife, Mary.
Instructions to wife and son, Henry, executors, to complete purchase for £3,000 of messuages, lands, hereditaments, in Lewisham, Beckenham, Battersea, and Bromley parishes, part of estate of late Earl of Oxford.
To sell, to settle outstanding debts: messuage, appurtenances and land, Bromley, occupied by Colonel Edward King; messuage, appurtenances, 4 acres, Bromley, occupied by Thomas Comb, butcher, 26 acres near. Bromley Common, occupied by Robert Shorter; 9 acres, Sydenham Green, occupied by Robert Tilt; 15 acres, Sydenham Green occupied by Richard Clowder.
Bequest of messuage, appurtenances and 15 acres, Battersea, Surrey occupied by Robert Fox, to daughter, Jane Batt.
Residue of estate to Henry Batt.
Money bequests to daughters Mary and Jane, and brother Joseph, and personal estate to wife and son.

1708 - Sir Walter St. John 3rd Baronet (Lord of the Manor of Beckenham) dies at his home in Battersea. (source; Hasted). Sir Walter had sat in two Cromwell parliaments and lost his seat on the Restoration of the Monarchy. His son, Henry 1st Viscount St. John (1652-1742) inherits the Manor of Beckenham along with Battersea and other estates. It should be noted that in some cases landowners may not have resided in the area. The St. Johns were from Wiltshire with homes in Battersea and Walworth, Bolingbrokes had estates in Lincolnshire and elsewhere as did the Earl of Rockingham and Sondes families (Kent). Some of them were members of parliament of held positions at court and in government so would want residences close to London or Westminster. As previously mentioned, a map of 1736 shows the Honourable John St. John as either landowner of occupant of parts of Beckenham Manor.

1708 - 17th January 728/4/1 Bargain and sale for £300 of messuage called Lurchens, with land (33 acres) and 2 closes called Wheatfields (8 acres); recites deed, 1684 John Angier, of Hertfordshire, esq
to Thomas Johnson, of London, vintner. Lurchens Farm it seems will pass into the Humphreys family and this thread needs further research.  In the viscinity of Elmers End.

1709 - (near Kelsey) Counterpart marriage settlement and jointure 5 February 1709[/10] Counterpart marriage settlement and jointure made on the intended marriage between Nathaniell Gatton of Beckenham, gentleman and Elizabeth Whiffing, spinster, between Gatton (1st part); Whiffing (2nd part) and Richard Pearch of Keston, Kent (uncle of Elizabeth Whiffing) and John Uppington of London, gentleman (3rd part). In consideration of the intended marriage, Gatton bargains and sells property in Beckenham, Kent, known as Holdens, Wallnut Tree Field, Colman's Croft and other land, to the third parties (Burrell at a later date) to make provision for the marriage and for the jointure of Elizabeth Whiffing. Memorandum dated 12 June 1728 that Gatton and Richard Peach (nephew of Richard Peach of the 3rd part) assigned the property to Merrick Burrell of Lisbon, Northamptonshire.

Gatton and  Whiffin are married  10th Feb 1709 at St. Michael Crooked Lane, London.


1711 – Francis Leigh of Hawley, Sutton at Hone dies. He is landlord of Foxgrove Manor and several other places but may have been in some debt. His affairs seem in some disarray and his estate is left in the possession of executors of his will. He requests that any remainder after paying his debts, bequests and funeral expenses go to his eldest son also named  Francis. The Foxgrove Manor gets sold to John Tolson. Hasted and others had said that Francis requested his estates be sold which didn’t really explain the situation. Hopefully a fuller account of the situation will emerge via records of the Court of Chancery but these are numerous. Later Gazette press releases in 1716 explain that Foxgrove is sold to pay creditors. it descended to Sir Francis Leigh, who died in 1711, having directed this and other estates to be sold. This farm was purchased, in 1716, by Mr. John Tolson, and descended to Lancelot Tolson Tilly, who devised it to Timewell Brydges, Esq. for his life, with remainder to John and Edward Brydges, of Wotton. In 1765, it was sold by the Brydges's to Jones Raymond, Esq. who died in 1768,(editors note: by this time Cator had acquired the site of the Mansion in 1760 and Raymond exchanged land with Cator in 1760 casting doubt on the 1765 date) having left this estate between Amy his sister, relict of Peter Burrell, Esq. and William and George Evelyn Glanville, Esqrs. the sons of Bridget, another sister. Mrs. Burrell, having purchased their share, became possessed of the whole. She died in 1789, when this estate devolved upon her son, the late Sir William Burrell, Bart. who sold it to his nephew, Sir Peter (now Lord Gwedir). Sir Peter Burrell exchanged it, in 1793, for other lands, with John Cator, Esq. who is the present proprietor.

1712 – John Tolson purchases Foxgrove Manor presumably from the executors of Francis Leigh’s will. See 1711. Some clarification is needed as Tolson leaves unspecified land in Bromley in his will in 1713 but see 1727 Lancelot Tolson. Foxgrove is mentioned in Chancery Court cases in 1716 in association with paying Francis Leigh's creditors. There is some question as to whether John Tolson bought Foxgrove or  was it his brother Lancelot Tolson.

1714 - King George I until 1727

1714 - Bromley Historic Collections record: Covenant to levy fine of 1 messuage, 1 stable, 1 barn, 1 orchard, 1 garden and water yard 15/04/1714 Crabb Grow (8 acres); woodland (2 acres) lying between the manors of Beckenham and Foxgrove, land (1 acre) occupied Thomas Hughes; cottage, orchard yard backside occupied Thomas Stoute and cottage yard backside occupied Richard Steele, at Clay Hill, Beckenham Samuell Adgate of Bromley, yeoman, Thomas Matkins, Citizen of London, joiner, and Elizabeth his wife, and Robert Sutton of London, barber Chirugeon, and Mary his wife. To Stephen Colstone of Southwark, Surrey, plumber, and William Wicker, of Beckenham, yeoman.  ref.303/1

It would be tempting to identify the Woodland as the strip of land roughly between the mansion and Beckenham Hill ie Stumpshill Wood. ‘Between’ the manors could mean almost anywhere. See the later Foxgrove and Beckenham Manor maps overlain which show an area between the two. Also the 1785 road diversion plan which I have attempted to identify with possible field names and the 1760 Act of Parliament to exchange land between Cator and the Raymond/Burrell family. It wasn’t unknown for fields to be renamed and there is 46 years gap between this and the 1760 Act.

Crabb Grow or Grove is on the Beckenham Manor map along what is now Bromley Road toward Clay Hill and does become Cator’s at a later date.

Covenant to levy a fine is part of a buying and selling property process. It implies one party had not held up his side of the bargain.
Chirurgeon is an archaic spelling for Surgeon.

1715 - Henry St. John, son of Henry St John, Ist Viscount St. John:(Manor of Beckenham)  In 1715, the 2d year of King George I. his honours were forfeited by attainder (for treason), but he was restored in blood in 1723, and two years afterwards an act passed, enabling him and his issue to inherit the family estate, notwithstanding his attainder.(Hasted). Because he supported the Jacobite rebellion seeking to prevent George I taking the throne. This may be reason why a half brother, The Honourable John St. John is shown as landlord on maps and documents.

https://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1690-1715/member/st-john-henry-ii-1678-1752

1716 – Foxgrove Manor which is believed to have changed hands in 1712 is subject of a Chancery case settling the proceeds of the sale to pay Francis Leigh’s creditors. Sir Francis Leigh of Hawley, in Kent, on his death in 1711 left his estates to executors including Viscount Lord Cheyne and William Longueville of Inner Temple to dispose of and settle any remainder after his debts, bequests and funeral expenses on his eldest son also named Francis. They apparently did not act on the will leaving it to Francis’s wife named Frances to settle. Whether as executor she sold Foxgrove to John Tolson prior to his death in 1713 or it was sold to Lancelot Tolson about 1716. Nevertheless, Lancelot Tolson held it at the time of his death in 1727

1718 – The death of Peter Burrell of Kelsey, the first of the four Peter Burrells associated with Beckenham. His son inherits Kelseys, Peter Burrell 1692-1756

1718 - Humphrey Style (1648-1718) outlives his sons so his daughter Elizabeth inherits Langley. She had married John Elwill in 1704 who by right of his wife holds Langley. Hasted says: "Humphrey Style's only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, carried it in marriage to Sir John Elwill, bart. who died in 1727, without issue by her. This family of Elwill was of Exeter in Devonshire, who bore for their arms, Ermine on a chevron engrailed, between three eagles displayed gules, three annulets or, and were advanced to the dignity of a baronet, in the person of Sir John Elwill, in the 8th year of queen Anne's reign. He was twice married, but left issue only, by his second wife, the daughter and heir of — Leigh of Egham, in Surry, by whom he had two sons, Sir John above-mentioned, and Edmund, who succeeded his brother in title and in this estate of Langley, and in 1732 transferred his property in it, together with the house, called Langley-house, the park, and also the north and south isles of the parish church of Beckenham, to Hugh Raymond of Great Saling, in Essex, esq. who settled them on his only son, Jones Raymond, esq. in tail general; remainder to his eldest daughter, Amy, who married Peter Burrell, esq. and her issue male. On his death his son, Jones Raymond, esq succeeded to this estate, and kept his shrievalty for this county at Langley in 1738, in which year he died, and was succeeded by his son, of the same name, who died unmarried in 1768, on which it descended, by the intail before-mentioned, to his sister, Amy, before mentioned, whose husband, Peter Burrell, esq. in her right, became possessed of it. He died in 1756, having had by her, who survived him, four sons and two daughters. Mrs. Burrell, his widow, afterwards resided here, and died in 1794, on which this seat descended, together with her other estates in this parish, to her grandson, sir Peter Burrell, bart. since created lord Gwydir, of whom a full account has already been given, and he is the present possessor of this seat, with the park and grounds belonging to it."

1719 - Peter Burrell (the second) is recorded as buying a number of fields seemingly to consolidate his Kelsey estate. The fields have been identified on the 1735 Burrell map as being around and between the pre-existing estate. The fields named in the document are Wellers, Leasons, Stirt, Little Down and Longs (source: Kent Archive, research K.Baldwin) (document) appears to date from about 1720 which appears to read Wollers 2.5 acres bounding Bromley to Beckenham highway to the south, lands late of St John West and those late of Lady Leigh North & East. The vendors were Thomas Davies of Wapping surgeon, Christiana Davies wife of William Davies & Thomas Davies of St Dionis Backchurch his only son and heir in the first part, John Russell of Gosburton Lincolnshire clerk eldest son of John Russell late of Wapping clerk who survived Samuel Nicholls late of Wapping woollen draper second part and Peter Burrell third part £930 also including Little Downes 1a Upper Leazons 7.5a late occ Widow Kempsall, Brenan? Field 1.5a (west of lane leading to Peter Burrell’s and abutting his land) occ Roger Brown, Longs late Reuben Musgrave now occ John Walford and Stirt 29a occ Robert Fox – indenture 1718 for 21 yrs. 

1720 - An estate plan of Foxgrove Manor is drawn by surveyor John Holmes. (source: British Library). Though the plan only survives as the redrawn 1766 version by Proudlove (see 1766) it implies that fields and plots aren't much changed. Another map of neighbouring land, Lodge Farm 1720, is in Bromley Historic Collections, showing the landowner on the Foxgrove side as Mr Towlson (Tolson - spellings were often variable and phonetic). I assume the 1720 Foxgrove map was drawn to identify Tolson estates and if it survives may be in some undiscovered archive.

This is part of the  1776 copy which shows  the same landlords as the 1766 but is easier to read. It does not however illustrate the outlying parts of the estate of Stone Farm, Plaistow, parts near Langley and Elmers End etc.

Courtesy of the British Library, Foxgrove Manor extract

1721 - An inventory is taken of all Hugh Raymond's assets, both business and domestic, to do with the South Sea Bubble affair. The British Library has various records such as: "A True and Exact particular and inventory of all and singular the lands ... and personal estate whatsoever which H. Raymond was seised or possessed of, upon the first of June, 1720 ... Made and delivered pursuant to the late act of Parliament. Together with the abstract of the same ". The officers of the South Sea Company are forced to compensate shareholders, a complex subject that cannot be adequately covered here but Hugh Raymond survives with enough assets to be able to purchase Langley Park in 1732. He will become indirectly associated with the story of Beckenham Place.  Hugh Raymond did not own any of Langley at this time but is resident of Saling in Essex, Wapping and Stepney with extensive property assets. Hugh Raymond was also a ship’s captain with the East India Company and other connections with the EIC will become apparent. He had also been a director in the South Sea Company. The Raymond family had extensive estates in Essex and elsewhere.

1723 - Amy Raymond, daughter of Hugh Raymond marries Peter Burrell II of Beckenham and Kelseys who will style himself eventually “of Langley”. The 'Peter Burrells' become confusing as there are four of them associated with Beckenham. Beginning with Peter Burrell of Beckenham (1649-1718), Peter Burrell I of Langley(1692-1756), Peter Burrell II of Langley (1723-1775), Peter Burrell III of Langley(1754-1820) made Lord (Baron) Gwydyr in 1796. Some sources will number them I to IV. History of Parliament online is again a good source of information about them and offices they held etc. This marriage is about 9 years before Hugh Raymond purchases land in Bromley. I believe the links via the East India and South Sea Companies brings the families together.

1723 - A map of Peter Burrell’s estate is drawn by J.Pidduck, copied by Robert Borrowman for his book of 1910. Borrowman copied the map from another copy made in 1829 which was in the Hoare family documents.The original is at Knepp Castle, Sussex, the home of Sir Charles R. Burrell, Bt. The map possibly relates to the Peter Burrell/Amy Raymond marriage settlement several plans were drawn in 1723. All the properties in this map are south of Beckenham with little or none in the Manors of Beckenham or Foxgrove. By marrying Amy Raymond the Burrells came into line for inheriting Langley Park and parts of Foxgrove later. We know of two maps of 1723 which exist in the British Library of a property near Penge Common and of Woolseys Farm at Clay Hill under the Burrells.

With thanks to Sir Charles Burrell Bt. of Knepp Castle, East Sussex who is a direct descendant of William Burrell, a brother of Peter Burrell of Langley. William Burrell is recorded on the 1769 Andrews, Drury and Herbert map as residingat Kelseys


Part of Borrowman's copy alongside the original at Knepp Castle

1725 -  Penge: The vicar of Battersea returned to Bishop Willis that there were only thirteen houses and sixty inhabitants in Penge, who went to Beckenham Church, and for whose care he paid a trifling consideration to the incumbent of Beckenham. (source H.E.Malden

1726 - Thomas Brograve; believed to be a descendant of the Beckenham Brograves; following a court case for murder/manslaughter which seems to be relate to a duel or disturbance. Brograve was branded 'burnt in the hand'.  Compared to punishments meeted out to other felons below:


The Tryals being over, the Court procee ded to give Judgement as followeth;

Receiv'd Sentence of Death, 15.

John Cotterel , John Vanwick , Joseph Treen , Mary Scuffam , John Gillingham , John Map , Katherine Hays , Thomas Billings , Thomas Woods , Gabriel Lawrence , William Griffin , George Keger , Thomas Wright , Henry Vigous , James Dupree .

John Murrel was likewise convicted Capitally; but being dangerously ill, his Sentence was respited.

Katherine Hays to be drawn on a Hurdle, to the Place of Execution, and there to be burnt.

Burnt in the Hand, 3.

Francis Chandler , Thomas Bragrave , and Katherine Blisset .

To be Whipt, 1.

William Baker .

To be Transported, 34.

Sarah Orchard , Sarah Hutchins , Mary Loveday , Thomas Atkinson , William Watson , Mary Cockshead , Mary Trigger , Rebecca Bignell , Ann Macclane , Elizabeth Fletcher , John Jackson , Joseph Brockhouse , Benjamin Blocksedge , Temperance Stonly, Rebecca Read , Thomas Owen , Charles Atkins , James Hopkins , William Munn , Thomas Fleetwood , Richard Richmond , Isabel Harris , Tozar Williams, Samuel Butler , William Thomson , James Roberts , Ann Ambrose , John Mackey , William Lawrence , Katherine Hastings , Thomas; Cartwright. Philip-Chars O' Conner, Sarah Dickins , Sarah Fox , Edward Prics , John Burdet Mary Williams , William Parker , Edward Simkins .

John Boon , to suffer 12 Months Imprisonment, and not to be discharged till he finds Security for his good Behaviour, for 1 Year more.

1727 - King George II until 1760

1727 – Lancelot Tolson leaves land he inherited from his brother John Tolson in trust to his nephew, Lancelot Tolson Tilly. This includes Foxgrove Manor, Stone Farm etc according to Hasted. (This farm was purchased, in 1716, by Mr. John Tolson, and descended to Lancelot Tolson Tilly, who devised it to Timewell Brydges, Esq. for his life, with remainder to John and Edward Brydges, of Wotton. In 1765, it was sold by the Brydges's to Jones Raymond, Esq. who died in 1768) But John Tolson died in 1713 and had land in Bromley which was most likely Foxgrove at the time of his death. The ownership through the Tolsons and Tillys is complicated not least by the fact that offspring died before parents and sometimes intestate. However, studying the wills of the Tolsons and Tillys shows that  land was left by Mary Tilly in three bequests, see 1743. The account by Hasted leaves some questions not least the date of 1716 which does match the Chancery Court case concerning the disposal of Foxgrove by Francis Leigh’s executors to pay his creditors but that would imply that Lancelot Tolson purchased Foxgrove, perhaps to extend property his brother John purchased before 1713. 

1727 - Elizabeth Style had carried Langley (source: from Hasted) in marriage to Sir John Elwill, bart. who died in 1727, without issue by her. The property of Langley and title passed to Sir John Elwill's brother Edmund, now Sir Edmund Elwill.

1728 - John Cator the elder marries Mary Brough as recorded on 11th February (source: P.Manning and Ancestry.co.uk). We can now access the Quaker meeting house record via online heritage sites (Ancestry.co.uk). This marriage takes place at the Savoy and Westminster meeting house. John Cator (the elder) is described as a Timber Merchant and so is his father-in-law John Brough of the Parish of St. James, Westminster. John was only in his 20’s and whether he had his own business is questionable, perhaps working for the man who becomes his father in law. Pat Manning records that he had his business on Bankside in 1741. John Cator’s father Jonah is described as a glover late of Ross, Herefordshire also a Quaker. Looking at ancestry records, Ross was an epicentre of Cators, sometimes spelled Cater or Catter. Some Cators were following the established Church of England and others Quakerism, whether they were all the same extended family is a good question. Bearing in mind that the subsequent John Cator of Beckenham Place and his family, although raised as Quakers, were buried in C of E churchyards it seems that changing faith or mode of worship was not uncommon. Though early Quakers were fined for not attending Church and persecuted along with other non-conformist religions, I haven’t found any record of corporal or capital punishment unless one looks at Quakers in America, some of whom were executed by Puritans. As the officially recognized Church of England ran some of the functions now performed by Local Authorities via Parish Councils then avoiding paying money to the church via tithes was perhaps a bit like not paying your council tax and reminiscent of the poll tax demonstrations of more recent times.


Note other spelling ‘variations’ such as publickly. Also, the Quakers followed a different calendar with the year commencing on 25th of March.

Early Friends/Quakers objected to the names of the days and months in the English language because they were of a non-Christian origin. Sunday was called as such by the Saxons because it was the day they sacrificed to the sun. Monday was the day they sacrificed to the moon; Thursday was the day they sacrificed to the god Thor; and so on. Quakers thought it inconsistent for Christians to continue using the names of heathen idols. In an effort to distance themselves from these references, they created their own calendar terms using numbers, which seemed to them to be the most rational approach. Days of the week were known as “First Day” for Sunday, “Second Day” for Monday, and so forth. They used no other names but these, either in their spoken conversations or in their letters. Similarly, the months of the year were known as “First Month” for January, “Second Month” for February, and so forth. If you were a Quaker, you were expected to adopt these practices in your daily life.

Hence, the 2nd month in this record is the month of April (see text).

1728 - John Cator the younger is born in March to John Cator the elder and Mary Brough (1703 - 1764). Recorded in Quaker Meeting House registers under Southwark Births, John Cator the elder (father) identified as of the Parish of Lambeth, Surrey being a resident of Bankside? Just outside of Southwark or not yet resident at Bankside is yet to be confirmed. John the younger is often referred to as being born in Ross-on-Wye which is erroneous according to this record and perhaps a mistake as the father, John Cator the elder was from Ross but had become a timber merchant either at Bankside Southwark by this time or working for his father in law. The records show that the birth took place before the marriage and this it seems was more common than generally accepted. Indeed, the only methods for monitoring population growth were from baptisms and burials known as the Bills of Mortality. Not everyone was baptised and probably not all deaths resulted in a church burial.
The Quaker records are considered as one of the non-conformist religions. The Wikipedia entry regarding Bills of Mortality states: It must be noticed that the record is of christenings, not births; hence the figures do not include the births of Quakers, Dissenters, Jews, Roman Catholics, etc.


1728 - June; Lease and release is a property purchase method, Burrell extending his estate, some fields called Gatton's Land are traceable. The occupation of Gatton is interesting. source BHC. Lease and release of property in Beckenham, Kent, known as Holdens, Wallnut Tree Field, Colman's Croft and other land, from Richard Pearch of Keston, Kent, gentleman and Nathaniel Gatton of the Isle of Thanet, Kent, Riding Officer in His Majesty's Customs and Elizabeth, his wife to Peter Burrell of Beckenham, esquire in consideration of the sum of £532, for the lives of Nathaniel and Elizabeth Gatton.

Land identified as Gattons on the Burrell map may include these fields but Holdens and Wallnut tree fields may be duplicated names from other estates.  For example there are several Barn Fields and Pond Fields. Suffice it to say that Burrell and others are consolidating and extending  their properties.


1732 – Hugh Raymond of Saling and Stepney purchases Langley Park Estate and Simpson's Place/Farm, sold by Sir Edmund Elwill who had inherited from his brother Sir John Elwill, husband of Elizabeth Style (according to Hasted). The Styles, Elwills, Raymonds and Burrells all have memorials in St. Georges Church, Beckenham. Included in the sale of the Elwill/Styles estates is Simpsons Place which was adjacent to Bromley town. Langley straddles the Parish boundary between Beckenham and West Wickham. Elizabeth Elwill nee Style had married a Henry Bartelott after John Elwill decease. She died in 1731 which may have affected the date of the sale by Edmund. Story about family feud. Perhaps Elizabeth had intentions of carrying the estate to Bartelott? A memorial to Elizabeth is in St. George's raised by Bartelott.

1733 – John Cator’s (the Younger) brother Joseph is born. Recorded in St. Saviours Parish Southwark at the Monthly Meeting of Southwark: Union of Southwark and [St John] Horsleydown, Friends Meeting House. (from Quaker records). Joseph will be the father of John Barwell Cator who inherits Beckenham Place and its estates after 1806 and other siblings who will be trustees of the estates. Horsley Down is an area of Southwark/Bermondsey near Tower Bridge.

1734 - to be confirmed.  The bell from the clocktower of the burnt out stable block in Beckenham Place is dated 1734 which may be the date of the construction of the Clockhouse stables, or maybe even the house.  I recall seeing dated plates on the clock of its manufacture date and a repair/refurbishment date but the clock is now mostly destroyed. The bell is to be installed in the new cafe. The whole clocktower is said to have been transferred from Clockhouse to Beckenham Place, but the date is unknown. I'd like to think John Barwell Cator did it possible after the death of his father Joseph Cator who had been living at Clockhouse. Or perhaps part of general agrandisement of Beckenham Place by J.B.Cator.

1734 - 17th April Manor of Beckenham lands; Lease for 21 years at £88 per annum, of 6 closes (63 acres) in Clay Lane (occupiers, abuttals, and field names given); 7 closes (65 acres), (field names given); 3 closes called The Riddens; Riddens Wood (between Clockhouse and Penge) (20 acres); messuage and land (4 acres) occupier Mr Lethalear (Lethieullier)

Honorable John Lord Monson, Baron Burton and Honorable Richard Edgcumbem, of Mount Edgcumbe, Devon, Trustees of Honorable John St John
to Henry Batt, of Penge,Yeoman. (source; BHC 728/2/1)

Henry Batt had land at Penge and it was common for additional land to be leased from neighbouring landlords. The lease from John St. John  evidences that the St.Johns were probably not personally involved in much to do with Beckenham. John St. John 1702-1748, father of Frederick St. John (Bolingbroke), grandson of Sir Walter St. John


1735 – Another map of the Burrell estates in Beckenham and Penge reproducing detail from the 1723 map but dated 1735 drawn by John Pidduck. Recently (2019) discovered at Knepp Castle, Sussex the home of Sir Charles R. Burrell, Bt. whose branch of the Burrells descended from Peter Burrell and Amy Raymond via their younger son William who married Sophia, the daughter of Sir Charles Raymond and Sarah (nee Webster). The map is interesting as it records the arrival of Col. Hugh Raymond, spelled Raymund on the map and Penge is spelt Pench, onto the Langley estate which he bought from Sir John Elwill. The map also shows land belonging to Tolson or Toulson and Tilly. This land or much of it will come into the possession of John Cator giving rise to the interwoven patchwork of ownership which would enable later exchanges to consolidate estates. Other detail on the map shows Kelsey with a formal square lake and more detail that could only be related in a small book.











A section of the map from Knepp Castle, courtesy of Sir Charles R. Burrell, Bt. ©

1735 - Map of Langley. The original has not been found but Kent Archive has a later copy as part of 1826 title deeds when Langley was bought by the Goodhart family. Neighbouring landowners John St. John, Lethieullier and Lancelot Tolson Tilly are indicated. Hugh Raymond had bought Langley and Simpsons Farm Bromley from the Elwills in 1732. This section is only part of the park which was bought by the Goodharts.

Courtesy of Kent Archive

1735/36 - Peter Collinson (John Cator's eventual father in law) meets Carl Linnaeus (Carl von Linne) on Linnaeus’s only recorded visit to England and they become lifelong correspondents on botanical and other scientific matters. An association has been made between Cator, Collinson and Carl Linnaeus the botanist, assuming that Linnaeus contributed to the landscaping of Beckenham Place Park. We have gathered evidence regarding relevant dates of birth and death as well as age of the individuals and known movements of Linnaeus indicating this was very unlikely if not impossible. The originating reference to such an event seems to be in Robert Borrowman’s "Beckenham Past and Present" but I believe this to be a confusion arising out of the Collinson/Linnaeus connection. Linnaeus's son later visits London in 1781 in the time of John Cator and we are investigating whether they met. No evidence has emerged so far despite some material relating to Linnaeus the younger being discovered at the London Linnaean Society. Peter Collinson did communicate regularly with Linnaeus by letter. Linnaeus's only known visit to Britain was in 1735/36 when he met Collinson among many others, long before Cator then aged 7 married Collinson's daughter or created Beckenham Place. Collinson enabled Linnaeus to collect various plant specimens and collections. On Collinson's death his books and papers were passed to John Cator and thence inherited by John Barwell Cator, who then enabled them to be copied by the emergent Linnaean Society of London. One of many interesting exchanges Collinson had with Linnaeus and others was the speculation as to where swallows went in winter. It was even thought they might hibernate under water and they discussed experiments to see if this was true involving putting swallows in or near barrels of water. Collinson also discussed electricity with Franklin and the migration of people to America and its impact on the Native Americans. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society and contributed to the establishment of the Foundling Hospital. Having originated from a family home in Peckham he moved to a house inherited via his wife at Mill Hill and established his garden there. It is now the Mill Hill School; see the Mill Hill Society for further information.

       Peter Collinson (1694-1768)            Carl von Linne (1707-1778)

1736 – Elmers End Farms, Thayers Farm, The Mead, Beckenham. Wm. Brasier produces a map of the estates of Thomas Motley’s Farms at Elmers End, Thayers Farm near Clockhouse and a dwelling house in Beckenham village called The Mead on what is now known as Thornton’s corner. Neighbouring landowners are indicated. Thayers Farm is alongside the site of Clockhouse which would become the place of birth of John Barwell Cator who inherits Beckenham Place in 1806. The Clockhouse site is shown as belonging to the Lethieulliers in 1736. The Cators will later be owners or neighbours of these lands but the map answers some questions about ownership, field patterns and buildings. Other landowners shown are The Hon. John St. John (parts of Beckenham Manor), Samuel Pugh (part of the High Street where he had a mansion) and several borders with the Burrells. St.John Humphrey is also shown. The map is also a work of art in its drawing and embellishments and an example of surveyors’ and draughtsmans’ skills. (source; Kent archive). The Motleys may have been in Beckenham for some time as William Motley buried in 1727 at St. George's as an infant looks like a son of Thomas. Thomas was buried in 1758 and another Thomas who was probably a nephew according to Thomas's will was buried in 1770 at the age of 44. However, Thomas Motley d.1758 seems to have left all his property to his surviving daughter and her husband Francis Austin. Thomas had a sister Margaret who married into the Twycross family of Abingdon. I assume his brother was named William who was father to the nephews William and Thomas. Several Motleys are potential ancestors and some property in Dagenham was mentioned in the will.

Although this relates to  Elmers End much earlier, an area now inside South Norwood Country Park called The La Motes is covered by this document; https://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/sites/default/files/archcant/1976%2091%20A%20Double-Moated%20Site%20at%20Beckenham%20Thronhill.pdf

1737 - Hugh Raymond of Langley, dies and his son Jones Raymond inherits Langley Park, Simpsons Farm and other extensive properties in Essex. Hugh Raymond had purchased Langley Park in 1732 (source: Hasted, Burrell map etc.). The name Jones is derived from Hugh's wife’s maiden name. Her father Samuel Jones was also in the EIC, another ship’s captain. We recently find heritage record evidence that Hugh’s wife’s name was Dinah(Dynah) Jones and Samuel Jones was her father. Again, referring to Hasted's entry for Langley Park can explain detail but we may revisit the history of Langley in a separate account. Jones Raymond is also involved with the East India Company becoming a director. About this time, Peter Burrell was deputy governor of the South Sea Company of which Hugh Raymond was a director. Hasted’s record of the history of Langley would have us believe that Hugh’s son Jones also had a son named Jones but this is an error. I can only find record of one ‘Jones Raymond’ supported by evidence from St.George’s church memorials and birth and death records via Ancestry.co.uk. The memorials to the Raymond’s are in St. Georges Church, Beckenham, Hugh’s is pictured here. Hugh Raymond was, as well as being an EIC ships captain, ship owner and director of the South Sea Co, he became a Colonel of the Tower Hamlets' Militia for the defence of London and had a house on Tower Hill. He was also listed as being on the board of St. Thomas’s Hospital. Some of his letters regarding the day to day business of the EIC can be found in the British Library. His nephew Sir Charles Raymond is the subject of more detailed biographies. Land in Hugh Raymond’s possession on the Burrell 1735 map is annotated “Colonel Raymond” or sometimes spelt Raymund. Some time later William Burrell will marry Sophia, the daughter of Charles Raymond (Sir) and the descendant of that line Sir Charles Burrell, Baronet now occupies Knepp Castle in Sussex. William Burrell is shown as occupying premises near Kelseys on the 1769 Andrews and Drury map.



Hugh Raymond’s memorial plaque is in St. George’s Church Beckenham along with Jones Raymond’s and several members of the Burrell family.

1738 - Jones Raymond writes his will at the age of 32, following the death of his father and upon inheriting Langley and other estates in Essex, Suffolk etc. This is his final will which is acted upon after his death in 1768. Several named benefiaries will die in the interim.  see 1768/9

1739 - The Foundling Hospital: After 17 years of tireless campaigning, Thomas Coram finally received a Royal Charter from George II enabling him to establish his Foundling Hospital. Peter Collinson is one of the supporters of the Hospital established to address the problems of orphans, abandoned children, poverty and infant mortality. This was no immediate solution to problems but eventually led to improvements. As an illustration of living conditions in the 18th century, and even the 16th and 19th, it is enlightening. No direct link to the park but there was a small workhouse in Beckenham for the locally impoverished. For a long period people were associated with the Parish of their birth and if found in poverty in another parish were returned to their 'home' parish for poor relief. Some court records show rehabilitation orders for removal of people to home parishes. I recommend "London Life in the 18th Century" by M.Dorothy George if you can get a copy for a description of poverty, working conditions, housing and mortality.

1740/50 circa - A map of Langley (South part) belonging to Jones Raymond. Held in the British Library, the map is undated but Jones Raymond inherited Langley in 1737 on the death of his father, Hugh Raymond. One section of the Langley estate called Stacy's was later exchanged with John Cator. The parcel named Barnfield Wood shown on the map is annotated Lancelot Tolson Tilly who died in 1741. Other landowners shown ie John St.John The map seems to show the part of Langley in West Wickham parish, the northern part of the map is missing. Fields are annotated with an alphanumeric system and legends from L to P. Presumably the other map would show A to K. the estate is divided into leased farms with leaseholders and farm  names shown. The  Langley buildings and  avenue of trees are illustrated. Perhaps the map is dateable to Jones Raymond's inheritance.

Courtesey of the British Library (partial image) Cartographic Items Maps 188.k.3.(7.)

1741 – Lancelot Tolson Tilly (LTT) dies. He had inherited Foxgrove among the estates of his uncle Lancelot Tolson who had no other heirs. By his will of 1737, LTT dies young and in his will he leaves his estates to his parents Joseph and Mary Tilly it seems because he is not expecting a long life and in the will he states that he has not acquired estates in Banstead from his father in law Gabriel Bestman in accordance with his marriage agreement and hence does not leave estates to his wife Elizabeth Tilly nee Bestman. However Joseph and Mary Tilly also die not long after and see his mother’s will of 1743 and his wifes will of 1748 by which process the estates appear to descend to Joseph Groves, Deborah Timewell (nee Bridges) and brothers John and Edward Bridges. The relevance is that Cator acquires a lot of these estates in later purchases and exchanges which in turn he exchanges some of with the Burrells. It appears that LTT also made a will in 1726 whereby he left estates to John Simpson and John Broom (cousins). By my estimation LTT would have been only 10 years of age in 1726 and he subsequently married in 1733 at a tender age of 17 or 18. Although his later will superceded the earlier one a Chancery case was brought by the original beneficiaries.

http://aalt.law.uh.edu/AALT7/C78/C78no1883/IMG_0084.htm

1742 – Henry St. John, 1st Viscount St. John dies, the Manor of Beckenham is thought to be inherited by his eldest son by his first marriage, Henry, 2nd Viscount St. John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke (ennobled with that title in 1712). But maybe Beckenham Manor was granted to his son by a second marriage, The Honourable John St. John (1702-1748). See Wikipedia and History of Parliament online for more information on the St. Johns/Bolingbrokes. The family seat was in Wiltshire. Their estates were also in Battersea where there was a residence. There is no evidence of them occupying Beckenham Manor as a home and maybe they were absentee landlords although their land in Penge was in the Parish of Battersea. Some St. Johns are buried in St Mary’s Church, Battersea indicating that the residence was some distance from Beckenham Manor. Some question remains about which St.John held Beckenham Manor as "The Honourable John St. John" is annotated on maps around 1735. Perhaps this Henry divided his estates prior to his death as the only real estate mentioned in his will is a remainder left to his daughter Henrietta. Only the effects and chattels of Lydiard Tregoze and Battersea are mentioned. Henry is described in History of Parliament as being a Restoration Rake and was once convicted of murder though a pardon was purchased from the Crown.


Henry 2nd Viscount St. John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke

1743 – This passage explains how Foxgrove Manor becomes divided some land became part of Beckenham Place or was part of exchanges to extend the park:
27 Aug: Mary Tilly nee Tolson dies, sister (niece?) of John Tolson 1670-1713 Gent of Staples Inn London though from Bekesbourne Kent (and Lancelot Tolson his brother of Plaistow, Bromley), widow of Joseph Tilly and in her will Foxgrove land in Bromley, Beckenham and Lewisham that was held in the Tolson family since 1712/16 become divided as she leaves Stone Farm and Plaistow to her widowed daughter in law Elizabeth Tilly. She leaves Foxgrove Farm and woodlands in Bromley, Beckenham and Lewisham to Deborah Timewell a kinswoman married to Edward Timewell of Chigwell, Essex, but the conditions of the Will state that if Deborah dies without issue (which she did in 1752) then the property goes to her brothers John and Edward Bridges, other kinsmen. The link to the Bridges family is via Sir John Roberts of Bekesbourne, Kent who had four or five daughters one of whom married into the Bridges and another into the Tolsons. Another bequest of a farm at Wadhurst goes to Nathaniel Tilly of Shepton Mallet, Somerset. As the Bridges brothers inherit Deborah did not have surviving children. The brothers later sell their parts of Foxgrove to Jones Raymond.

Also, in this year 27/7/1743 presumably before her death Mary Tilly grants the following lease: Originally part of Foxgrove: 14 yr lease from Michaelmas 1743 Mary Tilly to St John Humphrey woodlands named Lewisham Land Wood, Barnfield Wood, Clayhill Wood, Cold Shaws Wood, Bushey Picketts, Bushey Acres, Crooch Oat Shaws, Southerlands Woods, Tootswood, Kingswood, Bromley Wood, The Willows, two pieces Morris Wood – 200a late occ Lancelot Tolson Tilly. (Bromley ref 728/1/3)

St.John Humphrey is shown as a landowner on the various maps, possibly related to the St.Johns by some previous marriage.

The two Morris Wood and Lewisham Lands are on the Foxgrove maps and shown as Morrisswood East and West and Lewisham Lands which is now Summerhouse Wood. Rocque calls the whole area Langstead Wood on his map but I now question his source of information as Langstead Lane on his map is shown as Lagg Street Lane on the Foxgrove map of 1766.

The three pieces of land along with the rest mentioned in the lease come into the possession of John Cator. Barnfield Wood, Bushey Picketts, Bushey Ten Acres are in his exchange with Jones Raymond and Peter Burrell in 1759/60.

When the lease expires in 1757 it matches a time when Cator is acquiring land in Beckenham.

1744 - 22nd May; Release of property and lands called Holdens, Ashenfield, New Wheatfield, Walnut Tree Field and Colman's Croft in Beckenham, Kent, between Nathaniel Gatton of Beckenham, yeoman, son of Nathaniel Gatton, deceased; Francis Dipper of Beckenham, yeoman and Mary, his wife and Elizabeth Gatton, spinster (1st part); Charles Peyton of Clements Inn, Middlesex, gentleman (2nd part) and Peter Burrell of Beckenham, esquire (3rd part). In consideration of the sum of £800 to be laid out be laid out by Burrell in the purchase of South Sea annuities, the first parties bargain and sell the property to Peyton as a perfect tenant in order that a recovery shall be suffered against him to sell the property to Burrell.

Land identified as 'Mr Gattons' on the 1735 Burrell map probably accounts for this property which is very close to Burrells Kelsey estate. see 1728



1745 - Rocque's Map is published showing about 10 miles around London including the park area. Note the houses or farms on Stoms Hill which would predate the Mansion. Some buildings on Stumps or Stoms Hill make us curious about any pre-existing buildings. Certainly there was a house or farm near the Mansion which is illustrated on the Road Diversion plan, of which more later. The detail in Rocque's Map and some of the names are perhaps questionable. Rocque has Stoms instead of Stumps Hill and Langstead Wood is called Morrisswood or Lewisham Lands on estate plans. Rocque’s use of the name Stoms Hill reminds me of the Stomeshulle name in the 1334 taxation list? Also the road should run more north/south than it does east west on his map which might be regarded as schematic rather than accurate? As he was mapping all of London and its surroundings some short cuts and errors are likely. See the comparison with the Andrews and Drury map of 1769 later on which shows Cator’s house on the site of the buildings indicated in this Rocque map. The will of Izarde Curtys of 1590 refers to his property at Stumpeshill so occupation and buildings predating the current mansion is most likely. If we take Rocque’s map and the Drury map as reasonably accurate then perhaps earlier building remains are under the mansion forecourt and on the opposite side of the drive through the park.




I’m sticking my neck out a bit here but the buildings between Stoms and Hill are the site of the Mansion, supported by the evidence of the Andrews, Drury and Herbert map later on in 1769. The small building just to the right of “Stoms Hill” could be the Home Farm. The buildings just above and left of Fox could be the Farm shown on the 1785 road diversion plan. Southend Road and Beckenham Hill do not exist at this time, the road shown is now the drive through the park.

John Cator’s brother Samuel is born, he will perhaps be the least fortunate of the Cator brothers.

1746-51 - (Elmers End etc) Thomas Motley's daughter Anne marries Francis Austin and Thomas purchases some estates on behalf of Francis. There are marriage settlement documents etc in Kent Archive. Subsequently Anne Motley, now Austin seems to die in childbirth of Francis Motley Austin in 1747. A purchase sum of £3,800 is recorded and there is more to discover about these transactions but I believe the property is in other parts of Kent or maybe Lewisham. More research required.

1748 – Foxgrove: Elizabeth Tilly nee Bestman dies, she had inherited part of Foxgrove Manor from her mother in law Mary Tilly. Her uncle Joseph Groves inherits Stone Farm and land at Plaistow from her. Elizabeth was Lancelot Tolson Tilly’s widow. Foxgrove Farm or Manor was left to John and Edward Bridges by Lancelot Tolson Tilly’s mother Mary Tilly nee Tolson. See earlier entries for the procession of land ownership from Leigh to Tolson to Tolson Tilly and to Groves. All the result of no direct heirs to leave property to either through no issue or early death hence the property of Foxgrove Manor becomes divided between more distant kin. Groves already owned substantial other property as do the other beneficiaries of the Foxgrove bequests.

1748 - Southwark: The Cator timber business recorded as John Cator and Son at Mouldstrand Wharf, Bankside, Southwark. (source: Pat Manning). It may be of some interest to know what became of the timber business of the father in law, John Brough of Westminster. Did both businesses continue or did Brough’s become John’s via any means. I find a John Brough occupation Sawyer married at Ratcliffe Stepney, and residing in Lambeth, dying in 1732. There may be a son who died young in 1721 and another daughter Sarah dying in 1722 and this might make the daugher Mary married to John Cator the elder the only heir.

1748 - Death of The Honourable John St.John who's name appears on maps of Beckenham estates. His son Frederick will inherit the Manor of Beckenham along with St. John estates in Battersea. This link includes good background information about the St.John family https://www.friendsoflydiardpark.org.uk/doc/report33.pdf   but only one reference to Beckenham in John St.John's will " I give and bequeath unto the Reverend Mr Thomas Clarke Rector of Beckenham in the County of Kent the Sum of Fifty pounds of lawfull Mony of Great Britain as a small remembrance for his kind Services" which might recollect some unrecorded visit to Beckenham. Lydiard Tregoze was the family seat in Wiltshire.

1749 - Peter Collinson moves from his house in Peckham to Ridgeway House, Mill Hill. Though seemingly a long way from Cator's home at Southwark it must be remembered that Collinson had a business in Gracechurch Street, London and both families probably met at Quaker gatherings. The Meeting House in Long Lane, Southwark is a likely venue although Devonshire House in Bishopsgate is another possibility as it was the venue for John Cator and Mary Collinson’s wedding. Whether any association had formed by this time is unknown. The subsequent marriage of Collinson’s daughter to Cator identifies Collinson as of Gracechurch Street so it seems he resides at both Mill Hill and Gracechurch Street much in the same way as Cator comes to reside at Beckenham and Southwark and later the Adelphi on the Strand. Collinson’s gardens at both Peckham and Mill Hill gain a reputation much respected in horticultural and botanical circles. He supplies plants to several high ranking people and is associated with Joseph Banks and  Solander who accompany Captain Cook on his round the world voyage.

1749 (or 1751?) - Frederick, 3rd Viscount St. John, inherits the Manor of Beckenham and and the title Viscount St. John from his father John St. John. The title Viscount Bolingbroke is inherited from his uncle Henry in 1751 with estates in Battersea. There is perhaps some confusion to be clarified here as Hasted’s account is meandering and earlier maps of 1736 show John St. John as landlord of at least parts of Beckenham Manor. Many aristocrats had more than one title and sometimes changed names when intermarrying or inheriting estates. This can add some confusion to tracing events. Although it seems Bolingbroke did not own much land which is now in the park apart from a couple of plots, his sale of the extensive Beckenham Manor lands to Cator did allow Cator to become 'Lord of the Manor' after 1773, but without any title other than Esquire.



Frederick 3rd Viscount St.John, 2nd Viscount Bolingbroke

1749 - Village Place

1 December 1749
DescriptionDeed of exchange between Peter Burrell of Beckenham, Kent, esquire and Gent Unwin of Beckenham in relation to lands in Beckenham.
Capital messuage and property in Beckenham
Date1685- c.1834
DescriptionCapital messuage in the town of Beckenham, with land called the Ridge lying behind it, three houses in the High Street and other lands and gardens in Beckenham and a seat or gallery in Beckenham parish church annexed to the capital messuage.
Administrative HistoryThe mansion was built between 1718 and 1720 by William Davies, surgeon. After 1834 it was variously called 'Village Place' and 'The Cedars'.

Another account by Rob Copeland describes the Cedars as being opposite Village Place.

source Bromley Collections


1751 - Death of Henry St. John, 2nd Viscount St. John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke. He died in 1751, in the seventyninth year of his age, having been twice married; first to Frances, daughter and coheir of Sir Francis Windebank, bart. of Berkshire; and secondly to Mary Clara des Champs de Maresilly, marchioness de Vilette, relict of the marquis Vilette, and niece to the celebrated madam de Maintenon, wife to Louis XIV. but having no issue by either, his titles and estates descended to his nephew, Frederick, the third lord viscount St. John, viz. son of John, second and only surviving son of Henry, viscount St. John, by his second wife Angelica, before mentioned. John viscount St. John, married in 1729, Anne, one of the three daughters and coheirs of Sir Robert Furnese, bart, of Waldershare, in this county, and had by her Frederick before mentioned, and Henry, a lieutenant-general in the army, and two daughters.

Some mystery surrounds what property was belonging to Henry St. John and his half brother John St. John. The only property mentioned in their father's will of 1708 is either money, chattels, or a remainder of property left to their sister Henrietta. Whether prior to 1708 some division and distribution of property took place is a possibility as prior to John St. John's death

An account of Henry St. John is on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_St_John,_1st_Viscount_Bolingbroke

1753 - John Cator the younger of Southwark marries Mary Collinson, daughter of Peter Collinson FRS, merchant and botanist on the 30th August. The ceremony takes place at The Quaker Meeting House, Devonshire House, Bishopsgate, London, it is recorded in Quaker marriage records. The guests and family members are listed on the document which is viewable in Ancestry.co.uk. The marriage settlement document is in Surrey Archive whose catalogue states that no property is mentioned in the settlement. There is more about John and Mary in the ‘Additional Information’ separate publication/file although apart from some passing remarks not much is said or known about Mary. Hester Thrale later records ‘Mr Cator, his wife and a niece, Miss Collison (sic)’ visiting her at Streatham. Collison is a variation of the spelling of Collinson and this would be Mary’s brother’s daughter. Although Hester Thrale and others record some conversations with John Cator nothing is recorded by way of conversation with Mary Cator. Whether this indicates a shy or quiet disposition or maybe snobbery on the part of Hester Thrale and others is to be pondered upon.

1753 – John Cator’s youngest brother William is born. “This is to certify the birth of William Cator son of John Cator (the Elder) was registered in the books of Horsley Down Meeting, London, the 18th day of the first month called January 1753” and is dated October 26th 1770.” There is reference to a William Cator as Cornet ensign 2nd Lt August 2 1769, who resigned April 3 1772, Madras in the book of Officers in the Indian Army by Dodwell and Miles. (source: Pat Manning). William will later make some fortune with the East India Company, become an owner or partner in a brewery business but , try to return to India with the East India Company when his brewery business fails but he is killed by French privateers near Calcutta. (some source material in Westminster archive and a Will with Canterbury Prerogative Court).

1756 - Peter Burrell I of Langley (1692-1756) dies and properties are inherited by his widow Mrs. Amy Burrell. This may include some of the parts of Foxgrove Manor which are now in the park but they seem to come to her later via her brother Jones Raymond. Also his son Peter Burrell II of Langley Park inherits other properties, this needs clarification as estate plans show properties in the names of both Peter Burrell (II) and his mother Mrs Amy Burrell. Peter Burrell I had been Sheriff, Kent 1732-3; director, South Sea Co. 1724-33, sub-governor 1736- d.; director R. Exchange Ass. 1726-38. His position with the South Sea Company was after the Bubble affair and after his marriage to Amy Raymond which may have enabled his entry into the company through Hugh Raymond.
Peter
Burrell’s Will mentions his properties at Beckenham and a house at Covent Garden.

1756 - Is also the year in which Amy Burrell's sister Dinah dies. This will have some implications on the inheritance of the Raymond Langley estates later in 1768/9
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=lSM31F4_EQEC&dq=%22john%20west%22%20%22black%20silk%20dyer%22&pg=PA267#v=onepage&q=dinah&f=false

1757 - John Cator buys lands at Southend (source P.Manning from records at Kent Archive).
"The property of Francis Valentine whose ownership was demonstrated by the inclusion of a family tree. John Cator paid £1000 on 25th November 1757 for a messuage, outbuildings, yard, garden and several pieces of land at Southend, Lewisham."

Subsequent research into the Valentine family tree, wills and property reveals that Francis Valentine the elder d.1736 had extensive properties including The Bell in Bromley, The Kings Arms at Farnborough and a Red Lion at Southend. (The Red Lion disappeared or got renamed) One of his grandchildren inherited the Green Man at Southend and whether the Red Lion changed name is an interesting question. Cator exchanges the Green Man with the Forsters of Southend later in 1794 but this purchase from Francis Valentine the younger could be any of the land around Southend Green as it was then called, which was left to the sons and daughters of Francis Valentine the elder.

It now seems unlikely that this is the Stumps Hill land on which the house is built but it is the earliest record of John Cator and Southend. Moving records onto databases might not have the same detail as old card indexes and we cannot find the record at |Kent Archive online. It might be part of ‘Manorial deeds’ records at Kent Archive. However £1000 at that time seems a lot of money unless it was for a substantial amount of land i.e. “several pieces”. Certain areas not covered by the Foxgrove or Beckenham Manor plans might have been part of this purchase. As Cator was acquiring land in several divers places and many landlords had widespread disconnected plots under their ownership several scenarios are possible.

What we do find later in 1794/95 is that John Cator seems to be the landlord (owner not publican) of the Green Man at Southend and a bakers and some cottages. See 1794/95 for more detail. He exchanges these with John Forster for a Mill and other property. Cator estate maps of 1833 and 1869 show land at Southend as part of the estate but not necessarily ‘emparked’. The term ‘emparked’ indicates added to parkland and probably fenced off from general access.

1757 - Frederick Viscount Bolingbroke marries Lady Diana Spencer, daughter of the Duke of Marlborough. The marriage is accompanied by a complex marriage agreement assigning trustees to Bolingbroke’s estates and guaranteeing Diana an income from the estates. From my cursory delving into the reports of subsequent court cases it would take a law professional to come up with an understandable summary of the subsequent events. See 1773 Cator’s purchase of the Manor of Beckenham. And the dissolution of Bolingbroke’s marriage to Diana Spencer

Lady Diana Spencer, later Diana Beauclerk
when remarried after her divorce from Bolingbroke in 1768.

Also in 1757 - Viscount Bolingbroke exchanges the Beckenham 'Old' Manor House and grounds opposite St. George's Church for Woolsey’s Farm at Clay Hill with Peter Burrell II of Langley, the son of Peter (I of Langley) and Amy Burrell. As Peter Burrell I had died the previous year perhaps Woolsey’s Farm was a legacy and the manor house was seen as an attractive exchange? I haven’t found any record of any Bolingbroke’s residing in Beckenham, being more of an absentee landlord, and the house may have been becoming a liability for maintenance or not fetching any income whereas a farm would bring rents? The Burrell’s did spend at least some time in Beckenham with various  members occupying Kelsey, Langley, Houses in the village and were buried in the Church or churchyard.
Bromley Historic Collections archive has this record:

1/2 August 1757 Lease and release and exchange of property between Right Honourable Frederick Lord Viscount Bolingbroke, Baron of Lydiard Cregote (should read Tregose?), Wiltshire and Viscount St John Baron Battersea of Surrey (1st part) and Peter Burrell of Beckenham, Kent, esquire.

The first parties (one person with several titles) assign the mansion house known as the Manor House at Beckenham, Kent with 8 acres of land to Burrell, in exchange for a messuage called Woolsey's Farm and lands and woodland in Beckenham. (Bromley Historic Collections). Roughly 65.5 acres. Burrell got Mansion 8acres, Great & Little Downs 17a abutting to the north Beckenham to Bromley Road, to the south Peter Burrells Garden, west a meadow called Court Mead and east Stone Field occ Peter Burrell. Also Court Mead